More than 2 dozen California students were left behind in Afghanistan following the final US flight out of the country

·2 min read
Taliban take control of Hamid Karzai International Airport after the completion of the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, in Kabul, Afghanistan on August 31, 2021.
The Taliban took control of Hamid Karzai International Airport after the completion of the US withdrawal from Afghanistan on August 31. Wali Sabawoon/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
  • At least 24 students from California are in Afghanistan after the last US flight out of the country.

  • The students are from San Diego and Sacramento, local news outlets reported.

  • Officials from both California school districts said efforts were underway to get the students out.

  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

More than two dozen students from two school districts in California are stuck in Afghanistan following the final US flight out of the country earlier this week.

Officials from the Sacramento-area San Juan Unified School District told the Sacramento Bee on Tuesday that at least 24 students were stranded in Afghanistan. Meanwhile, officials from the San Diego-area Cajon Valley Union School District told KGTV that three students from one family were left behind in the country amid the Taliban takeover.

The Sacramento Bee reported that the San Juan school district was working with US Rep. Ami Bera to evacuate its remaining students from Afghanistan. A representative for Bera told the newspaper in a statement that the students' information had been sent to the State Department and Department of Defense, but that they'd received no update from either department.

The Cajon Valley school district has been working with US Rep. Darrell Issa to get the children from its district out of Afghanistan, Fox5 reported.

Issa and Bera did not immediately return Insider's requests for comment.

Cajon Valley Superintendent David Miyashiro told the news outlet that he was hopeful that the one Cajon family left in the country would be evacuated, because they knew where the family was and still had the means to get to them. It was "just much more complicated now."

"One of our eighth graders, he said it was chaos," Miyashiro told Fox5 of one of the students still in Afghanistan. "You could see it in his eyes, anxiety and fear."

Miyashiro told Fox5 that it's a "conservative estimate" to say that over 1,000 children that are US citizens or children of Special Immigrant Visa holders are stranded in Afghanistan. Miyashiro speculated that over 20,000 US citizens and SIV holders were still in the country.

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