MSU President responds to dropped investigation

Michigan State University's president is responding to criticism about the decision to drop an internal investigation about how the university handled the aftermath of the Larry Nassar sex abuse scandal.

  • 2020 Vision Monday: Polls show a 17-point swing toward impeaching Trump, which could drag down his reelection bid
    Yahoo News

    2020 Vision Monday: Polls show a 17-point swing toward impeaching Trump, which could drag down his reelection bid

    As of three weeks ago, a majority of Americans — 51.1 percent, on average — opposed impeaching President Trump. As of today, opposition to impeachment has plummeted 7 percentage points (to 44 percent) and support has climbed nearly 10 points (to 49.8 percent), according to FiveThirtyEight's preliminary polling tracker. It still seems unlikely, although perhaps slightly less so, that Senate Republicans will ever abandon Trump and vote to remove him from office, even if most voters eventually want them to.

  • Nigerian police rescue 67 from 'inhuman' conditions at Islamic 'school'
    Reuters

    Nigerian police rescue 67 from 'inhuman' conditions at Islamic 'school'

    Police in northern Nigeria rescued nearly 70 men and boys from a second purported Islamic school where they were shackled and subjected to "inhuman and degrading treatments." The raid in Katsina, the northwestern home state of President Muhammadu Buhari, came less than a month after about 300 men and boys were freed from another supposed Islamic school in neighboring Kaduna state where they were allegedly tortured and sexually abused. "In the course of investigation, sixty-seven persons from the ages of 7 to 40 years were found shackled with chains," Katsina police spokesman Sanusi Buba said in a statement.

  • Flooded bullet trains show Japan's risks from disasters
    Associated Press

    Flooded bullet trains show Japan's risks from disasters

    Experts say they also instill a false sense of security in a country inured to danger by the constant threat of calamitous earthquakes, tsunami and volcanos. "Weather conditions in Japan up to now have been relatively moderate," said Toshitaka Katada, a disaster expert and professor at the University of Tokyo. Those days are over, and Japan's readiness for disasters, still based on data collected decades ago, hasn't kept up with the times, he said.

  • Bloomberg

    Mexico Ambush Kills 14 Cops in Deadliest Attack of AMLO's Tenure

    Fourteen Mexican police were killed in the western state of Michoacan in the biggest attack on law enforcement since President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador took office. The slaying occurred in Aguililla, a town of about 15,000, Mexico's Ministry of Security and Citizen Protection said on Twitter on Monday. Officers were ambushed at the entrance of the town by men in armored trucks, possibly members of the Jalisco New Generation cartel, one of Mexico's most powerful and violent groups, according to TV network Televisa, which broadcast images of burning vehicles at the side of a road.

  • In Jamal Khashoggi's death, Saudi money is talking louder than murder
    USA TODAY Opinion

    In Jamal Khashoggi's death, Saudi money is talking louder than murder

    Anyone interested in what it looks like to get away with murder should peruse the attendee list for Saudi Arabia's flashy "Davos in the Desert" this month. Vaporizing into the desert heat is all the righteous alarm that compelled leading financial firms to boycott the event last year out of concern that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, weeks before, had ordered the grisly killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. Attending this year's extravaganza are executives of JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs and Citigroup, all of them institutions selected to underwrite the kingdom's highly anticipated, partial public offering of its oil company, Aramco, valued $1.5 trillion to $2 trillion.

  • Disney Skyliner reopens with modified hours after stranding passengers last week
    USA TODAY

    Disney Skyliner reopens with modified hours after stranding passengers last week

    Disney's Skyliner is up and running again with modified service after the new aerial cable car system stranded passengers for hours the night of Oct. 5. "Beginning today, guests may travel aboard Disney Skyliner from 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.," reads an update on Walt Disney World Resort's Skyliner landing page. "Following a complete review with the manufacturer, we've made adjustments to our processes and training, and we are improving how we communicate with guests during their flight with Disney Skyliner," Thomas Smith, editorial content director at Disney Parks, wrote in a blog post on Monday.

  • Climate change researchers recommend banning all frequent flyer reward programs to cut carbon emissions by targeting jet-setters
    Business Insider

    Climate change researchers recommend banning all frequent flyer reward programs to cut carbon emissions by targeting jet-setters

    A new report commissioned by the Committee on Climate Change, the UK government's official climate-change advisers, has called for a ban on all frequent flyer reward programs to discourage people from traveling by air so much. Researchers from Imperial College London, who wrote the report, said that just 15% of the entire British population take 70% of all flights from the country. The report also called for an "air miles levy" to punish people who fly long distances, which would target those who rack up the most air miles, rather than people who travel shorter distances.

  • View Photos of Our Sports Sedan Battle Between the Dodge Charger and Kia Stinger GT
    Car and Driver

    View Photos of Our Sports Sedan Battle Between the Dodge Charger and Kia Stinger GT

    America's leading (and only) V-8 muscle sedan takes on Korea's upstart rear-drive hatchback in a battle of power versus poise. From Car and Driver

  • California becomes first US state to push back school start time
    AFP

    California becomes first US state to push back school start time

    California has become the first state in the country to push back start times at most public schools in the hope the measure will help adolescents perform better in class. The new law signed on Sunday by Governor Gavin Newsom calls for middle schools to ring in classes no earlier than 8:00 am and high schools no earlier than 8:30 am. The measure would become effective by July 1, 2022 or when a school district's three-year bargaining agreement that is operative on January 1, 2020, expires.

  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez faces backlash over haircut
    Yahoo News Video

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez faces backlash over haircut

    This week, the Washington Times published a story saying that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y. had spent $80 on a haircut and $180 on color at a Washington, D.C., salon, a choice the newspaper presented as hypocritical, given she “regularly rails against the rich and complains about the cost of living inside the Beltway.

  • White House: Trump 'strongly condemns' parody video of him shooting critics and media outlets in church
    Yahoo News

    White House: Trump 'strongly condemns' parody video of him shooting critics and media outlets in church

    The White House on Monday tried to distance itself from a violent parody video that shows President Trump shooting and stabbing critics and members of the media in a church. “But based upon everything he has heard, he strongly condemns this video,” Grisham tweeted. According to the New York Times, the crude video was shown at a pro-Trump conference at the president's Doral Miami resort over the weekend, where Donald Trump Jr. and former White House press secretary Sarah Sanders were among the guest speakers.

  • Hong Kong's leader: Territory not becoming a police state
    Associated Press

    Hong Kong's leader: Territory not becoming a police state

    Hong Kong's leader said Tuesday that "it's totally irresponsible and unfounded" to suggest the semi-autonomous Chinese territory is becoming a police state as her government grapples with protests now in their fifth month. In a spirited defense of Hong Kong's 30,000-strong police force and her handling of the protests in response to criticism from visiting U.S. senators, Carrie Lam challenged the notion that the territory is losing its freedoms, unique in China, as police battle demonstrators in the streets. "I would challenge every politician to ask themselves if the large extent of violent acts, and all those petrol bombs and arson and deadly attacks on policemen, happened in their own country, what would they do?

  • Anthony Scaramucci is desperately trying to recruit Mitt Romney for a 2020 run
    The Week

    Anthony Scaramucci is desperately trying to recruit Mitt Romney for a 2020 run

    Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) is running for president again — at least in Anthony Scaramucci's dreams. The famously short-lived White House communications director has since turned on the president who appointed him, and has publicly said he's trying to knock President Trump off the 2020 ticket. Now, it seems Scaramucci has decided on his dream candidate, and has launched a website and line of T-shirts to persuade him to run.

  • Soldier wounded during search for Bowe Bergdahl dies of his injuries
    The Telegraph

    Soldier wounded during search for Bowe Bergdahl dies of his injuries

    A US soldier shot in the head during the 2009 search for army deserter Bowe Bergdahl has died from his injuries. Army Master Sgt. Mark Allen died on Saturday at the age of 46, 10 years after being injured in the hunt for his missing comrade. He spent 21 years in the army and national guard, and retired in 2013 on receiving the Purple Heart.

  • When police misconduct occurs, records often stay secret. One mom's fight to change that.
    USA TODAY

    When police misconduct occurs, records often stay secret. One mom's fight to change that.

    Furious about the way she was treated, she worked with other families whose relatives were killed by police to help push for the recent passage of California's new Senate Bill 1421, which as of January 1 overrides decades of precedent and requires police departments to open internal investigation records related to deadly force and police wrongdoing. The law could inspire reform at police departments across the nation at a time when the relationship between police and the public is fraught with tension following numerous fatal shootings, particularly involving victims of color.

  • The National Interest

    With Hypersonic Missiles, Israel's F-35s Are Upping The Ante In Syria

    Key point: The Middle East's skies belong to Israel. Israel will soon have a new precision-guided supersonic stand-off missile for its F-35s and other fighter jets. The new missile was announced on June 11, 2018 in a press release by two leading Israeli defense firms, Israeli Military Industries Systems (IMI Systems) and Israel Aerospace Industries, which jointly developed the missile.

  • 'Do the right thing,' family of UK teen killed in crash tells U.S. diplomat's wife
    Reuters

    'Do the right thing,' family of UK teen killed in crash tells U.S. diplomat's wife

    The parents of a British teenager killed in a car crash involving a U.S. diplomat's wife vowed on Monday to keep fighting until they get justice for their son after the American woman returned to the United States following the accident. Charlotte Charles and Tim Dunn spoke to media in New York during a visit intended put pressure on the Trump administration to have Anne Sacoolas to be sent back to face British investigators. "She needs to just do the right thing and just come back and face what she's done," said Charles, her voice breaking with emotion.

  • Russia denies US news report it bombed 4 Syria hospitals in 12 hours
    AFP

    Russia denies US news report it bombed 4 Syria hospitals in 12 hours

    Russia on Monday denied a US newspaper report that its warplanes bombed four hospitals in rebel-held territory in Syria over a period of 12 hours this year. The Russian defence ministry rubbished the claim in a report by The New York Times, saying "the alleged 'evidence' provided by the NYT is not worth even the paper it was printed on". The May strikes -- which the newspaper tied to Moscow through Russian radio recordings, plane spotter logs and accounts by witnesses -- are part of a larger pattern of medical facilities targeted by forces supporting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in the country's devastating civil war.

  • Court Ruling Extends Vote Protest of Philippine Marcos’ Son
    Bloomberg

    Court Ruling Extends Vote Protest of Philippine Marcos’ Son

    The Philippines' top court on Tuesday decided to release the initial results of the vice-presidential vote recount, which the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos' son said will delay his chance to assume the post. Former Senator Ferdinand Marcos Jr. said he is “frustrated” by the court's decision not to resolve his election protest against Vice President Leni Robredo victory in the 2016 polls. Robredo is already halfway through her six-year term.

  • 7 Indigenous Pioneers You Need to Know
    Popular Mechanics

    7 Indigenous Pioneers You Need to Know

    These doctors, scientists, and activists have all paved an inspiring path. From Popular Mechanics

  • Warren joins Buttigieg in nixing threat to church tax status
    Associated Press

    Warren joins Buttigieg in nixing threat to church tax status

    Elizabeth Warren would not seek to revoke the tax-exempt status of churches or other religious entities that decline to perform same-sex marriages if she's elected president, the Massachusetts Democrat's campaign said. Asked to respond to former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke's assertion last week that religious institutions should face the loss of their tax exemption for opposing same-sex marriage, Warren campaign spokeswoman Saloni Sharma said that "Elizabeth will stand shoulder to shoulder with the LGBTQ+ community" to help stamp out "fear of discrimination and violence." But she declined to take aim at the tax status of religious organizations that don't support same-sex marriage.

  • The Independent

    Son of sheriff who called immigrants ‘drunks’ at White House event arrested for public intoxication

    The son of a Texas sheriff who used a White House press conference to describe immigrant offenders as “drunks” likely to repeatedly break the law has been arrested for public intoxication. Sergei Waybourn, 24, faces a count of indecent exposure as well as public drunkenness just days after his father, Tarrant County Sheriff Bill Waybourn, was criticised for the comments. Responding to a California court ruling that banned immigration officers from arresting people on the basis of records that have been proven unreliable, Sheriff Waybourn said 7% of his 4,200 inmates were “illegal aliens”.

  • States are cutting university budgets. Taxpayers aren't interested in funding campus kooks
    USA TODAY Opinion

    States are cutting university budgets. Taxpayers aren't interested in funding campus kooks

    Times are bad for higher education, and higher educators are beginning to notice it. But the industry's problems are mostly of its own making. The latest "cri de coeur" comes from University of North Dakota's Sheila Liming, who writes, “My University is Dying; And soon yours will be, too.

  • We found 85,000 cops who’ve been investigated for misconduct. Now you can read their records.
    USA TODAY

    We found 85,000 cops who’ve been investigated for misconduct. Now you can read their records.

    At least 85,000 law enforcement officers across the USA have been investigated or disciplined for misconduct over the past decade, an investigation by USA TODAY Network found. Despite their role as public servants, the men and women who swear an oath to keep communities safe can generally avoid public scrutiny for their misdeeds. The records of their misconduct are filed away, rarely seen by anyone outside their departments.

  • Meet the Massive Ordnance Penetrator: The Air Force's Newest Bunker Buster Bomb
    The National Interest

    Meet the Massive Ordnance Penetrator: The Air Force's Newest Bunker Buster Bomb

    Key point: The MOP bomb will increase the firepower and options of the Air Force. EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. The U.S. Air Force is asking the Boeing Co.to build additional Massive Ordnance Penetrator bunker-busting super bombs under terms of a $70 million contract announced last week.