New Report Says Stonehenge Rocks Were Moved By Glaciers, Not Men

It’s a question that has plagued archaeologists and stone enthusiasts for centuries: what’s the deal with Stonehenge? 

No one has ever been quite sure where the famous circle of giant bluestones came from or how they came to be arranged in such a precise formation in the wilds of Wiltshire. 

A recent paper from researchers at UCL suggested that the stones were collected in at quarries Carn Goedog and Craig Rhos-y-felin around 5,000 years ago, then dragged from Wales to Wiltshire by men.  

But archaeologists writing the Archaeology in Wales journal says that UCL got it all wrong.  

This newer report says there are “no traces of human intervention in any of the features” that the UCL researchers “so excited”. 

Instead, the Arachaeology in Wales paper’s authors, Dr Brian John, Dr Dyfed Elis-Gruffydd and John Downes, think they have evidence that suggests the rocks were moved by glaciers. 

Accusing the UCL team of getting carried away by a good yarn, Dr John wrote, “There is substantial evidence in favour of glacial transport and zero evidence in support of the human transport theory.

“We think the archaeologists have been so keen on telling a good story here that they have ignored or misinterpreted the evidence in front of them.

“That’s very careless. They now need to undertake a complete reassessment of the material they have collected.”

Zing! 

Image: REX Shutterstock