Nature

Consistently stunning documentaries transport viewers to far-flung locations ranging from the torrid African plains to the chilly splendors of icy Antarctica. The show's primary focus is on animals and ecosystems around the world. A comic book based on the show, meant to be used an as educational tool for kids, was briefly distributed to museums and schools at no cost in the mid-2000s.
Keep up with the elements: animals, earth, air, fire, water and more.
  • Himachal reservoirs full to the brim, near danger mark as rains pound state
    Hindustan Times

    Himachal reservoirs full to the brim, near danger mark as rains pound state

    Water level in the major reservoirs has neared the danger mark as torrential rains continue to pound Himachal Pradesh. According to officials, Satluj, Beas and Yamuna rivers and their tributaries have been in spate in Kinnaur, Shimla, Kullu, Mandi, Bilaspur and Sirmaur districts. As per the data released by the State Emergency Operations Centre of state revenue department, the water level in NTPC's Koldam in Bilaspur district has reached 636.4 feet against the danger mark of 642 feet while the level at Chamera-1 in Chamba has reached 758 feet against the danger mark of 760 feet. The water level at Chamera-II was measured at 1,156.7 feet against danger level of 1,162 feet and 1,384 .3 feet recorded

  • Velva's Goldade recalls military maneuvers in Alaska
    The Charlotte Observer

    Velva's Goldade recalls military maneuvers in Alaska

    Velva's Goldade recalls military maneuvers in Alaska The Cold War was heating up in the mid-1950s when Joe Goldade enlisted in the U.S. Army and took on an assignment that isn't much talked about more than 60 years later. Goldade, 83, of Velva, participated with the 4th Infantry in the Moosehorn Maneuver in 1955-56 in the Big Delta of Alaska. The Arctic training was rough, and not much information has been shared about those experiences over the years. "We never talked about it too much," Goldade said. "That was really misery." Goldade was living in Rugby when he joined the Army at age 18, looking for a life he thought might be better than farming and milking cows. He enlisted for two years.

  • Florida's iconic palm trees threatened by invasive disease
    Associated Press

    Florida's iconic palm trees threatened by invasive disease

    Florida's iconic palm trees are under attack from a fatal disease that turns them to dried crisps in months, with no chance for recovery once they become ill. Spread by a rice-sized, plant-hopping insect, lethal bronzing has gone from a small infestation on Florida's Gulf Coast to a nearly statewide problem in just over a decade. Tens of thousands of palm trees have died from the bacterial disease, and the pace of its spread is increasing, adding to environmental woes of a state already struggling to save its other arboreal icon, citrus trees, from two other diseases.

  • Sanford Lab's water treatment plant filters wastewater
    The Charlotte Observer

    Sanford Lab's water treatment plant filters wastewater

    Sanford Lab's water treatment plant filters wastewater Ever since the wastewater treatment plant reopened in 2008, the Sanford Underground Research Facility located on the Yates Shaft campus has been making improvements and modifications to its treatment process. "The main change that we've made to the plant is putting in capabilities to deal with the iron that we get in the water from the underground," said Mike Headley, laboratory director at the Sanford Lab. Headley explained that after mining activities ceased in 2002, the shafts and drifts were allowed to fill with water that seeped in through the ground. That water accumulated and drew out the iron oxide from the rock walls of the mine.

  • Flood threat looms over 130 Tarn Taran villages
    Hindustan Times

    Flood threat looms over 130 Tarn Taran villages

    As the water level in Sutlej and Beas rivers reached near the danger mark, residents of 130 villages in Tarn Taran district are living under fear. The district administration rescued 34 people from two villages situated along the Sutlej river. On Sunday, the water level in Sutlej and Beas rivers was recorded at 70,000 cusecs and 67,000 cusecs, respectively. “On Sunday water from Sutlej river entered some parts of Sabran and Kuttiwala villages. We rescued 34 people from the villages,” said deputy commissioner Pardeep Kumar Sabarwal. The administration has also set up 11 relief camps in various government schools and gurdwaras of the district. Owing to a breach in a Dhusi bundh in Sutlej river,

  • the Guardian

    National Trust objects to plans for big salmon farm off Hebridean isle

    The National Trust for Scotland has warned that a large salmon farm beside the Hebridean island of Canna could destroy the island's culture and wildlife. The trust, Scotland's largest heritage charity, said the proposed fish farm posed unacceptable risks to the sea and the birdlife around the tiny island, and would put its booming tourism economy under great strain. Mowi, the world's largest aquaculture company, has tabled outline plans with Highland council to install eight super-sized fish pens close to Canna's shoreline, to be stocked with 2,500 tonnes of organic salmon. The NTS, which was given the island by the Gaelic folklorist John Lorne Campbell in 1981, has tabled a formal objection to Mowi's proposals, accusing it of submitting flawed, incomplete evidence about the site's environmental and economic impact.

  • https://www.oneindia.com

    Flood alert for Delhi as Yamuna likely to cross danger mark today

    New Delhi, Aug 19: The Delhi government on Sunday sounded a flood alert for the city and asked people in low-lying areas to vacate their homes as the water level in the Yamuna river is expected to cross the danger mark on Monday, East Delhi district magistrate said in an order. The Yamuna was flowing at 203.37 metres on Sunday evening and its water level is expected to rise further to 207 metres on Monday following heavy rains and 8.28 lakh cusecs water being released from Haryana's Hathini Kund barrage. The danger mark is 205.33 metres. "Water level is rising due to heavy rains as well as the release of water from Hathini Kund Barrage and water level of Yamuna may rise up to 207 metres by 10

  • Iceland commemorates first glacier lost to climate change
    AFP Relax News

    Iceland commemorates first glacier lost to climate change

    Iceland on Sunday honoured the passing of Okjokull, its first glacier lost to climate change, as scientists warn that some 400 others on the subarctic island risk the same fate. Iceland's Prime Minister Katrin Jakobsdottir and former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson also attended the event, as well as hundreds of scientists, journalists and members of the public who trekked to the site. "I hope this ceremony will be an inspiration not only to us here in Iceland but also for the rest of the world, because what we are seeing here is just one face of the climate crisis," Jakobsdottir told AFP.

  • Magnitude 2.6 earthquake strikes near San Leandro, CA
    San Francisco Chronicle

    Magnitude 2.6 earthquake strikes near San Leandro, CA

    The United States Geological Survey reports a preliminary magnitude 2.6 earthquake struck near San Leandro, CA on Sunday. The quake hit at 8:25 PM local time at a depth of 4 kilometers. There was no initial word on damage or injury resulting from the quake. More information on this earthquake is available on the USGS event page. See the latest USGS quake alerts, report feeling earthquake activity and tour interactive fault maps in the earthquake section.

  • HotSpots H2O: Drought and Unrest Push Residents Out of Central America's Dry Corridor
    Circle of Blue WaterNews

    HotSpots H2O: Drought and Unrest Push Residents Out of Central America's Dry Corridor

    The Stream, August 16, 2019: Microplastics Reach Remote Arctic Waters

  • The Charlotte Observer

    Paul Simon joins environmentalists at Hawaii forest preserve

    Paul Simon joins environmentalists at Hawaii forest preserve Musician Paul Simon has joined environmentalists attempting to reinvigorate a Hawaii woodland by planting a tree during a ceremony on Maui. The Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported Friday that the celebrated singer-songwriter joined Auwahi Forest Restoration Project volunteers seeking to revive the area's plant life. Simon helped plant a lama tree and participated in chants with the group following a helicopter tour. The part-time Maui resident performed two environmental benefit concerts at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center earlier in the week that drew more than 8,000 attendees. Simon plans to donate his proceeds to the Auwahi project

  • Poles wade through Baltic 'like herrings' to commune with the sea
    Reuters

    Poles wade through Baltic 'like herrings' to commune with the sea

    The "Herring March" was set up by Radoslaw Tyslewicza in 2002 to raise environmental awareness and understanding of the sea. "Anyone in Poland - in Warsaw or Krakow - washing the dishes or flushing the toilet - that water goes here to the Baltic (Sea) and affects our ecosystem," Tyslewicza said.

  • Rain, storms break through dry August spell
    The Detroit News

    Rain, storms break through dry August spell

    This month, there have been five days where more than one-tenth of an inch of rain has been recorded at Detroit Metro Airport. Traces of rain were reported at the airport in Romulus over the past week on Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, and on Aug. 12 and 13, National Weather Service data said. However, over the 48 hours comprising Aug. 12-13, strong storms dumped as much as 3-6 inches of rain elsewhere in the region, sparking flooding and road closures. The numbers reveal a prevailing trend as the dog days of summer 2019 envelop southeast Michigan forecasters say: drier air plus fewer chances for severe weather sparking hit-or-miss downpours. “It's the nature of the beast with convection,” said

  • Business Standard India

    Wildlife now roam where US once manufactured its deadliest weapons

    From a tiny Pacific island to a leafy Indiana forest, a handful of sites where the United States manufactured and tested some of the most lethal weapons known to humankind are now peaceful havens for wildlife. The government converted them into refuges under US Fish and Wildlife Service management, and they now protect black bears and black-footed ferrets, coral reefs and brushy steppes, rare birds and imperiled salmon. But the cost of the conversions is staggering, and some critics say the sites have not been scrubbed well enough of pollutants to make them safe for humans. The military, the US Department of Energy and private companies have spent more than $57 billion to clean up the six heavily polluted sites, according to figures gathered by The Associated Press from military and civil agencies.