• Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Miki Gorman Breaks Records & Barriers In The World Of Running

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

As we celebrate Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, CBS2's Cindy Hsu shares the story of a champion marathon runner who broke records and barriers.

Video Transcript

MAURICE DUBOIS: As we celebrate Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, we share the story of a champion marathon runner who broke records and barriers.

KRISTINE JOHNSON: CBS 2's to Cindy Hsu has her story.

CINDY HSU: Running one marathon is hard enough, but imagine winning two New York City Marathons and two Boston Marathons. Miki Gorman is the only woman who has achieved that.

- Miki, how do you feel? That seems to be the question of the day.

MIKI GORMAN: I feel good, super.

- And how does it feel being in New York City and winning again for the second year?

MIKI GORMAN: Oh, I'm just so happy-- no words, I'm just happy.

CINDY HSU: Miki grew up in Japan until coming to the US in 1964. She didn't start running until her 30s, when her husband encouraged her to work out. Miki's daughter, Danielle.

- My dad wanted her to get into the gym, get a little bit more active.

CINDY HSU: In 1976, at 41 years old, Miki won the New York City Marathon, then came out on top again the next year.

- Miki, your stature-- you're about 5'1". I'd say maybe you're 90 pounds. Physically, how do you endure this?

MIKI GORMAN: Well, many people ask me how I can learn because I'm so small and look fragile. But for long distances, you don't have to have the big body.

CINDY HSU: I talked with George Hirsch, chairman of the board of New York Road Runners, who ran with Miki.

GEORGE HIRSCH: Just a dominant force in running, though-- I mean, the best in the world.

CINDY HSU: George last saw her in 2012, when she was inducted into the New York Road Runners Hall of Fame. As an Asian-American woman in a sport that was overwhelmingly white and male, she broke down barriers in so many ways.

- I'm sure she was faced with a lot of discrimination.

She wouldn't hold on to that. I think she'd use that as more drive and motivation to succeed.

CINDY HSU: And her success inspired so many. Her childhood village in Japan started the Gorman Cup 10K in her honor. She has her own children's book and even a trading card. She passed away in 2015 at 80 years old.

- I wish my mom was alive right now to experience this movement and the conversation that's being elevated.

CINDY HSU: One that focuses on equality and lifting everyone up. Cindy Hsu, CBS 2 News.

MAURICE DUBOIS: Wow, what a great attitude.

KRISTINE JOHNSON: Love that profile.

MAURICE DUBOIS: Incredible, right?

KRISTINE JOHNSON: Such small stature, but huge spirit, huge heart.

MAURICE DUBOIS: Unstoppable.

KRISTINE JOHNSON: And talk about endurance, right?

MAURICE DUBOIS: Right.