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Margaret Brennan On Violence At Capitol, Biden's Infrastructure Plan

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Face The Nation host Margaret Brennan discusses President Biden's infrastructure plan and the death of another Capitol Police officer.

Video Transcript

- Breaking news out of Washington, DC, a US Capitol Police officer killed. Investigators say a man drove right into two officers at a barricade. One officer died at the hospital. The other was seriously hurt. The suspect is dead as well. Police say they shot him after he lunged at officers with a knife.

"Face the Nation" host Margaret Brennan joins us now live from Washington tonight. Margaret, great to see you. This is the first incident at the Capitol since the January 6 riots.

MARGARET BRENNAN: It is the first violent incident at the Capitol since January 6, but this is the fourth officer to have lost his life since that time. Remember, there was the officer killed that day when the Capitol was seized by those thousands of pro-Trump supporters. Then you had two suicides in the wake of that from officers. Many would say that was directly linked to their experiences. And then you had this today.

We will have more on the evening news tonight in regard to the motivations or suspected motivations of the attacker. But also, on Sunday, we'll continue to update you on how lawmakers are reacting. Congressman Ritchie Torres of the Bronx will be one of my guests on Sunday. We want to talk to him about inequity in his district, which is one of the poorest in the country. But we will also talk to him about the state of Homeland Security in our nation's capital.

- Margaret, when President Biden announced his $2 trillion infrastructure plan earlier in the week, he said at the time that he hoped to get bipartisan support. Now, the Senate Minority Leader, Mitch McConnell, says the legislation won't receive a single Republican vote. So what happens here? Do the Democrats try to negotiate? What happens?

MARGARET BRENNAN: Well, the president also has to get some Democrats on board, because there are a number, particularly in the Northeast, from the New York delegation, who are objecting to the fact that this so-called salt provision-- the state and local tax deduction cap that the Trump administration had put in there-- wasn't pulled back. This is also something Speaker Pelosi said for her constituents out in San Francisco who are financially hurt by that, that they would like that revision.

So there's some work to do for the White House to get all Democrats on board, and ultimately, to try to get any kind of bipartisan support-- Republicans in the Senate, as you mentioned, objecting to a number of provisions-- the size of this and how it's paid for-- in fact, the hike in the corporate tax rate, one of the big sticking points. But we want to, on Sunday, David, dig into what's inside this plan. It's labeled infrastructure, but there is a lot more built into this spending program.

Given the job growth we saw today, what is the White House justification? Where's the weakness they see? And how does this solve that problem? We'll talk about that with Cecilia Rouse, the president's top economic advisor.

- And spending $2 trillion. Margaret Brennan, we always appreciate your insight here on our Friday afternoon. We hope you have a great weekend. And you can watch Margaret on "Face the Nation" Sunday morning at 10:30, right here on Channel four. [? Paula? ?]