More than 260 Black-owned businesses in and around L.A.

Liz Polk, from left, Jerry Lorenzo, Keya Nkonoki and Logan Williams.

Liz Polk, left, Jerry Lorenzo, Keya Nkonoki and Logan Williams are owners in fitness, fashion, yoga and nursery businesses. (Los Angeles Times illustration)



"What can I do to help, right now?" It's a question many have asked after the death of George Floyd focused the nation's attention on police killings, entrenched racism and discrimination.One answer? Support Black-owned businesses. "Part of what helps is when you genuinely value Black people for who they are and what they do," Logan Williams told us. "Spend a couple bucks at Black businesses and tell your friends about them." (He and his father, Jimmy Williams, run Logan's Gardens, and are believed to be the only Black-owned nursery business in Southern California.) Readers have asked us for assistance to do just that, so we are compiling a resource guide to assist those who want to support the Los Angeles area's many Black-owned brands and businesses. So far, our evolving list includes 260 restaurants, fashion- and design-related businesses, fitness studios and coffee shops. If you know of a business that should be on this list, email us at Image@latimes.com. Some of the businesses listed in the stories below have kept their bricks-and-mortar doors open, others have temporarily shuttered their locations because of the coronavirus pandemic's restrictions and are relying on online sales. All have three things in common: They're Black-owned, based in the Greater Los Angeles area and open for business.

  • Trump news - US president struggles with series of words during Mount Rushmore speech as Pence calls him 'my father' in campaign ad
    The Independent

    Trump news - US president struggles with series of words during Mount Rushmore speech as Pence calls him 'my father' in campaign ad

    Donald Trump accused "angry mobs" of trying to erase US history by removing statues in a dark and divisive Independence Day speech on Friday evening from Mount Rushmore. Painting himself as a bulwark against left-wing extremism, the US president barely mentioned the coronavirus pandemic, despite the country that setting a new record for confirmed new cases, as he struggled to correctly pronounce a series of words. One of those new Covid-19 cases included Donald Trump Jr's girlfriend, Kimberly Guilfoyle, who tested positive just a week after attending a party in which guests were reportedly not wearing masks.

  • Biden evokes MLK and George Floyd in Fourth of July message
    CBS News

    Biden evokes MLK and George Floyd in Fourth of July message

    Evoking the names of Martin Luther King and George Floyd, Joe Biden said Saturday that the U.S. "never lived up" to its founding principle that "all men are created equal." In the Fourth of July video message, Biden said that even though America had fallen short of equality, the effort to live up to the nation's founding ideals continues. It survived the ravages of the Civil War, the dogs of Bull Connor, the assassination of Martin Luther King, and more than 200 years of systemic racism.

  • Michael Cohen may have violated the terms of his prison release by eating out at a restaurant in Manhattan
    Business Insider

    Michael Cohen may have violated the terms of his prison release by eating out at a restaurant in Manhattan

    The New York Post obtained photos showing Michael Cohen eating out at a Manhattan restaurant Thursday night. Cohen is currently serving a three-year sentence under home confinement, and eating out appears to be a violation of the conditions of his release from a federal prison camp. Business Insider reached out to the Bureau of Prisons for comment but did not immediately receive a response Saturday morning.

  • USCIS has had to slow down during the pandemic. Some immigrants will benefit from this
    Miami Herald

    USCIS has had to slow down during the pandemic. Some immigrants will benefit from this

    The coronavirus crisis and the budget shortfall the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is facing, somehow have turned in favor of immigrants with open processes, who must support their visa, green card and citizenship applications with more evidence or documents. As the pandemic has slowed the agency's work pace since it normalized operations on June 4, immigration authorities again extended this week more flexibility in the delivery deadlines to assist immigrants and foreigners responding to agency requests. The U.S. government's initiative seeks to “to minimize the immigration consequences for those seeking immigration benefits during this time,” said the agency, which could furlough nearly three-quarters of its workforce, cutting back administrative operations as tens of thousands of foreign nationals eagerly await their ceremonies to become a U.S citizen through naturalization.

  • Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a War
    The National Interest

    Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a War

    Fighter jets, stealth bombers, attack drones and air-traveling missiles all need to “operate at speed” in a fast-changing great power conflict era. When faced with fast, multi-frequency, long-range precision fire from enemy air defenses, air attackers simply must “operate at speed,” according to U.S. Air Forces, Europe Commander General Jeffrey Harrigian, who used the phrase in a discussion with The Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies. Harrigian, who is also now the Commander of U.S. Air Forces Africa, ran much of the air campaign during Operation Inherent Resolve against ISIS; he offered a first-hand war perspective in a conversation with retired Lieutenant General David Deptula, Dean of the Mitchell Institute.

  • Hydroxychloroquine lowers COVID-19 death rate, Henry Ford Health study finds
    FOX News Videos

    Hydroxychloroquine lowers COVID-19 death rate, Henry Ford Health study finds

    Researchers analyzed the health outcomes of 2,451 patents over a six month period; analysis from cardiologist Dr. Ramin Oskoui, CEO of Foxhall Cardiology.

  • Copenhagen's Little Mermaid labelled 'racist fish'
    Reuters

    Copenhagen's Little Mermaid labelled 'racist fish'

    Denmark woke up on Friday to the words "racist fish" scrawled across the base of the "Little Mermaid", the bronze statue honouring Hans Christian Andersen's famous fairy tale that perches on a rock in the sea off a pier in Copenhagen. "We consider it vandalism and have started an investigation," a spokesman for the Copenhagen police said. Protesters of the Black Lives Matter movement around the world have in recent months rallied against statues of historical figures who played a role in racist oppression, such as slave traders and colonialists.

  • 'How the hell are we going to do this?' The panic over reopening schools
    Politico

    'How the hell are we going to do this?' The panic over reopening schools

    Yet the beginning of the school year is nearing and worried parents are wondering if they will be able to count on in-person classes resuming by the time they must return to work, inextricably tying school reopenings to the revival of the economy. In Virginia, Fairfax County's teachers unions say teachers aren't comfortable returning to schools and are encouraging members to state their preference for online learning until more information about face-to-face instruction is available. In Texas, the governor is now requiring face masks in public spaces in counties with 20 or more Covid-19 cases — but his order didn't mention schools.

  • US, China left out as England slashes quarantine list
    AFP Relax News

    US, China left out as England slashes quarantine list

    Travellers from more than 70 "low-risk" countries and territories will no longer have to self-isolate when arriving in England, the UK government said Friday in a major easing of its coronavirus quarantine scheme. The list of exemptions mostly covers Europe -- but not Portugal -- and the Caribbean, Australia and New Zealand, although the United States and mainland China are notably omitted. The changes, which come into effect on July 10, represent a significant lifting of the mandatory 14-day self-quarantine imposed one month ago to stop new infections from abroad.

  • Judge blocks Portland police from using physical force against journalists
    The Independent

    Judge blocks Portland police from using physical force against journalists

    The order comes after the police arrested journalists who were covering a protest on Tuesday. One of them, Lesley McLam, was taken into custody. The restraining order declares that the police “are enjoined from arresting, threatening to arrest, or using physical force directed against any person whom they know or reasonably should know is a journalist or legal observer … unless the police have probable cause to believe that such individual has committed a crime”.

  • Locals remain anxious amid India-China border stand-off
    BBC

    Locals remain anxious amid India-China border stand-off

    In the weeks leading up to the clash, there were reports of scuffles between the two militaries over the Line of Actual Control (LAC), the poorly demarcated border between the two nuclear-armed powers. Deadly brawl Reports from May said that the Chinese forces put up tents, dug trenches and moved heavy equipment several kilometres inside what had been regarded by India as its territory. The move came after India built a road several hundred kilometres long connecting to a high-altitude forward air base which it reactivated in 2008.

  • Why Is the Public Corruption Unit Prosecuting Ghislaine Maxwell?
    The Daily Beast

    Why Is the Public Corruption Unit Prosecuting Ghislaine Maxwell?

    A curious detail appears in the press release announcing the arrest of Ghislaine Maxwell on charges of conspiring with Jeffrey Epstein to sexually abuse minors. On Thursday, Audrey Strauss, the newly appointed acting U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, announced that Maxwell had been charged in a six-count indictment accusing her of enticing and transporting a minor to travel to engage in criminal sexual activity, conspiracy to commit those offenses and perjury in connection with a sworn deposition. The charges were not a surprise in light of by Strauss's predecessor, Geoffrey S. Berman, last year after Epstein died of an apparent suicide in jail.

  • Kimberly Guilfoyle, Trump campaign official and girlfriend of president's son, tests positive for coronavirus
    NBC News

    Kimberly Guilfoyle, Trump campaign official and girlfriend of president's son, tests positive for coronavirus

    Kimberly Guilfoyle, a senior Trump campaign official and Donald Trump Jr.'s girlfriend, tested positive for coronavirus while in South Dakota on Friday, the chief of staff for the Trump Victory Finance Committee confirmed Friday. Trump Jr., the eldest son of President Donald Trump, tested negative, Sergio Gor said. Neither Trump Jr. nor Guilfoyle traveled with the president on Air Force One as the president went to Mount Rushmore for a July 4th weekend celebration that was held Friday, Gor said.

  • It Would Cost Trillions: The Day North Korea Collapses
    The National Interest

    It Would Cost Trillions: The Day North Korea Collapses

    The prospect of a peaceful Korean Unification, however remote it seems, would be a historical event worth planning for. Hoping for the best means there is a scenario where North Korea's collapse and regime change occur miraculously, opening doors to South Korea and the West to take over North Korea in what one hopes would be a peaceful absorption. In November 1989, West and East Berliners flocked to what was one of the most heavily guarded borders in the world and tore down parts of the Berlin Wall that had divided Germany for twenty-eight years.

  • For nearly 160 years, St. George has been known as Utah's 'Dixie.' The name is all over the city. Is it time to change?
    USA TODAY

    For nearly 160 years, St. George has been known as Utah's 'Dixie.' The name is all over the city. Is it time to change?

    It doesn't take long to notice a familiar pattern when it comes to one particular word in St. George, Utah. The word has been subject to much controversy in St. George over the years — and now the debate is back. In the wake of the death of George Floyd, which sparked a worldwide Black Lives Matter and protests against racial inequality and police brutality, there's been a renewed drive to abolish statues and symbols with ties to the Confederacy, white supremacy and historical racial violence.

  • WHO sees first results from COVID drug trials within two weeks
    Reuters

    WHO sees first results from COVID drug trials within two weeks

    The World Health Organization (WHO) should soon get results from clinical trials it is conducting of drugs that might be effective in treating COVID-19 patients, its Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said on Friday. "Nearly 5,500 patients in 39 countries have so far been recruited into the Solidarity trial," he told a news briefing, referring to clinical studies the U.N. agency is conducting. "We expect interim results within the next two weeks."

  • Two women fight for lives after driver ploughs into preparations for anti-racism rally in Seattle
    The Telegraph

    Two women fight for lives after driver ploughs into preparations for anti-racism rally in Seattle

    SEATTLE (AP) _ Two women were struck by a car whose driver sped through a protest-related closure on a freeway in Seattle, authorities said early Saturday. A 24-year-old woman from Seattle suffered critical, life-threatening injuries and a 32-year-old woman from Bellingham had serious injuries, Washington State Patrol Capt. Ron Mead said. The driver, a 27-year-old man from Seattle, was in custody, Mead said, adding that impairment was not considered a factor.

  • An antifa hoax about a 'peaceful flag burning to resist police' riled up right-wing groups in Gettysburg for no reason
    Business Insider

    An antifa hoax about a 'peaceful flag burning to resist police' riled up right-wing groups in Gettysburg for no reason

    Andrew Lichtenstein/ Corbis via Getty Images A conspiracy over a potential flag burning and children getting their faces painted by Antifa, short for "anti-fascist," drew counter-protesters to the Gettysburg battlefield days in advance for an event that never materialized. The commotion arose from a mysterious Facebook event called "Left Behind USA," which later went missing, calling for "peaceful flag burning to resist police" in the national park on July 4. A smattering of self-proclaimed oath keepers, Confederate flag bearers, and various right-wing militias descended on Gettysburg days in advance, but nothing has happened so far, and the official Antifa chapter for Central Pennsylvania h...

  • Huge bird of prey catches shark-like fish and flies off in viral video
    The Independent

    Huge bird of prey catches shark-like fish and flies off in viral video

    Visitors to a beach last week would have seen a shark-like fish soaring above their heads thanks to one bird's actions. A video shared online showed one huge predatory bird seen with what appeared to be a shark suspended in its claws above crowds at South Carolina's Myrtle Beach. The woman who witnessed the stunt, Kelly Burbage, shared the video online on Friday where she appealed for wildlife experts to name the fish and the bird.

  • India Kanpur: Eight policemen killed in clash with gang members
    BBC

    India Kanpur: Eight policemen killed in clash with gang members

    Eight Indian policemen have been killed, and seven more injured, in an encounter with gang members, reports say. The officers were fired upon during a raid in search of a notorious local gangster in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh. The gangster, Vikas Dubey, is accused in 60 criminal cases for various offences, including attempted murder.

  • There is no epidemic of fatal police shootings against unarmed Black Americans
    USA TODAY Opinion

    There is no epidemic of fatal police shootings against unarmed Black Americans

    The video of George Floyd's tragic death under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer has led many to ask whether it represents the tip of an iceberg of police brutality. For centuries, United States law enforcement was interwoven with slavery and segregation, and that memory cannot be easily erased. Much of modern policing is driven by crime data and community demands for help.

  • July 4th military flyovers to go over DC, 4 other cities
    Associated Press

    July 4th military flyovers to go over DC, 4 other cities

    President Donald Trump's July Fourth celebration will feature an extensive U.S. military air show over Washington, D.C., but four other cities will get mini-versions of the air power display on Saturday, The "Salute to the Great Cities of the American Revolution" will feature military flyovers in Boston, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. While the flights will likely be visible from a number of locations in the cities, they are taking place as Americans deal with surging cases of COVID-19 and mixed messages on the need for masks and social distancing.

  • Russia Has a Nuclear Missile That Can Kill Nearly Anything on the Planet
    The National Interest

    Russia Has a Nuclear Missile That Can Kill Nearly Anything on the Planet

    Here's What You Need To Remember: Despite the date of entry being pushed back, once the Sarmat is operational, it will be fearsome—it reportedly has a range of 18,000 kilometers, or just over 11,000 miles, which would put virtually any location on the globe within range. Russia inherited a missile collection from the Soviet Union that is rival to none—arguably bigger in type and overall diversity than any other nation's missile arsenal. Although some of their intercontinental missiles are beginning to show their age, their newest, the Sarmat, would be quite dangerous.

  • Army IDs Fort Hood soldier who killed himself after being questioned about Vanessa Guillen
    USA TODAY

    Army IDs Fort Hood soldier who killed himself after being questioned about Vanessa Guillen

    U.S. Army officials at Fort Hood on Thursday identified the soldier who killed himself this week after he was questioned about possible involvement in the disappearance of Spc. Aaron David Robinson of Illinois, who was assigned to a building adjacent to where Guillen worked, ran away from Fort Hood on Tuesday night after officials said they found partial human remains near the Leon River. Local law enforcement later found Robinson in the 4700 block of East Rancier Avenue, east of Fort Hood near North Twin Creek Drive, where he pulled a gun and shot himself early Wednesday.

  • 3 police officers have been fired over a photo in which cops took a selfie reenacting the chokehold used on Elijah McClain
    INSIDER

    3 police officers have been fired over a photo in which cops took a selfie reenacting the chokehold used on Elijah McClain

    Family photo/Handout via REUTERS Three Aurora, Colorado, police officers have been fired over a photograph that was taken near a memorial for 23-year-old Elijah McClain last year. The photo featured officers Jaron Jones, Erica Marrero, and Kyle Dittrich, smiling and reenacting the chokehold that the police used on McClain before he died. The officers had sent the picture to Jason Rosenblatt, one of three officers involved in McClain's death.