Nature

Consistently stunning documentaries transport viewers to far-flung locations ranging from the torrid African plains to the chilly splendors of icy Antarctica. The show's primary focus is on animals and ecosystems around the world. A comic book based on the show, meant to be used an as educational tool for kids, was briefly distributed to museums and schools at no cost in the mid-2000s.
Keep up with the elements: animals, earth, air, fire, water and more.
  • Forbes

    Why TD Executives Are Banking On Sustainability

    Nicole Vadori remembers being in grade school and watching the news about a fire at a tire warehouse with big plumes of black smoke that would inevitably cause environmental damage and thinking at that moment, “how can adults let this happen?” Today Nicole is associate vice president and head of environment at TD Bank Group, where she spends her days finding ways to help reduce the bank's carbon footprint, mitigating climate risk in its investment activities, and helping to drive business initiatives that can create positive environmental and social impacts. I recently caught up with Nicole to talk about what TD is doing to help support the transition to a low-carbon economy, how the company

  • UK weather forecast: Britain braced for snow, freezing rain and ice as Met Office issues severe warnings
    The Independent

    UK weather forecast: Britain braced for snow, freezing rain and ice as Met Office issues severe warnings

    Forecasters expect “heavy freezing rain” to cause significant disruption throughout the day in the run-up to Christmas. The rare weather event is likely to lead to widespread black ice on roads and pavements and will affect southern Scotland, northern England and the Midlands. Drivers are advised to avoid travelling unless absolutely necessary, said Nicola Maxey, a meteorologist at the Met Office.

  • Greenhouse gases: Report says Quebecers are producing more despite climate change targets
    Montreal

    Greenhouse gases: Report says Quebecers are producing more despite climate change targets

    A report on energy use in Quebec says that Quebecers are using more greenhouse-gas-producing forms of fuel. The Chair of HEC Montreal's Energy Sector said in a report published Friday that more petroleum products were sold in Quebec compared to the previous year, even though gasoline is the most expensive form of fuel available compared to natural gas or electricity. The co-author of the report, Pierre-Olivier Pineau, noted that Quebec draws nearly 50 percent of all its energy from renewable sources, and that the number of sales of electric vehicles is on the rise. But he points out that if vehicle sales increase drastically, Hydro-Quebec will face challenges in meeting the demand for electricity.

  • Meet the peregrine falcon, the world's fastest-flying bird
    HoustonChronicle.com

    Meet the peregrine falcon, the world's fastest-flying bird

    Driving along the 3-mile road into the Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge, my wife, Kathy, and I spotted a raptor on the crossbar of a power pole about 75 yards away. “Peregrine falcon!” I alerted. “Let's drive slowly and ease up about 20 yards from the bird so you can get a photo before it takes off.” No other raptor has the distinct profile of a peregrine falcon. Its sleek, taut body held smartly upright when perched as though a soldier standing at attention; its long, pointed wings held closely against the body; its white, lightly spotted breast offset by a steel-toned blue-gray back; and its black hood with a dark bar down each side of the face like chin straps on a helmet all announce its

  • FloWater Reaches Milestone in Reducing Plastic Water Bottle Waste and Tackling Dehydration in the Workplace
    Business Wire

    FloWater Reaches Milestone in Reducing Plastic Water Bottle Waste and Tackling Dehydration in the Workplace

    With studies showing sales of plastic water bottles at an all-time high, the headlines continue on the devastating effects of plastic pollution. FloWater today announces that it has saved 100-million single-use plastic water bottles from the environment since its launch in 2013. Incubated in Silicon Valley, FloWater is disrupting the bottled water industry with a distributed and de-centralized water purification system that takes any potable tap water and transforms it into “bottled water” on tap—without the plastic.

  • https://www.oneindia.com

    Weather forecast for Dec 15: Chennai to see moderate rains as Cyclone 'Phethai' winds towards AP

    New Delhi, Dec 14: The depression over the Bay of Bengal continues to move northwestward at 18 km/h. It is expected to intensify on Friday and turn into a Cyclonic Storm while still over the sea by Saturday. Heavy rain is forecast for southern India from Saturday over Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. The Cyclone phethai may make landfall around Andhra Pradesh on Monday night and turn northeastward due to upper-level strong easterly winds. It will then weaken over eastern India. Here is the weather forecast for Bengaluru, Delhi, Hyderabad and Chennai on December 15. Bengaluru: The rainy spells have vacated and mostly dry weather conditions are now prevailing in India's Silicon Valley. As per Skymet

  • Nature up close: Spitfire, the little wolf that could
    CBS News

    Nature up close: Spitfire, the little wolf that could

    This time it is one known as "926." I've never known a wolf who I felt epitomized more succinctly what Aldo Leopold meant when he wrote "We reached the old wolf in time to watch a fierce green fire dying in her eyes," almost 70 years ago in his seminal work, "A Sand County Almanac." After watching her for almost seven years, I know that fire comes not from being the biggest, toughest wolf in the valley but simply from determination. Some researchers question the wolf hunt on the basis of economics alone. Depending on the source, Yellowstone wolves are worth a minimum of $35 million each year, the amount of money generated by tours led by wolf experts. The number of wolves in Yellowstone changes from year to year, but that is about $4,000,000 per wolf.

  • Chirp perp: Finches found in luggage at NY airport
    Reuters

    Chirp perp: Finches found in luggage at NY airport

    A man was caught at New York's JFK airport last weekend trying to smuggle dozens of South American finches into the country, a bird that Guyanese immigrants covet for chirping but officials fear could spread disease, officials said on Thursday. About 70 finches were found hidden inside a shipment of hair rollers at John F. Kennedy International Airport on Saturday when a U.S. Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialist inspected the unidentified male passenger's luggage. The birds may have been destined for sale to Guyanese immigrants for a game that involves betting on how often the finches chirp per minute, said Customs spokesman Anthony Bucci.

  • Waitrose to ban glitter in all own-brand products by 2020
    The Independent

    Waitrose to ban glitter in all own-brand products by 2020

    Waitrose has pledged to ban glitter from all its own-brand products by 2020. Joining the fight against plastic pollution, the retailer says that in two years time its cards, gift wraps, crackers, gift tags, flowers and plants will either be glitter-free, or use an environmentally-friendly alternative. “Reducing the impact of plastics on the environment is something our customers care passionately about,” said Tor Harris, head of CSR, health and agriculture for Waitrose & Partners.

  • Marine Corps says $3.6B for storm repairs at East Coast base
    Daily Mail

    Marine Corps says $3.6B for storm repairs at East Coast base

    WASHINGTON (AP) - When Marines from Camp Lejeune, N.C., were preparing for their upcoming deployment to the Middle East, they faced an unusual challenge: the beach they needed to train on had been washed away by Hurricane Florence. Using bulldozers and other equipment, they moved enough sand to rebuild a portion of Onslow Beach so Marines could practice moving on and off landing craft and get certified for their deployment. But almost immediately afterward, the ocean swept away the sand. Marine leaders are saying it will cost around $3.6 billion to repair the extensive damage to Camp Lejeune caused by the September hurricane that destroyed hundreds of buildings and facilities on the major East

  • Kristine Tompkins celebrates new Argentina marine parks
    Daily Mail

    Kristine Tompkins celebrates new Argentina marine parks

    American conservationist Kristine Tompkins said Thursday that the creation of Argentina's first marine national parks is a milestone that gets it close to meeting its U.N. recommended goal for 2020. Argentina's Congress on Wednesday approved the "Yaganes" and "Namuncura-Banco Burdwood II" parks in the southernmost Argentine sea, covering a combined area of 39,000 square miles (101,000 square kilometers). The measure increased the country's protected oceans to nearly 10 percent of its total territory, which is close to its commitment to the 2020 goal agreed on by the U.N.'s Convention on Biological Diversity. It also protects habitat and feeding grounds for penguins, sea lions, sharks and other marine species.

  • Satellite Spies Methane Bubbling up from Arctic Permafrost
    Scientific American

    Satellite Spies Methane Bubbling up from Arctic Permafrost

    For the first time, scientists have used a satellite to estimate how much methane is seeping into the atmosphere from Arctic lakes. Preliminary data presented this week at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Washington DC help to explain long-standing discrepancies between estimates of methane emissions from atmospheric measurements and data collected at individual lakes. As icy permafrost melts to form lakes, microbes break down organic matter in the thawing ground beneath the water and release methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Researchers have measured the amount of methane seeping out of hundreds of lakes, one by one, but estimating emissions across the Arctic remains a challenge.

  • Six dead animals at roadside petting zoo prompt felony charges
    MLive.com

    Six dead animals at roadside petting zoo prompt felony charges

    BRANDON TWP., MI – A man who operated a petting zoo at a roadside farm stand has been charged with animal cruelty and neglect in Oakland County after six of the animals died and others were sick or malnourished. Andrew E. Scott, 32, was arraigned Thursday, Dec. 13 on a single felony charge of cruelty and neglect of 10 or more animals in Oakland District Court, according to a statement from county officials. A witness who is familiar with horses stopped at the roadside farm stand in the 4500 block of Ramsey Road in Brandon Township and saw two miniature horses were too thin, the statement said. The witness contacted Oakland County Animal Control in October and investigators obtained a search warrant.

  • Framingham Kills Beavers After Dams Cause Public Safety Emergency
    CBS Boston

    Framingham Kills Beavers After Dams Cause Public Safety Emergency

    FRAMINGHAM (CBS) – Beaver dams in Framingham are causing big problems. The city calls it a public safety emergency and is euthanizing the animals. That has some people crying animal cruelty, but city officials say they have no choice. The problem is road flooding, leading to dangerous, icy conditions in two areas of Framingham. “The beavers are certainly the cause of it, but it's been exacerbated by the amount of precipitation we've had,” says Rob McArthur, Framingham's Conservation Administrator. The first area is off Salem End Rd. where a beaver dam has resulted in flooding downstream on Singletary Lane. “I'd say five times within the last three weeks, they've blocked the road off. I've been