Mitt Romney wants some of the damage at the US Capitol left as a reminder of the attack

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Graig Graziosi
·3 min read
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Senator Mitt Romney has been the only GOP senator willing to openly criticise Donald Trump. (Getty Images)
Senator Mitt Romney has been the only GOP senator willing to openly criticise Donald Trump. (Getty Images)

Republican Sen. Mitt Romney reportedly wants to keep some of the damage done during the US Capitol insurrection on 6 January.

An aide to Mr Romney told NBC News correspondent Leigh Ann Caldwell that the senator thought it would be wise to maintain some of the damage done to the US Capitol on the day of the attack to keep the incident fresh in the lawmakers' minds.

While many Republican lawmakers spoke out against the violence at the Capitol, Mr Romney was one of the few who directly blamed Donald Trump for inciting the attack.

"We gather today due to a selfish man’s injured pride and the outrage of his supporters whom he has deliberately misinformed for the past two months and stirred to action this very morning. What happened here today was an insurrection, incited by the President of the United States," Mr Romney said in a statement.

He said the rioters' should be remembered for trying to overturn a legitimate election.

"Those who choose to continue to support his dangerous gambit by objecting to the results of a legitimate, democratic election will forever be seen as being complicit in an unprecedented attack against our democracy. They will be remembered for their role in this shameful episode in American history. That will be their legacy," he said.

The attack on the Capitol prompted the House to impeach Mr Trump for a historic second time. The president's second impeachment trial is set to begin on 8 February.

Some Republicans, like Sen. Tom Cotton, have called the second impeachment unconstitutional, arguing that Mr Trump is no longer in office and thus should not be eligible for impeachment.

Constitutional scholars have largely disagreed with that argument, and Mr Romney added his voice to those who said impeaching Mr Trump for a second time is well within the bounds of the Constitution.

Mr Romney told Fox News that the second impeachment was warranted and acceptable under the Constitution, calling it an “attack on the very foundation of our democracy. It’s something that has to be considered and resolved.”

The likelihood of Mr Trump receiving a conviction at his second impeachment trial is extremely slim. Democrats would need to convince 17 Republicans to vote to convict Mr Trump. Any Republican that votes to convict Mr Trump would be handing potential primary challengers potent ammunition with which to attack them.

Mr Romney is the only Republican Senator who voted to convict Mr Trump during his first impeachment trial. Thus far, the senator has not indicated which way he will vote in Mr Trump's second trial.

However, Mr Romney was one of only three Republican senators to sit in the chamber as Democrat impeachment managers delivered the articles of impeachment to the Senate. Sens Mitch McConnell and Roger Marshall were also in the chamber.

Numerous Republican lawmakers have complained that the impeachment would further divide the country and have insisted that if Democrats want "unity" - as Joe Biden urged during his inaugural address - they should drop the impeachment trial.

Mr Romney disagreed, arguing instead that unity would only be possible through justice.

“If we’re going to have unity in our country, it’s important to recognize the need for accountability, for truth and justice,” he said.

Read More

Mitt Romney hounded by Trump supporters on plane to DC

Mitt Romney laments ‘loopy and nutty’ end to Trump presidency

Trump’s Covid response has been ‘great human tragedy,’ says Romney

Senate sworn in as Trump impeachment jury as dozens remain undecided

Biden: Trump’s second impeachment ‘has to happen’ despite divisiveness

Trump impeachment goes to Senate, testing his sway over GOP