Man pointed gun at milk driver near school, deputies say

Cumberland County Sheriff's Office said Imes approached a milk delivery driver, pointed a gun at him and said, "Who are you?"

  • Liberty University students choose sides after fallout from coronavirus reporting
    Yahoo News

    Liberty University students choose sides after fallout from coronavirus reporting

    The New York Times reported this week that almost a dozen Liberty University students have come down with COVID-19 symptoms since the school reopened last week, according to a bombshell article published Sunday that cites a local physician in Lynchburg, Va., where the evangelical university is situated. “We've lost the ability to corral this thing,” Dr. Thomas W. Eppes Jr. said he told Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr., according to the article. The Times identified Eppes as the head of the school's student health service, but he does not appear on the Liberty University website and a school spokesman told Yahoo News he has no official connection to the university.

  • A right-wing network beloved by Trump has been banned from White House briefings for violating social-distancing restrictions
    Business Insider

    A right-wing network beloved by Trump has been banned from White House briefings for violating social-distancing restrictions

    MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images The White House Correspondents Association (WHCA) has been limiting the number of people who can attend President Donald Trump's daily coronavirus press briefings to ensure social distancing rules. It has been operating a rotating attendance list, with reporters going at different times but not all at once. But Chanel Rion, a reporter for the right-wing One America News Network (OANN), attended White House briefings twice despite not being on the attendance list.

  • Masquerade or needed aid? Virus help from China proves contentious
    AFP

    Masquerade or needed aid? Virus help from China proves contentious

    As European and American healthcare systems creak under the strain, China has offered millions of face masks and teams of medical experts. As well as seeking to deflect criticism over initial Chinese missteps in handling the epidemic, analysts say, the campaign is a public relations opportunity in China's great power rivalry with the West and especially the United States. COVID-19 first emerged in a wild animal market last year in the Chinese city of Wuhan, but Beijing says the situation in China is now under control with domestic cases dwindling to zero.

  • PA Man ‘Upset Over Coronavirus’ Shoots Girlfriend Before Turning Gun on Himself: Cops
    The Daily Beast

    PA Man ‘Upset Over Coronavirus’ Shoots Girlfriend Before Turning Gun on Himself: Cops

    A Pennsylvania man “extremely upset” about losing his job amidst the coronavirus pandemic allegedly shot his girlfriend, before turning the gun on himself in an attempted murder-suicide, authorities said Wednesday. The Wilson Borough Police Department said in a statement to The Daily Beast that Roderick Bliss IV, 38, attempted to fatally shoot his girlfriend with a semi-automatic pistol on Monday afternoon, before dying by suicide, after he “had become increasingly upset over the COVID-19 pandemic. The 43-year-old girlfriend, who was shot once in the back, survived the attack and is in St. Luke's hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

  • Differing death tolls in California and Louisiana hint at the urgency to 'flatten the curve'
    NBC News

    Differing death tolls in California and Louisiana hint at the urgency to 'flatten the curve'

    The two states have instituted increasingly restrictive measures and are among the 23 states with stay-at-home orders. Both states are led by Democratic governors who have earned praise from President Donald Trump for their response to the crisis. The disease is still spreading in both states, and the number of new cases and deaths reported each day is still climbing.

  • Defense lawyer in death of 7 motorcyclists: Biker at fault
    Associated Press

    Defense lawyer in death of 7 motorcyclists: Biker at fault

    One of the motorcyclists in a crash that killed him and six fellow bikers on a north woods highway was drunk and actually was the one who hit a pickup and caused the accident, the lawyer for the truck driver charged with homicide said in a document made public Tuesday. A New Hampshire State Police account of the June 21 crash in the community of Randolph “was deeply flawed," the lawyer for truck driver Volodymyr Zhukovskyy, 24, of West Springfield, Massachusetts, said in a motion filed Friday that seeks a hearing to set him free on bail. State police initially determined that the flatbed trailer he was hauling was 1 1/2 feet over the center line at the time of impact, the motion said.

  • Americans purchasing record-breaking numbers of guns amid coronavirus
    The Guardian

    Americans purchasing record-breaking numbers of guns amid coronavirus

    Americans have responded to the coronavirus epidemic with a record-breaking number of gun purchases, according to new government data on the number of background checks conducted in March. More than 3.7m total firearm background checks were conducted through the FBI's background check system in March, the highest number on record in more than 20 years. An estimated 2.4m of those background checks were conducted for gun sales, according to adjusted statistics from a leading firearms industry trade group.

  • Great Recession showed countries can’t fight the coronavirus economic crisis alone
    USA TODAY Opinion

    Great Recession showed countries can’t fight the coronavirus economic crisis alone

    As the world economy enters an unprecedented crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and policymakers in Washington and other global capitals prepare record fiscal stimulus plans, stakeholders should heed an important lesson from the last financial downturn in 2008: Recovery is only possible through coordinated global action. A little more than 10 years ago, as the world was entering the Great Recession, stakeholders had to look far back in the rearview mirror to the Great Depression for policy guidance. While the actions of the 1930s did offer important lessons for 2008 — most notably the need to expand the money supply — the economy of the 1930s was fundamentally different than the global economy of the early part of this century.

  • Shenzhen becomes first Chinese city to ban eating cats and dogs
    BBC

    Shenzhen becomes first Chinese city to ban eating cats and dogs

    Shenzhen has become the first Chinese city to ban the sale and consumption of dog and cat meat. It comes after the coronavirus outbreak was linked to wildlife meat, prompting Chinese authorities to ban the trade and consumption of wild animals. Shenzhen went a step further, extending the ban to dogs and cats.

  • Reuters

    'It's just impossible': tracing contacts takes backseat as virus spreads

    Faced with more than 70 cases of the novel coronavirus and a deadly outbreak in an assisted living community in his town, Ed Briggs is overwhelmed. The health director for Ridgefield, Connecticut, says there is no way that he and his staff of two can identify and isolate all the people who have interacted with an infected patient, not at the rate cases are multiplying across the town. Known as contact tracing, this vital but labor-intensive process is becoming increasingly difficult for stretched health departments in towns and cities across the United States, which has more than 160,000 cases, more than any country in the world.

  • Trump Threatens ‘Heavy Price’ If Iran Attacks U.S. Troops
    Bloomberg

    Trump Threatens ‘Heavy Price’ If Iran Attacks U.S. Troops

    President Donald Trump warned Iran against what he said was a possible “sneak attack” the Islamic Republic was planning against U.S. troops in Iraq. Trump indicated in a tweet that the U.S. had “information” about a possible attack but didn't elaborate. He said Iran would pay a “very heavy price” if there's an attack.

  • Russian plane makes its way to U.S. with coronavirus medical equipment
    Yahoo News Video

    Russian plane makes its way to U.S. with coronavirus medical equipment

    A Russian military transport plane was headed to the United States on Wednesday carrying tons of medical equipment and masks to help Washington fight the coronavirus outbreak, Russian state TV reported and a U.S. official said.

  • 12 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed Architecture
    Architectural Digest

    12 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed Architecture

    From Zaha Hadid's majestic MAXII in Italy to the stunning beauty of Frank Gehry's Vitra Design Museum, these structures elevate the environment they were built in Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Army attack helicopters teamed up with Navy ships to practice holding enemies 'at high risk' in the Middle East
    Business Insider

    Army attack helicopters teamed up with Navy ships to practice holding enemies 'at high risk' in the Middle East

    US Navy/MCS 3rd Class Matthew F. Jackson In March, US Navy surface ships, including a destroyer, worked with Army Apache helicopters to practice responding to threats at sea. The addition of Army aircraft expands the Navy's ability to do reconnaissance and to hold threats at bay, a Navy officer said. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

  • North Korea insists it is free of coronavirus
    AFP

    North Korea insists it is free of coronavirus

    North Korea remains totally free of the coronavirus, a senior health official in Pyongyang has insisted, despite mounting scepticism overseas as confirmed global infections near one million. The already isolated, nuclear-armed North quickly shut down its borders after the virus was first detected in neighbouring China in January, and imposed strict containment measures. Pak Myong Su, director of the anti-epidemic department of the North's Central Emergency Anti-epidemic Headquarters, insisted that the efforts had been completely successful.

  • Navy says it can't empty Roosevelt amid coronavirus because of its weapons, nuclear reactor
    USA TODAY

    Navy says it can't empty Roosevelt amid coronavirus because of its weapons, nuclear reactor

    WASHINGTON – The coronavirus outbreak aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt escalated Wednesday as more sailors tested positive for the virus and U.S. Navy officials scrambled to respond to the desperate evacuation plea from the aircraft carrier's captain. As of midday Wednesday, 93 crew members had tested positive for the virus, and 593 tested negative, Thomas Modly, acting Secretary of the Navy, told reporters during a briefing Wednesday. There are approximately 5,000 crew members on board.

  • U.S. is swiftly deporting migrant children at the border
    CBS News

    U.S. is swiftly deporting migrant children at the border

    Citing a public health order to curb the coronavirus pandemic, the Trump administration is swiftly deporting unaccompanied migrant minors apprehended near the U.S.-Mexico border, upending a long-standing practice required under a federal law designed to protect children from violence and exploitation. Despite initially maintaining that the new measures would not apply to unaccompanied minors, Customs and Border Protection on Monday said its officials could deny entry to children who cross the southern border alone under an order by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC. The agency said some minors could be excluded from the CDC directive if a border official "suspects trafficking or sees signs of illness."

  • Tablighi Jamaat: The group blamed for new Covid-19 outbreak in India
    BBC

    Tablighi Jamaat: The group blamed for new Covid-19 outbreak in India

    The Tablighi Jamaat have come into the spotlight after an event they held in the Indian capital Delhi has spawned a number of Covid-19 clusters across the country. Who are the Tablighi Jamaat? The organisation was founded in 1926 in the northern Indian region of Mewat by prominent Islamic scholar Maulana Mohammed Ilyas Kandhlawi.

  • One nursing home offers grim advice: Take your loved ones home
    NBC News

    One nursing home offers grim advice: Take your loved ones home

    With the coronavirus now spreading through the nursing home, Pam Loshak fears for her ailing father — and for the staff members at the Mary Manning Walsh Home, who don't have enough personal protective equipment to slow transmission of the disease, despite their hands-on care for those most vulnerable to the virus. ArchCare, which runs the facility and four other nursing homes in the New York area, has been forced to outfit staff members in rain ponchos and beautician gowns to stretch their dwindling supply of protective gear, according to Scott LaRue, president and CEO of the company, which is affiliated with the Archdiocese of New York.

  • CNN’s Jim Acosta: ‘This Was a Different Trump’ at Coronavirus Briefing
    The Daily Beast

    CNN’s Jim Acosta: ‘This Was a Different Trump’ at Coronavirus Briefing

    CNN chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta, known for his rough-and-tumble verbal battles with President Donald Trump, likely raised eyebrows among CNN viewers on Tuesday night when he praised the president's new tone at the latest White House press briefing, claiming “this was a different Trump.” During the briefing, Acosta asked whether projections of up to 200,000 deaths would be lower if Trump had acted sooner, prompting the president to insist that he did act early. Appearing on CNN later in the evening, Acosta told anchor Anderson Cooper that the president and the rest of the White House coronavirus task force delivered a sober message to the public that they'll need to be prepared for a heavy death toll.

  • Pausing the World to Fight Coronavirus Has Carbon Emissions Down—But True Climate Success Looks Like More Action, Not Less
    Time

    Pausing the World to Fight Coronavirus Has Carbon Emissions Down—But True Climate Success Looks Like More Action, Not Less

    I care about climate change because I care about people, and people are dying right now. Thankfully, true climate success isn't anything like today's situation—even if emissions are down. Successfully mitigating emissions implies the rapid deployment of new, clean technologies, not a collapse of the global supply chain.

  • Turkey Widens Virus Response With Central Bank’s Bond Buying
    Bloomberg

    Turkey Widens Virus Response With Central Bank’s Bond Buying

    Turkey's central bank on Tuesday added to its emergency program to help contain the economic fallout from the coronavirus outbreak, as the country's number of confirmed cases surged 25% and the death toll climbed to 214. The bank introduced new measures to ease lenders' access to credit and support liquidity in the government bond market, before the latest data showed Turkey's caseload of Covid-19 rose to 13,531 from 10,827 from a day ago. The latest step, unveiled two weeks after the central bank's first round of emergency measures, amount to “Turkish QE,” or quantitative easing, said Timothy Ash, a strategist at Bluebay Asset Management in London.

  • A gallon of gas for 95 cents? It's here — and it will soon be even cheaper.
    Business Insider

    A gallon of gas for 95 cents? It's here — and it will soon be even cheaper.

    The national average is below $2 a gallon, and dozens of stations are selling gas for 99 cents or less. One station in Wisconsin said it was selling gasoline for 87 cents a gallon. The website GasBuddy says the average could fall to $1.49 a gallon by mid-April, and gas prices will likely remain cheap through the summer.

  • Six-week-old newborn dies of coronavirus in US: state governor
    AFP

    Six-week-old newborn dies of coronavirus in US: state governor

    A six-week-old infant has died of complications relating to COVID-19, the governor of the US state of Connecticut said Wednesday, in one of the youngest recorded deaths from the virus. Governor Ned Lamont tweeted that the newborn was "brought unresponsive to a hospital late last week and could not be revived." "Testing confirmed last night that the newborn was COVID-19 positive," Lamont said.

  • Reuters

    Top EU court says eastern states broke law by refusing to host refugees

    The European Union's top court ruled on Thursday that Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic had broken the law by refusing to host refugees to help ease the burden on southern states such as Greece and Italy after a surge in migrant arrivals from 2015. The ruling underscores Europe's bitter divisions over migration, though the three ex-communist nations face no immediate penalty as the relocation of tens of thousands of people agreed by the EU was only envisaged until 2017. "By refusing to comply with the temporary mechanism for the relocation of applicants for international protection, Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic have failed to fulfil their obligations under European Union law," the Luxembourg-based Court of Justice of the European Union said in its ruling.