'Myself, personally, I wouldn't go to a restaurant' -Fauci

Fauci said on CBS’ “Face the Nation” that he himself would not go to a restaurant.

“You should avoid crowded places,” Fauci said.

With limited testing available, officials have recorded nearly 3,000 cases and 59 deaths in the United States.

  • A national lockdown to stop coronavirus? Trump is 'thinking about doing that'
    Yahoo News

    A national lockdown to stop coronavirus? Trump is 'thinking about doing that'

    President Trump shied away Wednesday from issuing domestic travel restrictions or a national lockdown to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic that, in a best-case scenario, is expected to kill between 100,000 and 240,000 Americans. Asked at a White House briefing if he was considering limiting domestic air travel, Trump said he was thinking about it, a phrase he frequently applies to subjects he wishes to avoid discussing. We're thinking about doing that, but at the same time we just, to start these airlines and to start this whole thing over again is very tough, John [Roberts, Fox News reporter].

  • Two years before coronavirus, CDC warned of a coming pandemic
    Yahoo News

    Two years before coronavirus, CDC warned of a coming pandemic

    Two years ago, some of the nation's top public health officials gathered in an auditorium at Emory University in Atlanta to commemorate the 1918 influenza pandemic — also known as “the Spanish flu” — which had killed as many as 40 million people as it swept the globe. Implicit was the understanding that while the 1918 pandemic was a singular catastrophe, conditions in the 21st century were ideal for another outbreak. Long before the coronavirus emerged in Wuhan, China, and then soon spread to nearly every country on Earth, the 2018 conference offered proof that epidemiologists at the CDC and other institutions were aware that a new pandemic was poised to strike.

  • Flattening the curve on coronavirus: What California and Washington can teach the world
    Yahoo News

    Flattening the curve on coronavirus: What California and Washington can teach the world

    Washington state, early, about two weeks before New York or New Jersey ... California, a week before New York or New Jersey, really talked to their communities and decided to mitigate before they started seeing this number of cases. And now we know that makes a big difference.

  • Navy fires captain who sought help for virus-stricken ship
    Associated Press

    Navy fires captain who sought help for virus-stricken ship

    The captain of a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier facing a growing outbreak of the coronavirus on his ship was fired by Navy leaders who said he created a panic by sending his memo pleading for help to too many people. Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly said the ship's commander, Capt. Brett Crozier, “demonstrated extremely poor judgment” in the middle of a crisis. Modly's decision to remove Crozier as ship commander was immediately condemned by members of the House Armed Services Committee, who called it a “destabilizing move” that will “likely put our service members at greater risk and jeopardize our fleet's readiness."

  • The IRS will reportedly begin issuing $1,200 stimulus payments on April 9, but some Americans could wait up to 5 months to receive their check
    Business Insider

    The IRS will reportedly begin issuing $1,200 stimulus payments on April 9, but some Americans could wait up to 5 months to receive their check

    The IRS plans to begin sending out coronavirus stimulus payments as soon as April 9, according to an internal distribution plan obtained by The Washington Post. Electronic payments could be sent out next Thursday, the internal document said, but paper checks are set to be mailed out to Americans on a weekly rotation beginning later. About 145 million Americans can expect cash meant to support those who have been affected by the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic, with about 6.6 million people filing for unemployment last week alone.

  • China's Shenzhen bans the eating of cats and dogs after coronavirus
    Reuters

    China's Shenzhen bans the eating of cats and dogs after coronavirus

    The Chinese city of Shenzhen has banned the eating of dogs and cats as part of a wider clampdown on the wildlife trade since the emergence of the new coronavirus. Scientists suspect the coronavirus passed to humans from animals. Some of the earliest infections were found in people who had exposure to a wildlife market in the central city of Wuhan, where bats, snakes, civets and other animals were sold.

  • Birx: 5 states could be among next coronavirus 'hot spots'
    Yahoo News Video

    Birx: 5 states could be among next coronavirus 'hot spots'

    Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, listed several states that could be the next “hot spots” for large numbers of COVID-19 cases, based on how many positive cases they have now.

  • ‘We Didn’t Know That Until the Last 24 Hours’: Georgia Gov. Says He Just Found Out People without Symptoms Can Spread Coronavirus
    National Review

    ‘We Didn’t Know That Until the Last 24 Hours’: Georgia Gov. Says He Just Found Out People without Symptoms Can Spread Coronavirus

    While announcing a statewide shelter-in-place order on Wednesday, Georgia governor Brian Kemp, a Republican, said that he had just been informed that asymptomatic individuals could spread the coronavirus. The illness “is now transmitting before people see signs….Those individuals could have been infecting people before they ever felt [symptoms],” Kemp said at a press conference. It has been widely known for months that the coronavirus can spread through asymptomatic transmission.

  • Coronavirus map of the US: latest cases state by state
    The Guardian

    Coronavirus map of the US: latest cases state by state

    The number of confirmed cases of Covid-19 continues to grow in the US. Mike Pence, the vice-president, is overseeing the US response to the coronavirus. So far, 80% of patients experience a mild form of the illness, which can include a fever and pneumonia, and many of these cases require little to no medical intervention.

  • Joe Biden and Donald Trump Plan Perfect Phone Call
    The Daily Beast

    Joe Biden and Donald Trump Plan Perfect Phone Call

    Just when it seemed things couldn't get more surreal in the 2020 campaign, it appeared on Thursday that President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden were headed for a phone call to discuss the response to the coronavirus crisis. Addressing a reporter's question if Trump would be open to such a conversation, the president said during Wednesday's press briefing that he would “absolutely” take Biden's call if he were to ring him. “I'd love to speak to him, sure," said Trump, who, despite routinely mocking the presumptive Democratic nominee's mental acuity and tagging him, for months, as “sleepy Joe,” said he's “always found him to be a nice guy.”

  • Coronavirus poses special risk to millions of Americans with diabetes
    Yahoo News

    Coronavirus poses special risk to millions of Americans with diabetes

    As the worsening coronavirus pandemic continues to spread across the country, millions of Americans living with diabetes face heightened risks from COVID-19. Around 30 million Americans have diabetes, mostly of the type II (previously called “adult-onset”) variety. A quarter of U.S. adults with diabetes are over 65, an age that has been shown to delineate increased COVID-19 mortality rates.

  • 'Act as though it's going to be a lot longer': American in Wuhan warns U.S. over lockdowns
    NBC News

    'Act as though it's going to be a lot longer': American in Wuhan warns U.S. over lockdowns

    An American who spent more than two months locked down in the Chinese city of Wuhan, where the coronavirus epidemic first emerged, is urging people back home to prepare for a lengthy interruption to their lives. “Don't go into this thinking it's going to be over in a few weeks,” Benjamin Wilson told NBC News from his apartment in Wuhan where he and his family spent eight weeks in confinement. After initially experiencing problems getting evacuated back to the U.S., Wilson, 38, chose to stay in the city where he has lived for more than 16 years, with his Chinese wife, Li Qin, and seven-year-old daughter Jasmin as it went into lockdown in late January.

  • "Shoot them dead": Duterte orders police to kill Filipinos who defy coronavirus lockdown
    CBS News

    "Shoot them dead": Duterte orders police to kill Filipinos who defy coronavirus lockdown

    Despite that, many in a Manila slum took to the streets Wednesday to protest a lack of supplies, arguing they had not received any food packs since the lockdown started two weeks ago. "I will not hesitate my soldiers to shoot you," Duterte said in forceful tones Wednesday. On Thursday, as often happens after Duterte makes these sorts of inflammatory public remarks, Filipino officials rushed to insist that the president was simply using hyperbole to communicate the gravity of the situation.

  • Elon Musk says the hospitals he sent medical machines to all confirmed they were 'critical' and traditional ventilators are arriving shortly
    Business Insider

    Elon Musk says the hospitals he sent medical machines to all confirmed they were 'critical' and traditional ventilators are arriving shortly

    REUTERS/Mike Blake/File Picture Elon Musk was criticized on Thursday for apparently sending BiPAP machines, not the life-support ventilators most-needed to save coronavirus patients, to a New York hospital. New York City Hospitals thanked Musk and Tesla in a tweet for sending "40 ventilators" to a hospital in Queens, but the photo appears to show a BiPAP machine, which is more commonly used for sleep apnea. Some medical experts have warned that CPAP and BiPAP machines could be harmful in treating coronavirus patients by potentially spreading the disease.

  • Pakistan worshippers clash with police trying to enforce coronavirus lockdown
    Reuters

    Pakistan worshippers clash with police trying to enforce coronavirus lockdown

    Pakistani Muslims at a Karachi mosque clashed with baton-wielding police trying to enforce new curbs on gatherings to prevent Friday prayers and contain coronavirus infections, officials said. TV footage showed dozens of people chasing two police vehicles and pelting them with stones as an officer fired in the air to disperse the crowd. After failing to persuade worshippers to pray at home last week, the government in Pakistan's southern province of Sindh, home to the financial hub of Karachi, enforced a lockdown for three hours beginning at noon on Friday, officials said.

  • Shenzhen becomes first Chinese city to ban eating cats and dogs
    BBC

    Shenzhen becomes first Chinese city to ban eating cats and dogs

    Shenzhen has become the first Chinese city to ban the sale and consumption of dog and cat meat. It comes after the coronavirus outbreak was linked to wildlife meat, prompting Chinese authorities to ban the trade and consumption of wild animals. Shenzhen went a step further, extending the ban to dogs and cats.

  • 10 Great Deals on Apparel From REI’s 25% off Sale
    Popular Mechanics

    10 Great Deals on Apparel From REI’s 25% off Sale

    Act fast to score discounts on Patagonia, Nike, Smartwool, and more. From Popular Mechanics

  • CDC reportedly set to recommend everyone wear face masks outside
    The Week

    CDC reportedly set to recommend everyone wear face masks outside

    New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio issued a recommendation Thursday to wear face coverings when going outside, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reportedly set to do the same. The public should use homemade cloth face coverings when outside and reserve medical-grade masks for health care workers, a draft CDC document obtained by Stat News reveals. A CDC official later told The New York Times the same guidance would soon be issued.

  • Trump warns Iran against attacking US troops in Iraq
    Associated Press

    Trump warns Iran against attacking US troops in Iraq

    President Donald Trump said Wednesday that Tehran should expect a bold U.S. response if Iran or Iranian-backed groups attack American forces or assets in Iraq. U.S.-Iran tensions soared following the Jan. 3 Washington-directed strike that killed Iranian Gen. Qassim Soleimani outside Baghdad airport. Trump said at an evening White House briefing that his administration has received intelligence that Iran is planning a strike, but did not provide additional details.

  • Dr. Fauci Shuts Down ‘Fox & Friends’ on Coronavirus Cure: ‘We Don’t Operate on How You Feel’
    The Daily Beast

    Dr. Fauci Shuts Down ‘Fox & Friends’ on Coronavirus Cure: ‘We Don’t Operate on How You Feel’

    Top infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci left the hosts of Fox & Friends disappointed and frustrated Friday when he threw cold water on their insistence that the anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine is a game-changing cure for the coronavirus. Citing a recent poll showing that 37 percent of doctors around the world feel the drug is currently the most effective treatment of COVID-19, co-host Steve Doocy added that frequent Fox News guest Dr. Mehmet Oz recently touted a small Chinese study that found the drug had some efficacy in treating the virus. Doocy went on to play a clip of Dr. Oz wondering whether Fauci was impressed with the results of that study.

  • Business owners criticize Japanese government's 'slow' response to coronavirus
    NBC News

    Business owners criticize Japanese government's 'slow' response to coronavirus

    The Olympics may have been postponed and the number of coronavirus cases is rising, but the Japanese government has not declared a state of emergency or ordered lockdown measures like those implemented in New York, California and countries such as China, Italy and Spain. Businesses, bars and restaurants remain open in Japan and residents can, for the most part, move freely, leading some to express their unease at their government's “slow” reaction to the pandemic. “The Japanese government is really slow,” hair stylist Natsumi Makino, who works at Hair Salon Nalu in Tokyo's Shibuya ward, said.

  • Mexico murder rate reaches new high as violence rages amid Covid-19 spread
    The Guardian

    Mexico murder rate reaches new high as violence rages amid Covid-19 spread

    Mexico's homicide rate raced to a new record in March, as violence raged even as Covid-19 spread across the country and authorities urged the population to stay home and practise social distancing. Mexico registered 2,585 homicides in March – the highest monthly figure since records began in 1997 – putting 2020 on track to break last year's record total for murders. The surge in killings comes as federal and state officials put resources into containing the Covid-19 crisis and confront the prospect of an already sluggish economy falling even further – potentially deepening the misery for the more than 40% of the population living in poverty.

  • World leaders say they have so far failed to identify a single coronavirus antibody test which is accurate enough for use
    Business Insider

    World leaders say they have so far failed to identify a single coronavirus antibody test which is accurate enough for use

    G7 leaders on Friday discussed the search for a home coronavirus antibody test that could allow an early exit from the international COVID-19 lockdown. The tests are designed to detect whether somebody has ever contracted the coronavirus. If successful, such tests could allow the roll-out of so-called "immunity passports" allowing people to leave the coronavirus lockdown early.

  • Latest on the spread of the coronavirus around the world
    Reuters

    Latest on the spread of the coronavirus around the world

    Cases rose by 6,156, compared with the previous day and the death toll climbed by 140. Italy will extend lockdown restrictions to April 13, as data from this week suggests a slowdown of growth in total cases, though its national health institute says official death toll could be underestimated. Cases in Spain topped 100,000 on Wednesday, and two planes with protective equipment arrived to restock an overloaded public health system.

  • Coronavirus: 'I don't want a flight voucher, where's my refund?'
    BBC

    Coronavirus: 'I don't want a flight voucher, where's my refund?'

    Frustrated customers are demanding that airlines make it easier to claim a refund for flights cancelled owing to the coronavirus outbreak. But the airlines' trade body wants the right to give vouchers, not refunds. Hundreds of flights have been cancelled as fleets are grounded and the process of reimbursing people is under strain.