Meghan awarded $630,000 after privacy win

After the win in her privacy case against the Mail on Sunday, Meghan, Britain's Duchess of Sussex wants the paper to pick up her legal costs.

The Duchess was awarded 450,000 pounds as a provisional payment.

She is seeking 1.5 million pounds in legal fees, that's about 2.1 million dollars, with half the amount to be paid within 14 days. The paper has described the sum as "disproportionate."

Last month, a judge at London's High Court ruled the tabloid had breached her privacy and infringed her copyright by publishing parts of the five-page letter she wrote to her father Thomas Markle.

She had fallen out with him on the eve of her wedding to Prince Harry.

Judge Mark Warby ruled in her favor without holding a trial, saying the articles were a clear breach of privacy.

The paper argued the duchess had intended the letter’s contents to become public and that it formed part of her media strategy.

At a hearing on Tuesday, Warby refused the paper permission to appeal that decision. Warby also agreed to make an interim costs order saying the final sum "may well be considerably more than that".

Her legal team has also demanded the paper hands over any copies it has of the letter.

And has called for the judge to order the paper to publish a statement on its front page stating she had won her case.

With a notice also placed on the MailOnline's home page for "not less than 6 months."

Video Transcript

- After the win in her privacy case against "The Mail" on Sunday, Meghan, Britain's Duchess of Sussex, wants the paper to pick up her legal costs. The Duchess was awarded 450,000 pounds as a provisional payment. She is seeking 1.5 million pounds in legal fees. That's about $2.1 million, with half the amount to be paid within 14 days. The paper has described the sum as disproportionate.

Last month, a judge at London's High Court ruled the tabloid had breached her privacy and infringed her copyright by publishing parts of the five-page letter she wrote to her father, Thomas Markle. She had fallen out with him on the eve of her wedding to Prince Harry. Judge Mark Warby ruled in her favor without holding a trial, saying the articles were a breach of privacy. The paper argued the Duchess had intended the letters' contents to become public, and that it formed part of her media strategy.

At a hearing on Tuesday, Warby refused the paper permission to appeal the decision. Warby also agreed to make an interim costs order, saying the final sum may well be considerably more than that. Her legal team has also demanded the paper hands over any copies it has of the letter, and has called the judge to order the paper to publish a statement on its front page stating she had won her case, with a notice also placed on "The MailOnline's" home page for not less than six months.