N.Y. Gov. Andrew Cuomo's Covid book deal worth more than $5.1 million

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is being paid more than $5.1 million for his book on leadership during the coronavirus crisis, his office said Monday.

The Democratic governor and his office had for months refused to disclose how much he was paid for the book "American Crisis: Leadership Lessons from the Covid-19 Pandemic."

State Attorney General Letitia James' office has been investigating whether the governor misused state resources to write and promote the book.

The governor's office released the book deal information Monday, when Cuomo released his taxes and filed his state financial disclosure form.

"The notable change from year to year is income from 'American Crisis,'" Cuomo's director of communications, Rich Azzopardi, said in a statement.

He said Cuomo was paid $3.12 million last year, and will be paid another $2 million over the next two years.

‎"Net income from the $3,120,000 million payment less expenses and taxes is $1,537,508," Azzopardi said.

Of the remaining $1.5 million, Cuomo "donated a third to the United Way of New York State for state-wide COVID relief and vaccination effort, and is giving the remainder in a trust for his three daughters equally who worked with the Governor during this pandemic and did what he calls ‘tireless and effective work for all New Yorkers’ and gave him ‘the strength and love to make it through the crisis every day,’" Azzopardi said.

The sum Cuomo is getting from Crown publishing far exceeds the $225,000-a-year salary he makes as governor.

The book, which went on sale in October, has also landed Cuomo in legal trouble.

Last month, the state comptroller's office authorized the state A.G. to investigate whether Cuomo used staffers and state resources to assist in writing the book, which is prohibited by state law.

Cuomo has insisted that any work by state employees on the book was voluntary. A spokesman has said any work on the book was "in compliance with state ethics laws and done on their personal time."

James's office is also investigating multiple sexual harassment allegations against the third-term governor.

Cuomo has denied touching anyone inappropriately, but acknowledged that he may have acted in ways that made people feel uncomfortable. He initially said that was unintentional and apologized, but has more recently said he'd done nothing wrong. He's pushed back against calls from the vast majority of New York's congressional delegation that he resign, saying he won't bow to "cancel culture."