More than 90% of issues in Nile dam negotiations resolved, AU chief says

African Union Chairperson Moussa Faki Mahamat arrives to attend a visit and a dinner at the Orsay Museum in Paris

ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) - More than 90% of issues in the tripartite negotiations on the giant Nile dam between Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan have been resolved, the African Union Commission Chair Moussa Faki Mahamat said in a statement on Saturday.

The African Union has two weeks to help broker a deal to end a decade-long dispute over water supplies.

The statement said a committee composed of representatives of the three countries, South Africa and technical personnel from the African Union would work to resolve the outstanding legal and technical issues.

The committee will issue a report on the progress of the negotiations in a week.

(This story refiles to fix typo and dropped word in paragraph 3.)






(Reporting by Giulia Paravicini; Editing by Alison Williams)

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