Michigan At Risk For 'Imminent' Coronavirus Outbreak, Group Says

Joey Oliver
·2 min read

MICHIGAN — Michigan is at risk for an imminent outbreak of the coronavirus, according to the national nonprofit COVID Act Now.

The website, which updated its status for Michigan Friday, reported that Michigan is either actively experiencing an outbreak or is at extreme risk. The site reports that coronavirus cases are growing in Michigan and its preparedness is significantly below international standards.

According to COVID Act Now, Michigan is averaging a 25.7 new cases per 100K people, which is calls a "dangerous" number.

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The infection rate in Michigan is 1.23 as active cases increase rapidly, according to the site.

Michigan has an adequate testing amount, according to COVID Act Now, with a 6.4 percent positive test rate.

The state can likely handle a new wave of COVID-19 cases, according to the nonprofit, with 24 percent of ICU headroom used.

Michigan has seen an alarming trend recently, with the number of new cases growing and COVID-19 deaths increasing as well, according to state health officials.

On Thursday, the state reported its highest single-day increase in new COVID-19 cases, adding more than 3,600 cases. That came less than a week removed from its previous highest influx of new cases, and just a day after reporting its second-highest single-day increase.

State health officials on Thursday tightened restrictions on indoor gatherings and shifted the Traverse City region backward in the state's reopening plan, saying that coronavirus hospitalizations have doubled in the last three weeks and the statewide death rate has risen for five straight weeks.

"The only way to beat COVID is to act on what we've learned since March," MDHHS Director Robert Gordon said. "Wear masks. Keep six feet of distance. Wash hands. And avoid the indoor get-togethers where we have seen COVID explode."

This article originally appeared on the Detroit Patch