Entertainment

Entertainment is a form of activity that holds the attention and interest of an audience, or gives pleasure and delight. It can be an idea or a task, but is more likely to be one of the activities or events that have developed over thousands of years specifically for the purpose of keeping an audience's attention. Although people's attention is held by different things, because individuals have different preferences in entertainment, most forms are recognisable and familiar.
Keep up with everything going on with TV, movies, music and more.
  • Romanian Crime-Thriller ‘The Whistlers’ Bought for North America
    Variety

    Romanian Crime-Thriller ‘The Whistlers’ Bought for North America

    Magnolia Pictures has bought North American rights to the Romanian crime thriller "The Whistlers" following its premiere in competition at the Cannes Film Festival. Written and directed by Corneliu Porumboiu, the film stars Vlad Ivanov, Catrinel Marlon, Rodica Lazar, Antonio Buil, Agustí Villaronga, Sabin Tambrea, Julieta Szonyi and George Pisterneanu. Magnolia is eyeing a theatrical […]

  • Facebook Says It Won’t Remove Unflattering Nancy Pelosi Videos From Its Platform
    Deadline

    Facebook Says It Won’t Remove Unflattering Nancy Pelosi Videos From Its Platform

    A video that appears to show House majority leader Nancy Pelosi slurring her words will not be removed from Facebook. The video in question shows Pelosi speaking in a slurring style that some claim shows her as drunk or not well. Supporters claim it has been altered to create the appearance that Pelosi  isn't coherent. […]

  • Taika Waititi's Akira  sets 2021 release date
    Entertainment Weekly

    Taika Waititi's Akira  sets 2021 release date

    Taika Waititi's Akira sets 2021 release date

  • SVU's Upcoming, History-Making Season 21 Should Be Its Last
    TVLine.com

    SVU's Upcoming, History-Making Season 21 Should Be Its Last

    In the fall, Law & Order: SVU will kick off its 21st season, making it the longest-running primetime live-action series in television history. That’s quite the accomplishment. It’s also a really good stopping point for a procedural long past its prime. Yep, I’m saying it’s time for SVU to hang it up. Chung chung! “Objection!,” […]

  • Will Smith Hilariously Calls Out Son For Being Super Late To ‘Aladdin’ Premiere
    HuffPost

    Will Smith Hilariously Calls Out Son For Being Super Late To ‘Aladdin’ Premiere

    Jaden Smith was so late that the Smiths ended up taking a family photo in an alley behind the movie theater.

  • Kardashian Family Event Planner Mindy Weiss Sued by Former Employee for Racial Discrimination
    TheBlast

    Kardashian Family Event Planner Mindy Weiss Sued by Former Employee for Racial Discrimination

    Celebrity event planner Mindy Weiss is being sued by a former African American employee who claims her boss was racist and even once invited her to an event at the Kardashians home because her “people” would be there. According to court documents obtained by The Blast, Breanna Tyler has sued Mindy Weiss Party Consultants and […] The post Kardashian Family Event Planner Mindy Weiss Sued by Former Employee for Racial Discrimination appeared first on The Blast.

  • Top Newspaper Editors Condemn Assange Indictments, Say Journalists Could Be Stifled if He’s Convicted
    The Wrap

    Top Newspaper Editors Condemn Assange Indictments, Say Journalists Could Be Stifled if He’s Convicted

    The U.S. Justice Department’s decision to indict WikiLeaks boss Julian Assange under the Espionage Act has led to forceful condemnations from top newspaper editors and has legal scholars weighing the repercussions on journalists.Assange’s prosecution is quickly turning into a landmark case, UCLA legal scholar Eugene Volokh told TheWrap. At the heart of the matter is whether it’s against the law for people to publish material they know was obtained illegally. Typically, the Espionage Act, which dates back to the first World War, has been used to target officials who leak information — rather than reporters and activists. Assange, who is facing 17 counts under the Act, is being prosecuted for publishing hundreds of thousands of State Department files from his source, former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning.“The most interesting charges are near the end of the indictment, where Assange is being prosecuted for basically simply publishing this material, knowing Manning had illegally released it to him,” Volokh said. “That’s the matter that is likely to cast the longest shadow if this prosecution is allowed to go forward and any objections to it are rejected on appeal.”Volokh said journalists who have published illegally obtained material in the past have been protected. In 2001, Bartnicki v. Vopper established that journalists could publish illegally obtained material, as long as they didn’t participated in the illegal activity.Conor Friedersdorf, writing in The Atlantic on Friday, argued that an Assange conviction would go against that ruling. While Manning “pledged to protect state secrets,” Assange was “under no obligation to the U.S. government, and appears to be in legal jeopardy for some actions that are virtually indistinguishable from journalism,” Friedersdorf wrote.Prosecuting Assange, according to Washington Post executive editor Marty Baron, could severely hamper journalists moving forward.“Dating as far back as the Pentagon Papers case and beyond, journalists have been receiving and reporting on information that the government deemed classified. Wrongdoing and abuse of power were exposed,” Baron said in a statement. “With the new indictment of Julian Assange, the government is advancing a legal argument that places such important work in jeopardy and undermines the very purpose of the First Amendment.”Baron added: “The administration has gone from denigrating journalists as ‘enemies of the people’ to now criminalizing common practices in journalism that have long served the public interest. Meantime, government officials continue to engage in a decades-long practice of overclassifying information, often for reasons that have nothing to do with national security and a lot to do with shielding themselves from the constitutionally protected scrutiny of the press.”That sentiment was echoed by Baron’s counterpart at the New York Times, Dean Baquet.“A fundamental principle of the First Amendment is that journalists have the right to publish truthful information, even when a source may have broken the law to provide that information,” Baquet said.“In charging Julian Assange for receiving and disclosing classified information in violation of the Espionage Act, the government threatens to undermine that basic tenet of press freedom. Obtaining and publishing information that the government would prefer to keep secret is vital to journalism and democracy. The new indictment is a deeply troubling step toward giving the government greater control over what Americans are allowed to know.”One thing that’s important to keep in mind: If Assange is found to have participated in hacking or otherwise gathering the stolen information, his First Amendment protection goes out the window.“Although there is a right to publish illegally obtained information, that does not immunize the person who obtained it illegally in the first place,” University of Virginia legal scholar Fred Schauer told TheWrap. “If Assange or others are charged with illegally getting the information in the first place, the First Amendment, under current understanding, is not implicated.”On the other hand, if Assange is convicted for merely publishing the material and the conviction is upheld by an appeals court, the case would set a new precedent that could stifle journalists, Volokh said.“The question is whether a reporter who gets the leak has to say, ‘Wait a minute, maybe I’m committing the crime just by publishing this information, even if I wasn’t complicit in the original leak,” Volokh said. “Here the answer would be very direct: the Assange case set a precedent. You could go to prison for publishing this.”What makes Assange’s case so high-stakes is that it could also break in the opposite direction, reaffirming Vopper and safeguarding a journalistic right.“I think journalists should be worried about this now,” Volokh said. But he added: “If, of course, the court holds that though these charges are precluded by the First Amendment, then journalists might say, ‘Wow, we were better off now after this prosecution because we had this important First Amendment principle established.'”Top Newspaper Editors Condemn Assange Indictments, Say Journalists Could Be Stifled if He’s ConvictedRead original story Top Newspaper Editors Condemn Assange Indictments, Say Journalists Could Be Stifled if He’s Convicted At TheWrap

  • ‘Aladdin’: Naomi Scott on Why Her Princess Jasmine Needed Nasim Pedrad’s New Character
    Variety

    ‘Aladdin’: Naomi Scott on Why Her Princess Jasmine Needed Nasim Pedrad’s New Character

    Call Naomi Scott the queen of the reboot – or at least, the princess. The 26-year-old actress is taking on the role of Princess Jasmine in Disney’s live-action remake of “Aladdin,” but it’s not her first time jumping into a role that’s already been well-established. Audiences may recognize Scott from 2017’s “Power Rangers” update, where […]

  • ‘What/If’ Review: Renée Zellweger’s Netflix Soap Is Exquisite, Binge-Worthy Trash
    Indiewire

    ‘What/If’ Review: Renée Zellweger’s Netflix Soap Is Exquisite, Binge-Worthy Trash

    Mike Kelley's anthology thriller is an addictive, tongue-in-cheek homage to '90s neo-noir, packed with preposterous melodrama and juicy twists.

  • Aretha Franklin’s Handwritten Will Shows Concern Over Her Son With Disabilities’ Future
    The Mighty

    Aretha Franklin’s Handwritten Will Shows Concern Over Her Son With Disabilities’ Future

    American singer, Aretha Franklin, left handwritten notes with instructions regarding her oldest son, Clarence, who has disabilities that were never publicly disclosed.

  • Princess Charlotte Will Attend School With Prince George, and We Bet She's Going to Run the Place
    PopSugar

    Princess Charlotte Will Attend School With Prince George, and We Bet She's Going to Run the Place

    Princess Charlotte, 4, and her big brother, Prince George, 5, are going to be schoolmates! On May 24, Kensington Palace revealed the two royals will share school grounds this Fall.

  • Moby Accuses Natalie Portman of Lying as the Two Spar Over Dating Claims
    Variety

    Moby Accuses Natalie Portman of Lying as the Two Spar Over Dating Claims

    In what's become a he said/she said spat in multiple mediums, Moby, the elder statesman of electronic music, is now accusing actress Natalie Portman of lying and pleading to those on social media for his safety as "physical threats from complete strangers" emerge. To recap: this month, Moby released a new book, "Then It All […]

  • Kanye West Shares Touching Story About Late Mother Donda: 'She's Here, Guiding Us'
    Entertainment Tonight

    Kanye West Shares Touching Story About Late Mother Donda: 'She's Here, Guiding Us'

    The rapper gets candid during a sneak peek of his interview with David Letterman on 'My Next Guest Needs No Introduction.'

  • Cannes prize for Brazilian movie sends message of hope, director says
    Reuters

    Cannes prize for Brazilian movie sends message of hope, director says

    "The Invisible Life of Euridice Gusmao", a tale of two sisters and their struggles in a male-dominated society  in 1950s-era Brazil, won the Un Certain Regard prize at Cannes, which aims to shine a light on more unusual movies. Brazil's far-right president Jair Bolsonaro has talked of waging war on "cultural Marxism" and has reduced the remit of the country's culture ministry, leaving many filmmakers fearing it will become more difficult to get their movies made. "I think it sends a message of hope," Ainouz told Reuters after the ceremony in the south of France.