FBI

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the domestic intelligence and security service of the United States, and its principal federal law enforcement agency. Operating under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Justice, the FBI is also a member of the U.S. Intelligence Community and reports to both the Attorney General and the Director of National Intelligence. A leading U.S.
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  • 'Coup attempt' inflammatory
    The Citizens' Voice

    'Coup attempt' inflammatory

    After former FBI Director Andrew McCabe said recently that he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein had discussed the prospect of President Donald Trump's removal from office under the 25th Amendment, Trump heartily endorsed a Fox News commentator's nonsensical assertion that this was “a coup attempt....” As noted by Philip Bump of The Washington Post, the 25th Amendment is part of the U.S. Constitution, thus an entirely constitutional device. And the mechanism specified by the amendment to remove an unfit person from office would not involve McCabe, Rosenstein or their departments. Beyond that, the amendment itself includes an array of checks and balances to preclude its use in a coup.

  • The Washingtion Times

    Mississippi police department, FBI investigate arrest

    The Jackson Police Department and the FBI are investigating after an encounter with police officers on Valentine's Day left a man on life support for days before he died. City of Jackson spokeswoman Candice Cole says officers involved with the arrest of 31-year-old Mario Clark have been placed on administrative leave, per department policy. News outlets report Hinds County Coroner Sharon Grisham-Stewart says Clark's autopsy was completed Thursday and his death has been ruled a homicide.

  • Report: Grand jury considers case against ex-Interior boss
    The Charlotte Observer

    Report: Grand jury considers case against ex-Interior boss

    The Washington Post reports that a grand jury is considering evidence concerning whether former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke lied to federal investigators. The Associated Press reported in November that the Interior Department's inspector general had referred an investigation of Zinke to the Justice Department. The Post reported Friday that the case the grand jury is considering involves Zinke's decision to block two Indian tribes from opening a casino in Connecticut, and whether Zinke lied to the inspector general's investigators. The newspaper cites two people who had been briefed on the matter but spoke anonymously because grand jury proceedings are not public. Zinke had come under scrutiny

  • FBI Completes Investigation Of Indianapolis Police Shooting
    WFYI Public Media

    FBI Completes Investigation Of Indianapolis Police Shooting

    The FBI has completed a civil rights investigation into the fatal police shooting of an unarmed black man following a 2017 chase and turned its findings over to the U.S. attorney.url2019-02-22T00:00:00-05:00 INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The FBI has completed a civil rights investigation into the fatal police shooting of an unarmed black man following a 2017 chase and turned its findings over to the U.S. attorney. Two police officers shot Aaron Bailey, 45, four times after he crashed his car into a tree following a brief pursuit that began when he sped away from a traffic stop. Indianapolis' police chief, Bryan Roach, said he requested the outside investigation by the FBI to address community concerns

  • Taylor cop suspended, mayor's aide quits as FBI corruption probe widens
    Detroit News

    Taylor cop suspended, mayor's aide quits as FBI corruption probe widens

    Taylor — Mayor Rick Sollars' chief of staff is leaving his post and a police officer has been suspended following a raid on the mayor's office this week by FBI agents investigating public corruption. FBI agents also are investigating whether a contractor whose home and office was raided Tuesday helped renovate the mayor's lakefront chalet in Lenawee County, sources told The News. New threads of the investigation surfaced Friday, three days after FBI agents raided Taylor City Hall, the mayor's home and chalet, and the house and office of city contractor Shady Awad. Sollars' chief of staff, Robert Dickerson, submitted his resignation letter Jan. 25, almost four weeks before the investigation burst into public view.

  • Feds testify ex-Texas State student could have been next mass shooter or bomber but San Antonio judge orders him sent home
    Plainview Daily Herald

    Feds testify ex-Texas State student could have been next mass shooter or bomber but San Antonio judge orders him sent home

    Caption Close A former Texas State University student now behind bars could be home as early as next week after a federal judge in San Antonio ordered him released to his parents over the vigorous objections of FBI agents who testified he could be the country's next mass shooter or bomber. Benjamin Bogard of New Braunfels created “disturbing” videos in which he embraced white supremacy, said he wanted to kill minorities and discussed obtaining a chemical substance to make a bomb, according to testimony before U.S. Magistrate Judge Henry Bemporad on Thursday. FBI agents contend Bogard could have engaged in mass violence had they not stepped in and arrested him earlier this month on a child pornography

  • Big League Politics

    How Robert Mueller's FBI Allowed Minnesota to Become a Somali Terror Hub

    As Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) agitates against the Jews as a Congresswoman, the Minneapolis Somali community has emerged as the foremost terrorist hot spot of the United States. This influx of Somali migrants is threatening the national security of the United States and is being enabled by far-left Democratic legislators such as Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) who, unsurprisingly, are happy to kowtow to these hostile invaders for votes and campaign cash. It is a bipartisan issue, as the Somalian migrant influx picked up during the Bush years. It was the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) under the stewardship of Director Robert Mueller that dropped the ball following the Sept. 11 attacks when the Bureau should have been at its most vigilant.

  • Maserati towed from scene of FBI raid in upscale neighborhood
    WSB Radio

    Maserati towed from scene of FBI raid in upscale neighborhood

    Federal agents searched a house in an upscale Sandy Springs neighborhood Friday morning.  Channel 2's Audrey Washington was the only reporter on Crestwicke Pointe in Sandy Springs, where she said she saw agents tow away a Maserati. We're working to learn background information about the case that led to the raid, for updates on Channel 2 Action News starting at 4 p.m.  TRENDING STORIES: Mother of 5's death ruled accidental; investigation closed VIDEO: Man punches attorney after sentencing for domestic violence Great-grandma fires pistol at man trying to break into her home There were dozens of FBI agents there early Friday. The FBI confirmed to Washington that they are conducting a court-authorized

  • 'Whiskey Cavalier' presents softer side of FBI
    Lansing State Journal

    'Whiskey Cavalier' presents softer side of FBI

    We've had plenty of superspies who are strong and silent, cold and cunning and kind of stiff. It may be time for the opposite. In “Whiskey Cavalier,” Will Chase (Scott Foley) is an FBI guy who feels everyone's emotions, especially his own. We meet him after a devastating break-up. That's “a great way to introduce a different side to (an) action man,” Foley said. He collides with his opposite – CIA agent Frankie Trowbridge. “She is built on emotional independence,” said Lauren Cohan, who plays her. Viewers expect a love-hate relationship, but the opener is mostly hate-hate. The gun keeps changing hands and various people are confined to the car trunk. The idea, screenwriter David Hemingson said,

  • FBI Scientist's Statements Linked Defendants to Crimes, Even When His Lab Results Didn't
    ProPublica

    FBI Scientist's Statements Linked Defendants to Crimes, Even When His Lab Results Didn't

    A man stepped into a rural South Carolina bank a few days before Christmas in 2001, aimed a gun at tellers and stole $7,800 from the drawers. Witnesses couldn't identify the robber. The surveillance video was too grainy to help investigators. More than three years later, FBI agents narrowed the investigation to a suspect. They believed John Henry Stroman robbed the bank. But during questioning, Stroman told them the security footage instead showed his brother, Roger. How could investigators prove one brother was the robber and not the other? Agents shipped the video and pictures of both Stromans to the FBI Laboratory in July 2005. The package went to Richard Vorder Bruegge, one of the bureau's

  • FBI Solicits Information From Bitconnect Investors With Voluntary Questionnaire
    Cointelegraph

    FBI Solicits Information From Bitconnect Investors With Voluntary Questionnaire

    The United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is seeking to contact investors in alleged ponzi scheme Bitconnect (BCC) that collapsed in January last year, a news statement confirmed on Feb. 20. As part of ongoing investigations into the activities of the well-known but shadowy scheme, the Cleveland branch of the U.S. law enforcement agency appealed to ex-investors to give information about their interaction with Bitconnect.

  • FBI civil rights investigation of Bailey shooting is done. What happens next is unclear.
    Indianapolis Star

    FBI civil rights investigation of Bailey shooting is done. What happens next is unclear.

    The FBI has completed its civil rights investigation into the fatal police shooting of an unarmed black motorist who fled a traffic stop in 2017 and was shot in the back. Now the case is in the hands of U.S. Attorney Josh Minkler.  Aaron Bailey, 45, was shot and killed June 29, 2017, by two Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department officers following a late-night traffic stop and brief vehicle pursuit that ended in Bailey crashing his vehicle. The officers, Michal P. Dinnsen and Carlton J. Howard, fired 11 shots into the side and back of the vehicle. They said they saw Bailey reaching toward the center console, where they feared a gun may have been stored.  Four of the rounds struck Bailey

  • FBI: Butler County men ran interstate stolen baby formula scheme
    Cincinnati.com

    FBI: Butler County men ran interstate stolen baby formula scheme

    Three Butler County men are accused of paying thieves, including people strugging with addiction, to steal baby formula then shipping the goods across the country, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office. Khalil Yacub, Khalil Jaghama and Jasser Saleh were arrested Thursday morning. Yacub and Saleh live in Liberty Township and Jaghama lives in West Chester. Yacub's family owns the Pit Stop convenience store on W. Galbraith Road in Colerain Township, prosecutors said, which served a depot those wanting to sell stolen formula. FBI investigators reported all three men worked here. According to court documents, informants told police they would get $5 for a specific-sized can of Enfamil powder formula,

  • Federal Investigators Thwart Potentially Massive Terrorist Attack
    NPR.org

    Federal Investigators Thwart Potentially Massive Terrorist Attack

    ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Federal investigators have thwarted what they say could've been a massive terrorist attack. They discovered a stockpile of weapons in a Maryland home. And now Coast Guard Lieutenant Christopher Hasson is in custody. He's accused of planning to, quote, "murder innocent civilians on a scale rarely seen in this country," according to court documents. Reporter Lynh Bui is covering the story for The Washington Post and joins us now. Welcome. LYNH BUI: Thank you so much. SHAPIRO: Beyond the weapons cache, what did investigators uncover about this man and his intentions? BUI: Investigators detailed a lot of chilling things in their court documents filed. They said that he followed

  • APNewsBreak: Feds share terrorist watchlist with 1,400 private groups
    The Hanford Sentinel

    APNewsBreak: Feds share terrorist watchlist with 1,400 private groups

    The federal government has acknowledged that it shares its terrorist watchlist with more than 1,400 private entities, including hospitals and universities, prompting concerns from civil libertarians that those mistakenly placed on the list could face a wide variety of hassles in their daily lives. The government's admission that it shares the list so broadly comes after years of insistence that the list is generally not shared with the private sector. Gadeir Abbas, a lawyer with the Council on American-Islamic Relations, which has filed a constitutional challenge to the government's use of the watchlist, called the government's admission shocking. "We've always suspected there was private-sector dissemination of the terror watchlist, but we had no idea the breadth of the dissemination would be so large," Abbas said.