Myanmar security forces 'open fire at funeral'

In Myanmar on Sunday (March 28) it was time to bury the dead after the bloodiest day of violence since protests began two months ago.

But since the country's military coup - even mourning loved ones is no longer safe.

Troops opened fire at a funeral in the town of Bago, witnesses said.

A woman called Aye was at the service for Thae Maung Maung, a 20-year-old student who was shot on Saturday (March 27).

She said they were singing a revolutionary song, when the security forces arrived and opened fire.

There were no immediate reports of casualties from that incident.

Ceremonies were being held across Myanmar on Sunday for the 114 people killed the day before.

There were no reports of large-scale protests in Yangon or second city Mandalay, which bore the brunt of Saturday's casualties.

The bloodshed drew renewed condemnation from the West. U.N. Special Rapporteur on Myanmar Tom Andrews said the army was carrying out "mass murder".

He called on the world to isolate the junta, cutting off its funding and halting access to weapons.

"Words of condemnation or concern are frankly ringing hollow to the people of Myanmar", he said.

Among the dead, at least six children aged between 10 and 16, according to news reports and witnesses.

In Yangon, 13-year-old boy Sai Wai Yan was being remembered.

His mother is saying "mom is calling you, can't you hear me? How can I live without you."

Video Transcript

- In Myanmar on Sunday, it was time to bury the dead after the bloodiest day of violence since protests began two months ago. But after the country's military coup, even mourning loved ones is no longer safe. Troops opened fire at a funeral in the town of Bago, witnesses said. A woman killed Aye was at the service for Thae Maung Maung, a 20-year-old student who was shot on Saturday. She said there were singing a revolutionary song when the security forces arrived and opened fire. There were no immediate reports of casualties from that incident.

Ceremonies were being held across Myanmar on Sunday after 114 people were killed the day before. There were no reports of large-scale protests in Yangon or second city, Mandalay which bore the brunt of Saturday's casualties. The bloodshed drew renewed condemnation from the West. UN Special Rapporteur on Myanmar Tom Andrews said the Army was carrying out mass murder. He called on the world to isolate the junta, cutting off its funding and halting access to weapons. "Words of condemnation or concern are frankly ringing hollow to the people of Myanmar," he said.

Among the dead on Saturday, at least six children aged between 10 and 16, according to news reports and witnesses. In Yangon, 13-year-old boy Sai Wai Yan was being remembered. His mother is saying "mom is calling you, can't you hear me? How can I live without you?"