Gun control debate

Gun politics is an area of American politics defined by two primary opposing ideologies about civilian gun ownership. People who advocate for gun control support increasing regulations related to gun ownership; people who advocate for gun rights support decreasing regulations related to gun ownership. These groups often disagree on the interpretation of laws and court cases related to firearms as well as about the effects of firearms regulation on crime and public safety.
Latest news and discussion about gun control issues in America.
  • Firearm deaths of US school-age children at 'epidemic' levels, study says
    USA TODAY

    Firearm deaths of US school-age children at 'epidemic' levels, study says

    Capping two days of action on gun control, the House has passed legislation to allow a review period of up to 10 days for background checks on firearms purchases, thereby closing what's called the 'Charleston loophole.' (Feb. 28) Calling it an "epidemic," scientists in a new study Thursday announced an alarming increase in the number of firearm deaths of school-age children in the United States:  38,942 in those 5 to 18 years old from 1999 to 2017. "It is sobering that in 2017, there were 144 police officers who died in the line of duty and about 1,000 active-duty military throughout the world who died, whereas 2,462 school-age children were killed by firearms," said Charles H. Hennekens, M.D.,

  • New Zealand's knee-jerk gun ban is EXACTLY why we have the Second Amendment
    Conservative Review

    New Zealand's knee-jerk gun ban is EXACTLY why we have the Second Amendment

    Thank goodness we have the Second Amendment. I say that a lot, but I'm especially grateful after seeing the latest news out of New Zealand. Less than a week after the mosque shootings in Christchurch, New Zealand has moved to ban and confiscate semi-automatic long guns. The bill bans so-called “military style semi-automatic firearms,” which according to the bill are any rifle or shotgun that accepts a detachable magazine that holds more than five rounds. But .22 and smaller-caliber arms are exempt, so everybody's varmint guns are safe. And, according to reports, the legal owners of now-illegal hardware will be entitled to “fair and reasonable” compensation through a buyback program that's expected

  • Founder of Black Guns Matter Speaks Out: 'Gun Control Is About People Control'
    The Daily Signal

    Founder of Black Guns Matter Speaks Out: 'Gun Control Is About People Control'

    Maj Toure, founder of Black Guns Matter, comes from inner-city Philadelphia, where he teaches black youth about their Second Amendment rights. Read the interview posted below, or listen to the podcast. We also cover these stories: President Donald Trump is in favor of the public having access to special counsel Robert Mueller's final report. Sen. Chuck Schumer has announced that he will soon introduce a measure to re-name a Senate office building after the late Sen. John McCain. A new poll shows what Americans really think of the political humor on “Saturday Night Live.” The Daily Signal podcast is available on Ricochet, iTunes, SoundCloud, Google Play, or Stitcher. All of our podcasts can be

  • Colorado sheriffs who refuse to enforce anti-gun 'red flag' law should 'resign,' state AG says
    Fox News

    Colorado sheriffs who refuse to enforce anti-gun 'red flag' law should 'resign,' state AG says

    Colorado's attorney general testified said week that country sheriffs vowing not to enforce the state's proposed anti-gun "red flag" bill should "resign" -- a challenge that threatened to ramp up tensions between state officials and local leaders who were already creating droves of so-called Second Amendment "sanctuary counties" to resist the legislation. Democrat Phil Weiser made the remarks, which were first reported by The Colorado Sun, while testifying before a state committee on Friday. Weiser has said that the red flag legislation, which would permit a court to the seizure of weapons from people determined to be a threat to others or themselves, would save lives, particularly in domestic violence situations. The proposed state law, House Bill 1177, is expected to secure passage in the Colorado legislature and be approved by the state's Democrat governor, Jared Polis.

  • Las Vegas shooting survivor speaks on gun control bills
    seattlepi.com

    Las Vegas shooting survivor speaks on gun control bills

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — A survivor of the 2017 mass shooting at a Las Vegas concert has spoken in support of a series of gun bills facing Rhode Island lawmakers. The Providence Journal reports that Erica Keuter described the chaos of the shooting during an hours-long hearing at the State House on Tuesday. She says her experience shows that gun violence can happen "anywhere, anytime, to anyone." The bills would ban the sale and possession of assault weapons and high-capacity magazines and impose a penalty for the unsafe storage of firearms. Democratic state Rep. Justine Caldwell, who introduced the measures, says both the state and the nation are "suffering a crisis of gun violence." Fellow Democratic

  • Impallaria: Bills represent no-sense gun control
    Baltimore Sun

    Impallaria: Bills represent no-sense gun control

    One of a series of weekly commentaries from Harford County state legislators regarding the 2019 Maryland General Assembly session. Over the past several years, and even up to this very day, we have found that gun violence is constantly in the news. With so many liberal media outlets and networks, we have to sift through these agendas and somehow find the truth. The truth starts with knowledge, first and foremost. I have seen too many times how every story regarding guns quickly becomes a push for bans or restrictions. Headlines calling for more gun control and restrictions are pushed out to every outlet with very little understanding of what is really going on. Guns do not take lives, the person

  • New Zealand’s swift change to gun laws highlights 25 years of US inaction
    The Guardian

    New Zealand’s swift change to gun laws highlights 25 years of US inaction

    Sweeping new ban that came just six days after mass shooting in Christchurch is a stark contrast to the political stalemate in the US Vigil at Forsyth Barr Stadium on Thursday in Dunedin, New Zealand for 50 people killed when a gunman opened fire at the Al Noor and Linwood mosques in Christchurch on 15 March. Photograph: Dianne Manson/Getty Images New Zealand’s sweeping new ban on a range of semi-automatic rifles and large ammunition magazines, which came just six days after a mass shooting in Christchurch, has been hailed as the “fastest response ever by a government after a tragedy”. In the US, where conservative politicians have blocked even moderate gun control for 25 years, New Zealand’s swift action was greeted as a powerful inspiration – and a reminder of how far behind the country is. “Sandy Hook happened six years ago and we can’t even get the Senate to hold a vote on universal background checks,” Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the New York congresswoman, wrote on Twitter, referring to the 2012 shooting at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, that left 20 children and six educators dead. Sandy Hook happened 6 years ago and we can’t even get the Senate to hold a vote on universal background checks w/ #HR8.Christchurch happened, and within days New Zealand acted to get weapons of war out of the consumer market.This is what leadership looks like ⬇️ https://t.co/TcdR63anBt— Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC) March 21, 2019 “This is what leadership looks like,” David Hogg, one of the students from Parkland, Florida, who founded the March for Our Lives movement for gun control after a shooting at their school last February, tweeted, sharing a video of the announcement by New Zealand’s prime minister, Jacinda Ardern. Some Democratic presidential candidates have already pledged to support a ban on assault weapons – though one that would probably be much more limited that New Zealand’s. “We must follow New Zealand’s lead, take on the NRA and ban the sale and distribution of assault weapons in the United States,” tweeted the Vermont senator Bernie Sanders, a 2020 Democratic presidential candidate who has been attacked for his mixed record on gun control in the past. “We had an assault weapons ban once, and we should have it again,” Senator Kamala Harris of California, tweeted a few days after the Christchurch attacks. “These weapons of war do not belong on our streets, in our schools, or at our houses of worship. This is a fight I will take on as president.” Pro-gun activists in the United States said that New Zealand’s aggressive action to ban ownership of previously legal guns, and enact a mandatory buyback, would never be viable in the United States. “The US isn’t New Zealand,” Dana Loesch, a prominent gun rights activist and National Rifle Association spokeswoman, tweeted. “They do not have an inalienable right to bear arms and to self-defense, we do.” In another tweet, she wrote: “To ‘follow these examples’ the US would need to repeal the Second Amendment, ban all semi-auto, force gun stores to show all purchases to gov’t, and spend $200 million taxpayer dollars to confiscate firearms.” I sure see a lot of people who like to say "nobody is coming for your guns" celebrating this confiscation effort. https://t.co/e3quZ8v7gi— Stephen Gutowski (@StephenGutowski) March 21, 2019 Rebecca Peters, who helped lead the successful campaign to reform Australia’s gun laws in the 1990s, said she believed New Zealand’s government action was the “fastest response ever” by government officials after a mass shooting. It took the British government seven months after the massacre of 16 children in Dunblane, Scotland, in March 1996, to announce a partial ban on handguns, which parents of the children had demanded as part of the Snowdrop Campaign. It took the Australian government 10 days after the Port Arthur massacre in April 1996 to announce the National Firearms Agreement. New Zealand announced the new ban on military-style weapons – one with broad support from the prime minister and the opposition – after only six days. “It’s a small parliament. It’s a small country. And obviously, they have very high support for it,” Peters said. In a press conference on Thursday, Ardern promised increased penalties for continued ownership of the banned weapons. New Zealand’s minister of police said police were “gearing up” to enable military-style weapons to be taken out of circulation. Police will be supported by the New Zealand defense force, he said, and would consult gun licensing records. Ardern promised the country would continue to consider broader gun control measures on Monday, including issues such as licensing, registration and storage. New Zealand’s swift action is a stark contrast to the political stalemate in the US, where conservative politicians have blocked any substantial gun control laws for 25 years, despite frequent high-casualty mass shootings. The US’s last substantial action on gun control, in 1994, was a federal ban on military-style “assault weapons”. But the ban was written to expire in 10 years, and did not require Americans who already owned military-style guns to give up their weapons – it simply tried to regulate the manufacture and sale of new guns. When it expired in 2004, an in-depth evaluation of the loophole-ridden legislation found that it could not be clearly credited with any of the nation’s drop in violence. The consensus among Democratic politicians was that the ban had backfired politically against their party, and that gun control was not a winning issue for the American left. They largely abandoned the issue for more than a decade. Since the ban lifted, military-style rifles have become popular high-end acquisitions for American gun owners, and have become popular for target shooting, even as they have become infamous as the mass shooter’s weapon of choice. Some gun rights advocates argue that military-style rifles are necessary for self-defense, including self-defense in the home. While there are restrictions on “assault weapons” in some parts of the US, in many places today, Americans can buy an AR-15-style rifle before they are legally allowed to buy a beer.

  • Colorado sheriffs who refuse to enforce anti-gun 'red flag' law should 'resign,' state AG says
    Fox News

    Colorado sheriffs who refuse to enforce anti-gun 'red flag' law should 'resign,' state AG says

    Colorado's attorney general testified said week that country sheriffs vowing not to enforce the state's proposed anti-gun "red flag" bill should "resign" -- a challenge that threatened to ramp up tensions between state officials and local leaders who were already creating droves of so-called Second Amendment "sanctuary counties" to resist the legislation. Democrat Phil Weiser made the remarks, which were first reported by The Colorado Sun, while testifying before a state committee on Friday. Weiser has said that the red flag legislation, which would permit a court to the seizure of weapons from people determined to be a threat to others or themselves, would save lives, particularly in domestic violence situations. The proposed state law, House Bill 1177, is expected to secure passage in the Colorado legislature and be approved by the state's Democrat governor, Jared Polis.

  • Carlsbad considers resolution against New Mexico gun control
    San Francisco Chronicle

    Carlsbad considers resolution against New Mexico gun control

    CARLSBAD, N.M. (AP) — Officials in a southeastern New Mexico city will consider a resolution that declares they won't enforce gun laws that they believe violate gun owners' constitutional rights. The Carlsbad Current-Argus reports the Carlsbad City Council has scheduled a special meeting Thursday to consider declaring the city a sanctuary for the Second Amendment. Several New Mexico counties and cities have made similar declarations in response to a series of gun control measures that have gone before state lawmakers. Democratic Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham signed a bill earlier this month that expands mandatory background checks on firearm sales. The Legislature has also passed a bill that ensures

  • New Zealand attacks unite government on gun control. America stands divided.
    DailyWorld.com

    New Zealand attacks unite government on gun control. America stands divided.

    The United States, Australia and New Zealand share a historical heritage of frontier adventurism — the kind that bred a familiarity with firearms as tools for putting food on the table, or later as a sporting pastime. In the wake of that horror, the New Zealand government moved rapidly to announce that by next Monday, it will unveil plans for tightening gun laws that could potentially include a ban on military-style rifles and require registration of all guns. "As a Cabinet, we were absolutely unified and very clear," Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Monday. With the support of a conservative prime minister, Australia introduced gun licensing and registry, banned semi-automatic rifles, and enforced a firearm buyback that pulled 700,000 guns out of circulation.

  • New Zealand attacks unite government on gun control. America stands divided.
    Daily Record

    New Zealand attacks unite government on gun control. America stands divided.

    The United States, Australia and New Zealand share a historical heritage of frontier adventurism — the kind that bred a familiarity with firearms as tools for putting food on the table, or later as a sporting pastime. In the wake of that horror, the New Zealand government moved rapidly to announce that by next Monday, it will unveil plans for tightening gun laws that could potentially include a ban on military-style rifles and require registration of all guns. "As a Cabinet, we were absolutely unified and very clear," Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Monday. With the support of a conservative prime minister, Australia introduced gun licensing and registry, banned semi-automatic rifles, and enforced a firearm buyback that pulled 700,000 guns out of circulation.

  • New Zealand attacks unite government on gun control. America stands divided.
    USA TODAY Opinion

    New Zealand attacks unite government on gun control. America stands divided.

    The Second Amendment, as Justice Antonin Scalia wrote, is 'not a right to keep and carry any weapon whatsoever in any manner whatsoever': Our view

  • Republicans must follow Ardern's lead and stand up to the gun lobby
    the Guardian

    Republicans must follow Ardern's lead and stand up to the gun lobby

    Hours after 50 worshippers were killed at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern was already promising to tighten up the country's gun laws. New Zealand's response seems to have more in common with Scotland where the massacre at Dunblane primary school in 1996 led to a ban on all handguns.

  • 2nd Amendment Foundation: Gun control laws don't deter madmen
    Daily Record

    2nd Amendment Foundation: Gun control laws don't deter madmen

    New Zealand suspect acquired his guns legally, same as virtually all the killers in recent mass shootings here: Opposing view Gun control proponents argue that America could “learn something” from the horrendous attack on two New Zealand mosques. They are hoping that our citizens, gripped by emotion, will overlook the obvious and agree that law-abiding gun owners should face additional restrictions on their rights. The real lesson to be learned from the Christchurch massacre is that madmen aren't deterred by gun control laws, or laws against murder. Morality doesn't enter into their thinking, so honest people must be prepared for the unthinkable and be able to respond. The gun prohibition lobby

  • Republicans must follow Ardern's lead and stand up to the gun lobby
    the Guardian

    Republicans must follow Ardern's lead and stand up to the gun lobby

    Hours after 50 worshippers were killed at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern was already promising to tighten up the country's gun laws. New Zealand's response seems to have more in common with Scotland where the massacre at Dunblane primary school in 1996 led to a ban on all handguns. New Zealand's gun laws are lax; the UK's gun laws had already been tightened and semi-automatic centrefire rifles banned in the wake of the Hungerford massacre in 1987.