Martina Navratilova: John McEnroe Made Far More For Wimbledon Commentary

Tennis great Martina Navratilova said her salary for Wimbledon commentary was no match for John McEnroe’s ― and she’s slamming the BBC for the disparity.

Navratilova said in a BBC Panorama documentary to air Monday that McEnroe earned at least 10 times more than she did for BBC coverage of the Grand Slam tournament.

“It’s hard to really compare exactly because some people work a little longer days, maybe a few more programs or whatever,” Navratilova said in a preview clip of “Britain’s Equal Pay Scandal,” posted by BBC Panorama (watch above). “But overall, it was a shock because John McEnroe makes at least 150,000 pounds. I get about 15,000 pounds for Wimbledon. And unless John McEnroe’s doing a whole bunch of stuff outside of Wimbledon, he’s getting at least 10 times as much money than I am for very comparable work.”

Martina Navratilova, pictured left with Chris Evert and John McEnroe in 2012, said she was told by the BBC that her pay was comparable to McEnroe's.  (Photo: Mary Chastain / Reuters)

Navratilova made about 10 appearances compared with 30 for McEnroe during Wimbledon, BBC Panorama estimated, per the Telegraph.

BBC Sport told the Guardian that McEnroe’s participation was of “a different scale, scope and time commitment.”

“Along with Sue Barker, John is regarded as the face of our Wimbledon coverage,” a spokeswoman said. “He is a defining voice within the BBC’s coverage. He is widely considered to be the best expert/commentator in the sport, highly valued by our audiences and his contract means he cannot work for another UK broadcaster without our permission. His pay reflects all of this – gender isn’t a factor.”

McEnroe’s earnings came to light last year when the BBC published a list of its highest-paid personalities, putting his pay between £150,000 and £199,999 ($210,560 to $280,740), HuffPost UK reported. The tennis championships last about two weeks.

When told that the BBC may use McEnroe’s greater hours as a defense, Navratilova said the disparity still didn’t add up. She said she was told that she and McEnroe were making a comparable wage.

“It makes me angry for the other women that I think go through this,” she said.

Reps for McEnroe didn’t immediately respond to a HuffPost request for comment.

Also on HuffPost

"Rad American Women A-Z"

The title sums this book up. Following the alphabet, kids can learn about the many women, including Billie Jean King and Angela Davis, who made great contributions to American history. (By Kate Schatz, illustrated by Miriam Klein Stahl)

"Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors?"

Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors? tells the story of Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman to receive a medical degree in the U.S. Author Tanya Lee Stone is also the mind behind Who Says Women Can't Be Computer Programmers? (Illustrated by Marjorie Priceman)

"Are You An Echo?"

Are You An Echo? weaves the work of Japanese poet Misuzu Kaneko with her life story in a bilingual book. (Illustrated by Toshikado Hajiri, text and translation by David Jacobson, Sally Ito, and Michiko Tsuboi) 

"Women In Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed The World"

Kids interested in STEM (and even those who aren't) will love reading about the many women, including primatologist Jane Goodall and mathematician Katherine Johnson, who made their mark on several different scientific fields. (Written and illustrated by Rachel Ignotofsky)

"Buffalo Bird Girl: A Hidatsa Story"

In this picture book, author and illustrator S.D. Nelson, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in the Dakotas, shares with kids the story of Buffalo Bird Girl, a Hidatsa Indian who lived during the 1800s.

"Here Come the Girl Scouts!"

Shana Corey shares the history of the Girl Scouts and the organization's founder, Juliette Gordon Low. (Illustrated by Hadley Hooper)

"Shaking Things Up: 14 Young Women Who Changed The World"

This book includes the stories of women who made their mark on the world early on. It features Ruby Bridges, the inspiring 6-year-old who helped desegregate an all-white school in the South, and Mae Jemison, the first African-American woman in space. The book, as noted on the cover, is "illustrated by 13 extraordinary women." (By Susan Hood)

"Dolores Huerta: A Hero To Migrant Workers"

In this book by Sarah Warren, labor activist and civil rights icon Dolores Huerta takes the center stage. (Illustrated by Robert Casilla)

"The Youngest Marcher"

In The Youngest Marcher, kids will meet Audrey Faye Hendricks, a Civil Rights activist who taught the world you're never too young to make a difference. (By Cynthia Levinson, illustrated by Vanessa Brantley Newton)

"Frida Kahlo"

This book teaches kids about the life of artist Frida Kahlo, and is part of the "Little People, Big Dreams" series, which highlights extraordinary women. (By Maria Isabel Sánchez Vegara, illustrated by Gee Fan Eng)

"Shark Lady"

Shark Lady includes a title many kids will love as well as the story of Eugenie Clark, a famous marine biologist who adored sharks and their fellow friends under the sea. The title comes from the nickname Clark earned for her work. (By Jess Keating, illustrated by Marta Álvarez Miguéns)

"Good Night Stories For Rebel Girls"

Good Night Stories For Rebel Girls is a wildly popular book that started as a Kickstarter project and is filled with stories of trailblazing women paired with illustrations from women artists. Timbuktu Labs released the second volume last year.

"Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker"

Kids can learn about Josephine Baker, an African-American singer, dancer, and Civil Rights activist, in this picture book written by Patricia Hruby Powell and illustrated by Christian Robinson.

"Malala's Magic Pencil"

Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani activist for girls education and recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, tells her own story in Malala's Magic Pencil. (Illustrated by Kerascoët, a joint pen name for Sébastien Cosset and Marie Pommepuy)

"Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History"

Little Leaders informs kids about black history and the women who made it, including abolitionist Sojourner Truth and poet Maya Angelou. (Written and illustrated by Vashti Harrison)

"Brave Girl: Clara and the Shirtwaist Makers' Strike of 1909"

Brave Girl tells the story of Clara Lemlich, a leader of the women's labor movement who helped guide the Uprising of the 20,000 shirtwaist workers strike that began in 1909. (By Michelle Markel, illustrated by Melissa Sweet)

"Sonia Sotomayor: A Judge Grows In The Bronx/La Juez Que Creció En El Bronx"

This bilingual book shows kids how Sonia Sotomayor persevered to become the first Hispanic U.S. Supreme Court justice. (By Jonah Winter, illustrated by Edel Rodriguez)

Love HuffPost? Become a founding member of HuffPost Plus today.

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.