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NCAA admits discrepancy in men's and women's amenities

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March Madness tips off with controversy over discrepancies in amenities for the men's and women's tournaments. Vladimir Duthiers takes a look.

Video Transcript

NORAH O'DONNELL: All right. Turning now to March Madness because it is in full swing. Players are being tested daily and living in a COVID bubble. But tonight, there are questions about the facilities and the food given to the female athletes compared to the men's teams. We have more now from CBS's Vladimir Duthiers.

VLADIMIR DUTHIERS: Another year of March Madness is finally here.

- It's an easy lay in.

VLADIMIR DUTHIERS: The games hit full swing just as the NCAA was forced to admit a discrepancy in amenities for the men's versus the women's tournament. WNBA star Sabrina Ionescu, last year's NCAA player of the year, tweeted this photo showing a better equipped weight room for the men's teams. "Thought this was a joke," she said. In response, the NCAA said, "this is due to the limited space. We are actively working to enhance existing resources."

- It looks like we got some kind of meat here.

VLADIMIR DUTHIERS: But it's not just the weight rooms. There are differences in food options for the men's and women's teams as well as the difference in gift bags given to players.

- Some of the chosen ones that made it in.

VLADIMIR DUTHIERS: Meanwhile, strict COVID guidelines will make this year's games look and feel very different. There is a virtual safety bubble. Only six sites in and around Indianapolis are hosting the games with each venue limited to no more than 25% capacity.

TOM IZZO: It's just different. But it's not necessarily a bad different.

VLADIMIR DUTHIERS: It has come with a price. All 68 men's teams are tested daily. Each team is isolated on its own hotel floor. And players must wear a contact tracing device. Vladimir Duthiers, CBS News, New York.