Marina Abramovic and Jeff Koons appear in new Marcel Duchamp documentary

Performance artist Marina Abramovic at the Museum of Modern Art in Belgrade on September 21, 2019
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"Marcel Duchamp: The Art of the Possible," now available online at Amazon and iTunes, explores the philosophy and legacy of one of the most influential modernists of the 20th century.

The documentary, directed by American filmmaker and sculptor Matthew Taylor, examines how Duchamp's work shaped our understanding of aesthetics, art, and culture.

"I have forced myself to contradict myself in order to avoid conforming to my own taste," reads a quote from the French-born artist at the beginning of the film.

"Marcel Duchamp: The Art of the Possible" features appearances from scholars, museum curators and artists who discuss how Duchamp's ideas have influenced the 21st century and modern day.

Among them are Jeff Koons, Joseph Kosuth, Dove Bradshaw, Alison Knowles, Ed Ruscha, Carolee Schneemann and Hiroshi Sugimoto, among others.

Marina Abramović also makes an appearance in the full-length survey to share how Duchamp influenced her own practice.

"There is something he said that I always repeat when I talk about my own work. When you make a work of art, you always have to create space in this work, so that the public can finish it," the Serbian-American performance artist says in a clip from the documentary.

Elsewhere in the film, Jeff Koons points out that his work "is building on" Duchamp's artistic concept of "readymades," whereby an ordinary object is redefined by the artist as a work of art.

This provocative idea rose to prominence in April 1917, when the American Society of Independent Artists rejected Duchamp's submission to their open exhibition. The artwork in question was a men's upturned urinal signed and dated with the appellation "R. Mutt, 1917," and titled "Fountain."

"When I'm working with an object or a readymade, I don't care about that object. That object is a metaphor to communicate to the viewer that they are perfect. There is no judgement, no hierarchy, no segregation against them. They are what is important. It's never about the object. The object is always a metaphor for the acceptance of others," the American artist and sculptor further explains.