Climate change

Climate change occurs when changes in Earth's climate system result in new weather patterns that last for at least a few decades, and maybe for millions of years. The climate system comprises five interacting parts, the atmosphere (air), hydrosphere (water), cryosphere, biosphere (living things), and lithosphere (earth's crust and upper mantle). The climate system receives nearly all of its energy from the sun, with a relatively tiny amount from earth's interior.
Keep up with the latest news and discussion about climate change.
  • ABC7 San Francisco

    Bay Area chef wins international award for climate change solutions in the kitchen

    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- ABC7 News is committed to Building a better Bay Area and one of the issues we are focusing on is the environment. On Tuesday, a San Francisco chef was awarded an international prize, that some equate to the Nobel Prize for food, for combating climate change from the kitchen. "Chefs have the potential to create significant cultural change," said Mission Chinese Food co-founder Anthony Myint. The impact of Mission Chinese Food now extends beyond San Francisco's dinner crowd-- the bold menu, a catalyst for global climate solutions. Myint was just awarded the Basque Culinary World Prize and 100,000 euros for his efforts to fight climate change through food. "Farming can reverse

  • As Cost Of Climate Crisis Grows, Climate Movement Escalates – OpEd
    Eurasia Review

    As Cost Of Climate Crisis Grows, Climate Movement Escalates – OpEd

    The warnings of climate chaos are coming so fast they are difficult to keep up with. Storms, heatwaves and climate-related weather disasters are increasing at a rapid pace. The leadership of the two corporate-dominated political parties are trying to keep the climate issue out of the 2020 campaign, but the movement is becoming too big to ignore. Climate justice protests against fossil fuel infrastructure, politicians and the media are also growing. An industry publication describes how activists are “driving pipeline rejections” reporting, “From large, interstate pipelines to small lines connecting towns and neighborhoods, anti-fossil fuel activists have proven highly successful at blocking,

  • Industry and campaigners spar over S.Africa's carbon tax
    AFP

    Industry and campaigners spar over S.Africa's carbon tax

    South Africa's new carbon tax has provoked a storm of criticism from environmental campaigners who say it is too weak -- and from industry that predicts it will cause mass job losses. The new tax, the first of its type in Africa, was cautiously introduced last month in the first of several gradual steps and is scheduled to come into full force in three years' time. Canada, France, Colombia and Sweden all have carbon taxes, with the World Bank saying a total of 46 countries now have such levies or similar schemes in place or scheduled for implementation.

  • Opinion: When it comes to climate change, is the petroleum industry the only 'bad guy'?
    TheJournal.ie

    Opinion: When it comes to climate change, is the petroleum industry the only 'bad guy'?

    RECENTLY I WAS invited onto RTÉ radio to represent the views of the Irish Petroleum Industry Association on the government's plan to halt climate change. “Are you for real RTÉ?” cried one wag on Twitter. “[We'll have] the Plutonium for Breakfast Association now with some views on cancer screening.” Sometimes, one can only concede defeat to a wittier opponent, but the comment is indicative of a much wider misguided view that the petroleum industry should have no part in any climate change debate. I say misguided because it assumes that the petroleum companies want business as usual; that we are reluctant to change; and that we comprise a large group of climate change deniers; that we have no personal

  • Florida's Corals Are Dying Off, But It's Not All Due To Climate Change, Study Says
    NPR.org

    Florida's Corals Are Dying Off, But It's Not All Due To Climate Change, Study Says

    Brian Lapointe, a research professor at Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, has spent his career studying corals at the Looe Key Reef, in a National Marine Sanctuary in the Florida Keys. Over that time, he's witnessed an alarming trend. In the past 20 year, half of Florida corals have died off. "Watching the decline of coral at Looe Key has been heartbreaking," Lapointe says. "When I moved here in the early 1980's, I had no idea that we would be losing these corals." Lapointe is lead author on a new paper in the journal Marine Biology. It analyzes 30 years of data he's collected. When he started his research, in 1984, coral covered 33% of the Looe Key Sanctuary

  • The Daily Star

    Some reef islands resilient to climate change: study

    The Pacific's low-lying reef islands are likely to change shape in response to climate change, rather than simply sinking beneath rising seas and becoming uninhabitable as previously assumed, new research has found. Atoll nations such as Tuvalu, Tokelau and Kiribati lie only a few metres above sea level and are considered the world's most vulnerable to global warming, with fears their populations will become climate refugees as waters rise. The researchers said evidence that such islands slowly change like shifting sands had profound implications for climate change planning in affected nations. Co-author Murray Ford of Auckland University said low-lying reef islands appeared more resilient than previously thought.

  • PR Newswire

    United Nations Foundation Announces Press Fellowship to the UN General Assembly with a Special Focus on Climate Change

    WASHINGTON, July 16, 2019 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ -- The United Nations Foundation today announced its 10th annual press fellowship to the opening of the 74th session of the UN General Assembly – the annual gathering of heads of state at the UN headquarters in New York. The fellowship will take place from September 21 to September 25, 2019. Participating journalists will have access to exclusive briefings on the issues that impact lives around the world, including a special focus on climate change.

  • Judge rejects young Quebecers' novel lawsuit seeking federal climate change action
    BayToday.ca

    Judge rejects young Quebecers' novel lawsuit seeking federal climate change action

    MONTREAL — A Quebec environmental group says it will appeal a decision last week rejecting its attempt to launch a class action lawsuit against the federal government for what it says is a failure to combat climate change. Superior Court Justice Gary Morrison delivered his ruling Thursday, emphasizing that the cause of environmental protection was of undoubted importance but raising doubts about the nature of the class seeking damages. The action brought by the group ENvironnement JEUnesse would be on behalf of Quebecers aged 35 and under, whom lawyers argue are being deprived of a right to a healthy environment and will suffer the effects of global warming more than older generations. It was

  • Climate crisis: US ‘on path to extreme heat’ in coming decades if emissions aren’t reduced, study says
    The Independent

    Climate crisis: US ‘on path to extreme heat’ in coming decades if emissions aren’t reduced, study says

    Widespread "increases in extreme heat” due to climate change could bring unprecedented risks to the US in coming decades, a new study has warned. By 2050, hundreds of American cities could experience an entire month each year with US "heat index" temperatures above 100F (38C) if nothing is done to tackle emissions and the resultant climate crisis, scientists said. In the US, the National Weather Service heat index scale starts topping out above temperatures of 127F (52C), depending on the combination of temperature and humidity.Few places would be unaffected by extreme heat conditions by 2050 and only a few mountainous regions would remain extreme heat refuges by the century’s end, the team from the Union of Concerned Scientists said.They said this failure to reduce emissions could set the country on a path to soaring temperatures including conditions so far in excess of current climate trends they will surpass the heat index.This is a measure of how hot it feels when humidity is factored in with the air temperature, providing a number on a coloured scale, starting with 80F (26C) which is yellow – caution, and rising through dark yellow beginning at 91F (33C) – extreme caution, orange at 103F (39.5C) – danger, and up to red beginning at 126F (52C) – extreme danger.The average number of days per year nationwide with a heat index above 105 degrees Fahrenheit would more than quadruple to 24 by mid-century and increase eight-fold to 40 by late century, the analysis, published in the journal Environmental Research Communications, revealed.Such “off-the-charts” conditions could pose unprecedented health risks, the Union of Concerned Scientists said.“Our analysis shows a hotter future that’s hard to imagine today,” the study's co-author Kristina Dahl, a climate scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists, told the USA Today newspaper. “Nearly everywhere, people will experience more days of dangerous heat in the next few decades.” The work is the first study to examine the impacts of climate change on the heat index – instead of just temperature – when calculating the impacts of warming, Dr Dahl said.“We have little to no experience with ‘off-the-charts’ heat in the US,” said Erika Spanger-Siegfried, co-author of the report and lead climate analyst at the Union of Concerned Scientists.“These conditions occur at or above a heat index of 127 degrees, depending on temperature and humidity. Exposure to conditions in that range makes it difficult for human bodies to cool themselves and could be deadly,” she added.

  • La La Anthony spotted with Carmelo after cheating rumors | Boomloaded
    boomloaded.com

    La La Anthony spotted with Carmelo after cheating rumors | Boomloaded

    Nearly a month after Carmelo Anthony was spotted yachting with a mystery woman—sparking rumors he was cheating on wife La La— the couple was spotted out together in Beverly Hills on Friday.The pair was photographed getting into a car after dining tog

  • Journal criticised for study claiming sun is causing global warming
    New Scientist

    Journal criticised for study claiming sun is causing global warming

    A high profile scientific journal is investigating how it came to publish a study suggesting that global warming is down to natural solar cycles. The paper was criticised by scientists for containing “very basic errors” about how Earth moves around the sun. The study was published online on 24 June by Scientific Reports, an open access journal run by Nature Research, which also lists the prestigious Nature journal among its titles. A spokesperson told New Scientist that it is aware of concerns raised over the paper, which was authored by five academics based at Northumbria University, the University of Bradford and the University of Hull, all in the UK, plus the Nasir al-Din al-Tusi Shamakhi

  • Lake discovered 11,000ft high in the Alps, in 'truly alarming' sign of climate change
    The Independent

    Lake discovered 11,000ft high in the Alps, in 'truly alarming' sign of climate change

    A mountaineer has captured the formation of an “alarming” lake high in the French Alps after glacial snow melted in the intense heatwave that gripped central Europe in late June.Bryan Mestre was shocked to discover the large pool of water at an altitude of 11,100ft (3,400m) in the Mount Blanc mountain range – claiming the unusual sight was a worrying sign.Scientists have warned that heatwaves in Europe are becoming increasingly frequent, with the intense temperatures linked to climate change.“Time to sound the alarm,” said Mr Mestre. “Only 10 days of extreme heat were enough to collapse, melt and form a lake at the base of the Dent du Géant and the Aiguilles Marbrées.”He added: “This is truly alarming … glaciers all over the world are melting at an exponential speed.”Sharing the image on Instagram, the French rock climber said he took the photo on 28 June – only 10 days after fellow mountaineer Paul Todhunter captured the same area covered in snow.“Needless to say, the lake was a real surprise,” Mr Mestre told the IFLScience website.> View this post on Instagram> > Time to sound the alarm... The problem here? These two pictures were taken only 10 days apart... It was taken earlier on June 28th, the second one was shared by Paul Todhunter. Only 10 days of extreme heat were enough to collapse, melt and form a lake at the base of the Dent du Géant and the Aiguilles Marbrées That I know, this is the first time anything like that as ever happened. Southern Europe and the Alps have been struck by a massive heatwave with temperature ranging from 40 to 50 degrees, the below 0 freezing altitude was as high as 4,700m (15,400ft) and during the day temperatures as high as 10 degrees Celsius (50 F) were felt on top of Mont Blanc 4,810m (15,780ft)... This is truly alarming glaciers all over the world are melting at an exponential speed... My interview with @mblivetv can be found here! https://montblanclive.com/radiomontblanc/article/massif-du-mont-blanc-un-petit-lac-se-forme-a-plus-de-3000-m-daltitude-48453 climbing climber climb frenchalps savoie savoiemontblanc hautesavoie outdoors globalwarming mountaineering mountains mountain montagne montaña montagna montanhismo mountaineer alpinist alpinism alpinisme alpinismo alpi alps environment savetheplanet climatechange montblanc @patagonia @beal.official @millet_mountain @blueiceclimbing> > A post shared by Bryan Mestre (@bryanthealpinist) on Jun 30, 2019 at 3:10am PDT“It’s located in the 3,400 to 3,500-meter area. You’re supposed to find ice and snow at this altitude, not liquid water. Most of the time when we stay for a day at this altitude, the water in our water bottles starts freezing.”“I have been up there a fair amount of times, in June, July and even August, and I have never seen liquid water up there,” he added.Glaciologist Ludovic Ravanel previously noticed a lake appearing high in the French Alps in 2015 and linked its formation to global warming.According to the EU’s Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), last month was the hottest June ever recorded on Earth.Data released by the satellite agency showed Europe’s average ​temperatures were more than 2C above normal, and temperatures were between 6C and 10C above normal over most of France, Germany and northern Spain during the final days of the month.

  • Science Daily

    Tracking down climate change with radar eyes

    "The Arctic is a hotspot of climate change," explains Prof. Florian Seitz of the German Geodetic Research Institute at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). "Due to rising temperatures, the glaciers of Greenland are receding. At the same time sea ice is melting. Every year, billions of liters of meltwater are released into the ocean." The enormous volumes of fresh water released in the Arctic not only raise the sea level, they also have the potential to change the system of global ocean currents -- and thus, our climate. But how fast do sea levels rise? And precisely what effect does this have? To answer these questions, climatologists and oceanographers require specific measurements over

  • Forest elephants are our allies in the fight against climate change, finds research
    The Conversation

    Forest elephants are our allies in the fight against climate change, finds research

    A new study shows these elephants boost the carbon stored in their forests by 7%.

  • California’s Wildfires Are 500 Percent Larger Due to Climate Change
    The Atlantic

    California’s Wildfires Are 500 Percent Larger Due to Climate Change

    “Each degree of warming causes way more fire than the previous degree of warming did. And that’s a really big deal.”