Marny Xiong, St. Paul School Board Chair, Dies Of COVID-19

Scott Anderson

ST. PAUL, MN — Saint Paul School Board Chair Marny Xiong has died from COVID-19 early Sunday, her family says.

According to information posted on her Go Fund Me memorial campaign page, family that Marny was still in critical condition on June 1, noting that it was day 28 of her struggle with the virus and subsequent infection. She lost her life Sunday after a month in critical condition at a local hospital.

Family says Marny, 31, "will be remembered as an inspiring community organizer, a courageous leader and fierce champion for education, gender equity, and racial justice. She was a selfless public servant who made the community’s problems her duty to solve."

How To Help

Support for Marny Xiong: Medical and Funeral

She grew up on the east side of St. Paul and attended St. Paul Public Schools. She attended Longfellow Elementary, Washington Middle School, and Arlington High School, graduating with class of 2007.

She graduated from the University of Minnesota Duluth with a BA in Political Science and a minor in African and African American Studies in 2012.

Marny was a School Administrative Manager at Hmong International Academy in the Minneapolis Public Schools District. In 2017, Marny was elected to the St. Paul School Board. She was elected Chair of the Board in 2020.

This article originally appeared on the Saint Paul Patch

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