Matt Buckler: Channels 3, 61 on top of water story

·3 min read

Oct. 14—It's something many of us take for granted — good tasting water.

In three local towns, however, the water hasn't tasted and smelled the way it usually does and WFSB-TV3 and WTIC-TV61 provided the best coverage of why it was happening.

Reporters Gabby Molina of Channel 61 and Sharon Johnson of Channel 3 reported because of an abundance of rain this year, more algae was created in the reservoir that serves Ellington, South Windsor, and Vernon.

A spokesman for Connecticut Water Co., however, said the water is safe to drink.

Molina poured a glass of water from a faucet, and the water looked clear. But she didn't drink any of it. After all, it might take a while for people in South Windsor, Vernon, and Ellington to trust their water again.

Channel 3 also had the best coverage of a major story Wednesday involving Plainfield eighth-grade teacher and basketball coach Craig McCue, who was suspended after being accused of inappropriate relationships and risk of injury to a minor.

Because parents trust teachers with their children, it's always a big story when someone breaks that trust.

Channel 3 was the only station that presented video of a parent speaking out at a Plainfield school board meeting held Wednesday.

Because local TV cameras weren't allowed at the meeting, it had to use video of a live stream. The station and reporter, Erin Edwards, still got the point across. The meeting wasn't packed with angry parents, but those who were there weren't happy.

This story created a lot of attention and no one provided more details than Channel 3.

Fascinating Feldman

When you look at the ratings for Tuesday's Chapter 6 of FX's "Impeachment: American Crime Story," there isn't much to look at.

The show was ranked 29th in the cable ratings with an audience of 554,000. That is not very good, not even for a cable show.

Those 554,000, however, were able to watch an Emmy-caliber performance of Beanie Feldman, who plays Monica Lewinsky in this series that follows the Lewinsky-President Bill Clinton affair and all the controversy that followed, resulting in Clinton's impeachment.

Tuesday's episode focused on Lewinsky and how she was detained in a Washington D.C. hotel room for almost 12 hours as the FBI tried to get her to help them take down Clinton.

Feldman showed a huge range of emotions during the episode — she was scared, frightened, and intimidated — and charming at times — but she didn't give the FBI what it wanted and eventually walked out of the room. It showed that tax dollars were wasted, even in 1998.

After that episode, it would be difficult for Feldman not to win an Emmy — it was an amazing performance.

The Emmy nominations don't come out until August, but it's doubtful we'll see a better effort than the one Feldman presented Tuesday.

Lewinsky came out looking good in the episode. The FBI, however, came out liking like a bunch of bullies, treating Lewinsky with no respect at all.

Sometimes the facts are rearranged in these TV presentations to squeeze out more drama.

According to fact-checkers who watched the episode, the events of "Impeachment" are very accurate. Most of what we saw Tuesday actually happened.

The script was mind-boggling, but Feldman was the real star of the show. As a result, the Emmy race for best dramatic actress in a limited series is over — and the season hasn't really started yet. Only 554,000 saw it — but we can all appreciate it.

Follow Matt Buckler for more television, radio, and sports coverage on the JI's Twitter @journalinquirer, and see his articles on the Journal Inquirer Facebook page.

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