Islamic State

The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), also known as the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), officially known as the Islamic State (IS) and by its Arabic language acronym Daesh, is a Salafi jihadist militant group and former unrecognised proto-state that follows a fundamentalist, Salafi doctrine of Sunni Islam.
Read up on the latest news and discussion about the radical militant group.
  • Without territory or new recruits, Islamic State is in its death throes
    the Guardian

    Without territory or new recruits, Islamic State is in its death throes

    The leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, is still alive but hiding somewhere in the desert. Once, it held territory the size of the UK; now, it holds a square kilometre of the remote town of Baghouz in eastern Syria. In Iraq, these include the weakness of the state and security forces, the dominance of the Shia majority and the shortsightedness of its leaders, as well as the alienation and marginalisation of the Iraqi Sunni minority, long the extremists' core constituency. Syria remains an anarchic battleground of factions, militia and forces, where powers great and small, near and far, still seek advantage.

  • US-backed Syria force says IS holding 1,000 civilians
    HoustonChronicle.com

    US-backed Syria force says IS holding 1,000 civilians

    AL-OMAR OIL FIELD BASE, Syria (AP) — The U.S.-backed Syrian militia fighting the Islamic State in its last toehold in Syria says there are over 1,000 civilians trapped in the tiny area and that the militant group is preventing them from leaving. Mustafa Bali, a spokesman for the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces, tells The Associated Press Sunday that IS has closed all the roads in and out. SDF officials have said the extremists are hiding among civilians in a tented village and using a network of caves and tunnels. IS, which once ruled a proto-state in large parts of Syria and Iraq, is clinging to an area less than a square kilometer (square mile) in the village of Baghouz, in eastern Syria.

  • Death squads roam: A gripping dispatch from the 'last stand' of ISIS
    Daily Mail

    Death squads roam: A gripping dispatch from the 'last stand' of ISIS

    The civilians able to escape have fled. Now there are just an estimated 500 fighters, many of them foreigners, making the last stand of the Islamic State's 'caliphate' in a remote Syrian hamlet near the Iraqi border. They include some of the group's most battle-hardened veterans, many wearing suicide vests and using civilians for human shields as they attempt to resist the surrounding forces using tunnels drilled through the walls of houses in Baghouz. Once these feared jihadis ruled eight million people in an area the size of Britain, relying on savagery to impose their medieval creed, and social media to woo recruits from Britain and around the globe. But they have been pushed back into a fast-shrinking

  • https://www.oneindia.com

    The two Islamic State style terror acts in J&K

    New Delhi, Feb 16: The gruesome suicide attack on the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) on Thursday in Jammu and Kashmir was probably the second Islamic State (IS) style act in the state within a month. A suicide bomber, identified as Adil Ahmad Dar, affiliated to Pakistan-based terror outfit Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) rammed explosive laden van into two buses of a convoy of 78 vehicles carrying some 2,500 Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) personnel on Jammu-Srinagar Highway near Pulwama. Before being killed, Dar claimed lives of 40 CRPF personnel. CRPF DG RR Bhatnagar has said that a new dimension is added to terrorist activity in Kashmir as an explosive-laden vehicle was used to target a convoy

  • Woman jailed for fleeing to join terror group believes SHE is victim
    Daily Mail

    Woman jailed for fleeing to join terror group believes SHE is victim

    The family of an ISIS bride who is back on Britain's streets after she was jailed for joining Islamic State say she feels she has been 'victimised.'  Tareena Shakil, nicknamed the Towie jihadi, fled to Syria with her toddler son in October 2014. The only British woman to be jailed for joining Islamic State is now living in Birmingham after she was released from prison last summer, it has emerged. But her mother Mandy, 52, told the Sun her daughter is 'keeping her head down' and said 'You won't be able to find her' when asked to comment further. A family source also claimed Shakil felt 'victimised' after attention was placed back on British jihadis due to Shamima Begum - a teenage bride who begged

  • Reuters

    Sahel instability spreading to coastal West Africa: Burkina Faso

    Speaking at the Munich Security Conference, Minister Alpha Barry gave a bleak outlook of the situation more than six years after French troops intervened in Mali to stop Islamist militants advancing on the capital Bamako. The Sahel region has since suffered violence from militant groups linked to al Qaeda and Islamic State, trafficking and the emergence of armed groups in one of the world's poorest regions. The northern region of Burkina Faso, bordering Mali and Niger, has over the last 12 months been especially hard hit, leaving the government struggling to assert its authority since President Blaise Compaore was ousted in 2014 in a popular uprising.

  • Reuters

    Islamic State says attacked Nigerian governor's convoy

    MAIDUGURI, Nigeria (Reuters) - Islamic State claimed responsibility on Wednesday for an attack on the convoy of a state governor who was headed to a rally in northeastern Nigeria ahead of Saturday's presidential election. The group said in a statement on its Amaq news agency that 42 people were killed in Tuesday's attack on Borno state's governor. Official sources told Reuters earlier on Wednesday between three and 10 people were killed, and that some of them may have been beheaded. Boko Haram has waged a decade-long insurgency in Nigeria's northeast which has killed around 30,000 people and forced about 2 million to leave their homes. Islamic State West Africa Province, which split from Boko

  • The two Islamic State style terror acts in J&K
    https://www.oneindia.com

    The two Islamic State style terror acts in J&K

    New Delhi, Feb 16: The gruesome suicide attack on the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) on Thursday in Jammu and Kashmir was probably the second Islamic State (IS) style act in the state within a month. A suicide bomber, identified as Adil Ahmad Dar, affiliated to Pakistan-based terror outfit Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) rammed explosive laden van into two buses of a convoy of 78 vehicles carrying some 2,500 Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) personnel on Jammu-Srinagar Highway near Pulwama. Before being killed, Dar claimed lives of 40 CRPF personnel. CRPF DG RR Bhatnagar has said that a new dimension is added to terrorist activity in Kashmir as an explosive-laden vehicle was used to target a convoy

  • US News & World Report

    North Macedonia Says It Stopped Attack by Islamic State Supporters

    SKOPJE (Reuters) - Police in North Macedonia raided several locations on Friday to prevent a potential attack organized by the supporters of the Islamic State, the Interior Ministry said in a statement. The ministry said it launched the operation after exchanging information with a "partner country", without identifying the country. Items and devices linked to a possible attack were seized, the ministry said, without giving further details. The U.S. Embassy in Skopje also issued a security alert to its citizens traveling to North Macedonia on Friday warning of "a heightened risk of terrorist attacks inspired by extremist ideology in North Macedonia". The majority of North Macedonia's 2 million

  • Islamic State wreaks havoc as turbulent Nigeria nears vote
    HoustonChronicle.com

    Islamic State wreaks havoc as turbulent Nigeria nears vote

    Amina Sanusi was getting ready for morning prayers at her home in northeastern Nigeria when she heard gunshots and explosions. She scrambled into nearby bushes with her two children, but lost contact with her husband. Government soldiers in the fishing town of Baga on the shores of Lake Chad fled too, overwhelmed by the firepower of Islamist militants. Like thousands of others since an upsurge in attacks that started in December, Sanusi, 25, made a 200-kilometer (125-mile) journey by foot and by bus to a camp for displaced people in the Borno state capital, Maiduguri. "The soldiers tried, but it was too much for them,'' said Sanusi, wearing a black hijab and breast-feeding her daughter in the

  • BBC News

    Trump tells European countries to take back IS fighters

    President Trump has told the UK and other European allies to take back and put on trial more than 800 Islamic State (IS) group fighters captured in the final battle against the group. His tweet comes as US-backed Kurdish forces continue an assault on the last pocket of IS territory on the Syrian side of the Iraqi border. The IS fighters are being held by the Kurdish-led forces. Mr Trump added that the IS caliphate was "ready to fall." "The US does not want to watch as these ISIS fighters permeate Europe, which is where they are expected to go. We do so much, and spend so much - Time for others to step up and do the job that they are so capable of doing", he said in a tweet. Trump administration

  • Family from Manchester detained in Syria for links to Isil say they miss 'freedom and independence' in UK
    The Telegraph

    Family from Manchester detained in Syria for links to Isil say they miss 'freedom and independence' in UK

    A family from Manchester detained in Syria on suspicion of links to Isil has said they want to return to Britain for a better life for their children after being captured by Western-backed forces. Safiya Zaynab, 51, mother of daughters Shabina Aslam, 29, and Alireza Sabar, 17, from Didsbury, Mancs, said they missed their freedom and wanted to be allowed back home. They claimed a relative told them they were going on holiday to Turkey in 2014 but from there they “ended up in Syria”. “We don’t know how it happened and since then we have been trying to escape, but it has not been possible,” Ms Aslam said. The family was interviewed after being were picked up by the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) near the eastern Syrian town of Hajin in January by a freelance journalist, but the Telegraph is today revealing their identities. Families who escaped from the last two square-miles of Islamic State-held territory wait in a lorry to be taken to a camp for displaced people, near Baghuz Credit: Sam Tarling News of their detention came after it emerged Shamima Begum, one of the Bethnal Green schoolgirls who left the UK to join Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil), had been found in a camp in Syria. “We all miss our life before, we miss freedom, independence, no fear,” Ms Aslam told Jana Andert for Channel 4, saying that she also missed British food such as fish and chips. "We want to go back to England, back to my family, I want my children to have a normal life,” she said, clutching her young daughter while they waited at an SDF screening point. Renu, eldest sister of Shamima Begum, 15, holds her sister's photo while being interviewed by the media at New Scotland Yard Credit: PA Ms Aslam had two children with her husband while they were living inside the so-called caliphate, daughters Khaulah Waseem, three, and one-year-old Sarah Waseem. Alireza had one child, one-year-old son Qasem. Ms Aslam said she finished a degree at the Manchester University and was training to become a teacher before she travelled to the region. “But then everything changed,” she said. She claimed life inside Isil-held Syria was hard, particularly after her husband was killed a year ago. “You can’t trust anyone, we asked the Syrians and Iraqis to leave but no one wanted to help us. The culture was completely different,” said Ms Aslam, who is of Pakistani descent. The women say they thought they were going on holiday to Turkey. Whether their explanation is to believed remains to be seen Credit: Channel 4 “The Arabs never help the women, they just pushed them towards marriage,” she added. She called the jihadist group she is accused of joining “extreme” because of its use of suicide bombing, which she called "unIslamic". “I don’t regret anything because we came on a holiday, which then turned into this,” she said. “I don’t know how, it’s never been explained to me.” A general view of Roj camp in northern Syria near the Iraqi border, where 370 women from 46 different countries are being held due to their suspected links to Isil  Credit: Sam Tarling Speaking from his home in Didsbury on Friday, the women’s father and husband said he had split from his wife in 2014 and that he thought the family had since moved to Saudi Arabia. Father-of-five Sabar Aslam said he had not contact with wife Safiya for several years: “They left me four years ago and that’s the end of the story. She wasn’t happy with me. “They are not brave people they are very soft people. I don’t think they would be joining something like Isil,” he said. “The police have interviewed me many times. They asked me questions about them but they never said they were in Syria. “I thought she had gone to Saudi Arabia as all the time Safiya was talking about it. I thought she went there.” He claimed not to recognise the women interviewed in Channel 4’s video. It is not clear what role these women played in the jihadist group and whether they will be able to return home. The Telegraph understands the family is among at least seven British women being detained in camps around northern Syria for links to Isil, along with around 15 of their children. Their case highlights the growing problem the UK government faces. So far it has refused calls to repatriate any of its citizens detained in Syria, citing a security risk. Should they return prosecution will prove difficult, particularly if there is no evidence to prove the women knowingly joined Isil. Whether the government believes their story remains to be seen.

  • For your eyes only – what the head of MI6 is thinking
    The Telegraph

    For your eyes only – what the head of MI6 is thinking

    Seldom, if ever, has the chief of the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) given such a frank and wide ranging briefing to journalists on the threats facing Britain as he did on Friday at the Munich Security Conference in Germany.

  • Trump tells allies to take back IS fighters
    BBC News

    Trump tells allies to take back IS fighters

    President Trump has told the UK and other European allies to take back and put on trial more than 800 Islamic State (IS) group fighters captured in the final battle against the group. His tweet comes as US-backed Kurdish forces continue an assault on the last pocket of IS territory on the Syrian side of the Iraqi border. The IS fighters are being held by the Kurdish-led forces. Mr Trump added that the IS caliphate was "ready to fall." "The US does not want to watch as these ISIS fighters permeate Europe, which is where they are expected to go. We do so much, and spend so much - Time for others to step up and do the job that they are so capable of doing", he said in a tweet. Trump administration

  • MI6 boss warns of more IS attacks
    BBC News

    MI6 boss warns of more IS attacks

    The head of MI6 has warned that the Islamic State group is reorganising for more attacks despite its military defeat in Syria. Alex Younger, the UK's intelligence chief, also told of his concern about jihadists returning to Europe with "dangerous" skills and connections. They should expect to be investigated and possibly prosecuted, he said. His comments come after Shamima Begum, a teenager who ran away to join IS, said she wants to return to the UK. Ms Begum, now aged 19 and pregnant with her third child, said she had no regrets about travelling to Syria in 2015 but wanted to have her baby in Britain. Mr Younger told the Munich Security Conference that so far the return of IS militants had proved