Mowing their fields is therapeutic for high school baseball coaches

Eric Sondheimer
Birmingham baseball coach Matt Mowry has plenty of free time to mow the infield.  (Eric Sondheimer / Los Angeles Times)

Mowing the lawn used to be punishment imposed by parents when kids were growing up and misbehaving. How times have changed.

In this month of sports suspension because of COVID-19, high school baseball coaches around Southern California are finding mowing their fields is better than paying for therapy.

"It's like music to your ears," Lake Balboa Birmingham coach Matt Mowry said on his deserted field this week under overcast skies as he mowed his infield grass. "Nothing like on a nice quiet day the sound of a lawn mower humming, knowing you're going to get some nicely made lines."

Coaches don't know when or if their seasons will resume but they continue to make sure their fields are ready should games be allowed to return.

"You take pride in the facility," Mowry said.

Coaches around the Southland continue to let people know they are taking care of their fields. They are obsessed to compete among each other to make their field the best.