Mars Wrigley's is expanding, and these new candy bars will now be Topeka-made products

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Mars Wrigley will invest $175 million in Topeka to add Milky Way and 3 Musketeers production lines, the company announced Tuesday.
Mars Wrigley will invest $175 million in Topeka to add Milky Way and 3 Musketeers production lines, the company announced Tuesday.

Hope you've grown into your sweet teeth, Topeka, because some new candy bars are coming to town.

Mars Wrigley will begin producing Milky Way and 3 Musketeers chocolate candy bars at its Topeka plant, as well as expand production of its existing Snickers line, the company announced Tuesday.

More than 100 new jobs are expected from the $175 million investment, which will also help increase efficiency in other aspects of the company's candy production.

"We thank the city of Topeka, Shawnee County, and the state of Kansas for their continued partnership and support,” said Brian Pardo, site director of the Topeka plant, in a release. “We’re proud to bring better moments to the Topeka community, and along with our investment, will continue our work with local organizations including Junior Achievement, the Topeka Zoo and Washburn Tech."

Milky Way, oldest Mars candy, is 99

In expanding its candy bar production, Mars Wrigley will invest $175 million in Topeka and add 100 jobs, the company announced Tuesday.
In expanding its candy bar production, Mars Wrigley will invest $175 million in Topeka and add 100 jobs, the company announced Tuesday.

The Milky Way bars, known as Mars bars elsewhere in the world, turn 100 in 2023 and are Mars Wrigley's oldest chocolate bar brand. They were originally named after a popular milkshake the candy's inventor, Franks Mars, had tried to replicate.

The 3 Musketeers bars, on the other hand, are only known by that name in the U.S. and Canada. Elsewhere, the fluffy, chocolate-covered nougat treats are known as Milky Way bars, confusingly enough. The U.S. and Canada name is because the candy originally came in packages of three bars when they were first created in 1932.

Other candies made in Topeka are M&Ms Peanut and Twix.

Mars Wrigley has invested over $750 million since it came to Topeka in 2014

Local leaders lauded the company's investment in the community, calling the company a great partner since it opened its south Topeka facility in 2014.

Mars Wrigley in the early stages of the pandemic had donated more than 18 pallets of candy to essential workers in Topeka, trying to sweeten what had been a stressful situation.

The company has previously used $66,000 in community cash incentives to expand its Topeka plant, with the company claiming to have created about 500 jobs through $750 million in facility investments.

More: Sweet gesture — Mars donates candy to city’s essential workers

"It is exciting to see the expansion of the Mars Wrigley factory here in Topeka," Mayor Mike Padilla said in the company's release. "This expansion means more jobs in our community. I join others by celebrating this economic development achievement, and I look forward to seeing the new expansion come to life."

Expansion work has already started and should be completed by 2023, the company said in its release. Jobs will be posted on the company's career page as they become available.

Rafael Garcia is an education reporter for the Topeka Capital-Journal. He can be reached at rgarcia@cjonline.com. Follow him on Twitter at @byRafaelGarcia.

This article originally appeared on Topeka Capital-Journal: Mars Wrigley to produce Milky Way, 3 Musketeers in Topeka