Massachusetts woman arrested for allegedly calling in hoax bomb threat to Boston Children’s Hospital

·2 min read

A 37-year-old Massachusetts woman was arrested on Thursday for allegedly making a hoax bomb threat to Boston Children’s Hospital on Aug. 30.

Catherine Levy was taken into custody at her home in Westfield, about 70 miles west of the hospital, and charged with one count of making a false telephonic bomb threat.

The phone that she allegedly used to make the bomb threat was also recovered, Massachusetts U.S. Attorney Racheal Rollins said at a press conference.

Boston, MA - February 26: A pedestrian passes the Longwood Avenue exterior of the Boston Children's Hospital on February 26, 2020. (Photo by Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images) <span class="copyright">Photo by Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images</span>
Boston, MA - February 26: A pedestrian passes the Longwood Avenue exterior of the Boston Children's Hospital on February 26, 2020. (Photo by Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images) Photo by Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

It's one of several threats that have been levied in recent weeks against Boston Children's Hospital, which has the first pediatric and adolescent transgender health program in America.

"The caller said, in part, ‘There is a bomb on the way to the hospital. You better evacuate everybody you sickos,’" Rollins said.

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Last month, Libs of TikTok highlighted videos on the hospital's YouTube channel about "gender-affirming" hysterectomies.

The hospital recently updated its website to read, "To qualify for gender affirmation at Boston Children's Hospital, you must be at least 18 years old for phalloplasty or metoidioplasty and for vaginoplasty." The website previously read that a patient must be "at least 17 years old for vaginoplasty."

Boston Children's Hospital in Boston on Feb. 26, 2020. <span class="copyright">Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images</span>
Boston Children's Hospital in Boston on Feb. 26, 2020. Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Rollins declined to comment on the motive in Leavy's case on Thursday.

"While I cannot comment further on the alleged motive of this case, I want to say generally that health care providers who support and offer care to gender-diverse and transgender individuals and their families deserve to do so without fear," Rollins said Thursday.