Nearly 20K Get Coronavirus Vaccine In Maryland

Elizabeth Janney

MARYLAND — Nearly 20,000 people have gotten the COVID-19 vaccine in Maryland, state health officials reported Sunday.

As the vaccine begins to be administered to those most at risk of exposure and complications, the number of patients hospitalized in Maryland has stayed around 1,700, and the statewide positivity rate on a rolling, seven-day average has hovered between 7 and 8 percent over the last week.

"I'm pleased with where we are right now in our state," Gov. Larry Hogan said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday, Dec. 27. "Our positivity rate is better than 45 other states, and people seem to be happy with the actions we've taken."

This week Maryland nursing homes began receiving the vaccine, after front-line health care workers started getting vaccinated mid-month.

The state's vaccination plan prioritizes those most at risk of exposure and complication from the virus. First in line are hospital workers caring for and exposed to coronavirus patients; nursing home residents and staff; and first responders.

Each priority group will receive more details when the vaccine is available, state health officials said in a fact sheet about the coronavirus vaccine plan in Maryland.

Most of those who have received the vaccine so far have been in the Baltimore metro region, according to state health data, which shows as of Dec. 27 that more than 11,200 vaccine recipients have been in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford and Howard counties and Baltimore City.

Maryland Vaccination Status As Of Dec. 27:

Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.


Here is the latest coronavirus data in Maryland as of Sunday, Dec. 27:

Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.

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This article originally appeared on the Baltimore Patch