Naomi Osaka said she switched from eating Japanese to Greek food the day before matches and now thinks it's a good omen

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Scott Davis
·2 min read
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naomi osaka
Naomi Osaka. Andy Cheung/Getty Images
  • Naomi Osaka beat Serena Williams to advance to the Australian Open final.

  • After the match, Osaka said she randomly switched from eating Japanese food the day before matches to eating Greek food.

  • Osaka said after the switch, Stefanos Tsitsipas, who is Greek, beat Rafa Nadal in the men's semifinal, leading Osaka to believe it was a good omen.

  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.

Naomi Osaka made a small switch to her routine that may have helped her land in the Australian Open final: she started eating Greek food.

Osaka defeated Serena Williams in straight sets in the semifinal on Thursday to advance to the final. In a post-match interview, Osaka joked that a switch from Japanese food to Greek, followed by Stefanos Tsitsipas' comeback win over Rafa Nadal in the men's semifinal, must have been a good omen.

"It's super weird, I have this story," Osaka said. "Last night - well, for the past three weeks I've been eating Japanese food on the day before my match. And yesterday, I decided to eat Greek food.

"So, then, I went to sleep and I woke up, and [Tsitsipas] had beat Nadal, so I'm like, 'Oh, maybe this is a sign. Maybe I should keep eating Greek food.'"

Osaka's comments drew laughs from the Australian Open crowd.

As the interviewer noted, Osaka was in the right Australian city to eat Greek food - Melbourne has a large Greek population.

Tsitsipas, who is Greek, defeated Nadal in five sets on Monday, coming back from a two-set deficit.

Tsitsipas saw the quote and responded on Twitter with emojis.

Osaka is on the verge of her third career major - any change in food routines at this stage might be risky.

Read the original article on Insider