Mike Huckabee Endorses Rep. Doug Collins as Intra-Republican Battle for Georgia Senate Seat Heats Up

Zachary Evans

Former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee on Wednesday endorsed Representative Doug Collins (R., Ga.) against incumbent Senate-appointee Kelly Loeffler in the special election for Loeffler’s seat.

“I’ve watched Doug Collins fight against all odds in a vicious Pelosi-led and Adam Schiff/Jerry Nadler fueled House of Representatives,” Huckabee said in a statement. “He unflinchingly has stood up to the Trump-hating Democrats in the House and the Trump-hating media.” Collins was a staunch ally of President Trump during the House impeachment inquiry.

“Governor Huckabee is a leader who has never wavered from the conservative cause and I couldn’t be more proud and excited to have his support,” Collins said in response to Huckabee’s endorsement.

Collins decided to run for the Senate seat, vacated by Johnny Isakson due to health issues, after Georgia Governor Brian Kemp appointed Loeffler to the seat. President Trump and allies had wanted Kemp to appoint Collins, citing the representative’s record of support for the president. Conservatives have also criticized Loeffler’s record on abortion.

However, since Collins decided to enter the race for Loeffler’s seat, the National Republican Senate Committee has harshly criticized the representative for a move they believe will jeopardize the Republican Senate seat.

Collins “is a swamp creature that claims to be conservative,” NRSC executive director Kevin McLaughlin told CNN on Wednesday. “Now, having made an emotional, ill-informed and selfish decision, he finds himself at a crossroads. Republicans who are working to reelect President Trump and retain the Senate majority hope he has a moment of clarity, does the right thing and walks away from this poor decision.”

The NRSC has also warned vendors and consultants not to work with Collins or risk losing all NRSC business, causing at least three vendors to abandon Collins just days after joining the campaign, according to the Wall Street Journal.

More from National Review