Politics

Politics is the process of making decisions that apply to members of a group. It refers to achieving and exercising positions of governance—organized control over a human community, particularly a state. In modern nation states, people have formed political parties to represent their ideas. They agree to take the same position on many issues, and agree to support the same changes to law and the same leaders. An election is usually a competition between different parties.
The latest news and discussion about what's happening in the world.
  • Iranian official Javad Zarif arrives unexpectedly at G7 amid tensions. Trump's response? 'No comment'
    USA TODAY

    Iranian official Javad Zarif arrives unexpectedly at G7 amid tensions. Trump's response? 'No comment'

    Iranian official Mohammad Zarif arrived unexpectedly at the G7 meeting in France, a dramatic move that seemed likely to highlight U.S. isolation.

  • Steve King Is Broke And Has Been Abandoned by His Colleagues as He Runs for Re-Election
    The Daily Beast

    Steve King Is Broke And Has Been Abandoned by His Colleagues as He Runs for Re-Election

    Joshua Lott/GettyAs he gears up for a difficult re-election cycle, Rep. Steve King’s campaign is strapped for cash. Individual donations to the Iowa Republican are down considerably from past cycles and support from corporate donors and King’s own colleagues have vanished entirely.King has not received a single contribution this year from a political action committee associated with a sitting member of Congress. Corporate PACs and interest groups have also completely shunned him. Through the first six months of the year, King received just two contributions from third party political entities: $2,000 donations from PACs associated with two former members of Congress, Lamar Smith (R-TX) and the infamous Todd Akin (R-MO).It is a remarkable though not entirely unpredictable abandonment of a sitting member of Congress. Though he was always controversial and further to the right than most of his colleagues, King has burned virtually all his bridges in the party this year with outlandish comments about white supremacy and abortion.Steve King and Nine More Republicans High-Fiving White NationalistsBut while those comments have made King a pariah in the party—with House Republican leaders stripping him of his committee assignments—King has refused to leave office. Now, as he faces the toughest campaign since he was first elected in 2002, he is doing so with a potentially catastrophic lack of resources. The $18,365 that King’s campaign had in the bank at the end of June was the least cash on hand he’s ever reported after the first six months of a cycle.King is dealing with that lack of resources as he faces very immediate threats to his incumbency. His 2018 Democratic opponent, former professional baseball player J.D. Scholten, lost by fewer than three points last year, and is making another run for the seat. This time around King also has a formidable Republican primary opponent, state senator Randy Feenstra, who has already scored endorsements from influential Iowans such as evangelical leader Bob Vander Plaats. At the end of July, Feenstra’s campaign committee reported having $337,314.30 cash on hand, compared to King’s $18,000. Things weren’t always so financially dire for King. Throughout his time in the House, he has received more than $3 million from political groups associated with private companies, trade associations, members of Congress, and ideological advocacy groups. That support peaked during the 2012 cycle, when such groups donated nearly $700,000 to his re-election campaign.King’s top industry donors throughout his career, according to an analysis of Federal Election Commission records, were the American Bankers Association, the National Association of Homebuilders, AT&T;, Crystal Sugars, and the Rain and Hail Insurance Society. All of them last donated to King during the 2018 election cycle but have so far declined to do so in this cycle. In fact, some are even funding his primary challenger. At least six industry PACs that have donated to King in the past, including those affiliated with shipping giant UPS and trade associations representing construction and agricultural firms, have chipped in to Feenstra’s campaign this year instead.Contributions from Republican Party organs have also evaporated completely. King never relied too heavily on such donations—he generally received about $5,000 per cycle from GOP committees, with the most, about $32,000, coming during the 2010 cycle. But it appears he’ll be fighting for re-election next year without any financial assistance from his party, which is raising record sums this year.Trump Has Remade the World in Steve King’s ImageFar from supporting King’s re-election, top Republicans are pressuring him to resign. Rep. Liz Cheney, the fourth-ranking House Republican official, reiterated those calls last week after King made outlandish comments opposing abortion for rape victims.One of King’s only two PAC contributors this year came from former Rep. Todd Akin, who lost his seat in Congress after making his own infamous remarks about abortion in such cases. His group, Takin Back America, donated to King’s campaign in February, just weeks after King denounced criticism of white supremacy.“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization,” King said in an interview with The New York Times. “How did that language become offensive?”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

  • Candidates hope to replicate Ocasio-Cortez's tactics across the country
    Yahoo News

    Candidates hope to replicate Ocasio-Cortez's tactics across the country

    Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., stunned the political world last year when she pulled off an upset victory against a 10-term incumbent who held a leadership position in the Democratic caucus. Now candidates are looking to replicate some of her tactics to take on Democratic incumbents across the country. According to the group the Justice Democrats, which backed Ocasio-Cortez in her race, the first-time candidate succeeded in part because of her unique social media strategy, a refusal to take money from large corporations and her recognition of issues that resonate with millennials.

  • Lindsey Graham warns Trump not to pull all U.S. forces out of Afghanistan
    Politico

    Lindsey Graham warns Trump not to pull all U.S. forces out of Afghanistan

    Trump has long been eager to withdraw American troops out of the country.

  • 'We all know he's unfit': Joe Walsh to challenge Trump in Republican primary
    The Guardian

    'We all know he's unfit': Joe Walsh to challenge Trump in Republican primary

    * Former Tea Party congressman is vocal conservative critic * Opinion: Trump seems to think he’s an emperorJoe Walsh, 57, served one term as a Republican representative from Illinois between 2011 and 2013 before losing his bid for re-election. Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/APJoe Walsh, a talk radio host and former congressman, said on Sunday he would challenge Donald Trump for the 2020 Republican presidential nomination.“We have someone in the White House who we all know is unfit,” Walsh said in a video announcing his candidacy. Walsh said Trump “lies virtually every time he opens his mouth” and places his own interests over those of the country.Walsh, 57, served one term as a Republican representative from Illinois between 2011 and 2013 before losing his bid for re-election. Initially an enthusiastic supporter of Trump, he has latterly been one of the president’s most vocal conservative critics.He becomes the second former elected official to make a long-shot attempt to wrest the Republican nomination from Trump, who according to recent polls has an approval rating among Republicans as high as 88%.The president’s other challenger – Bill Weld, a former governor of Massachusetts and the Libertarian candidate for vice-president in 2016 – has struggled to gain a foothold in his campaign and trails Trump in polls by 72 percentage points, according to an average compiled by RealClearPolitics.Speaking to ABC’s This Week on Sunday, Walsh said Trump polled so strongly among Republicans because “they don’t have an alternative”.“Most of my former colleagues up on the Hill,” he said, “they agree privately with everything I’m saying”. Such elected Republicans did not stand up to Trump, he said, because “they’re scared to death”.Walsh said the 25th amendment, the untested constitutional mechanism for removing a president deemed unfit for office, “should be looked at”.Sunday’s announcement represented a sharp turnaround for Walsh, who in October 2016 declared on Twitter that “if Trump loses, I’m grabbing my musket”.Walsh was elected to the House of Representatives in the “Tea Party wave” midterm elections of November 2010, when rightwing conservatives spearheaded a backlash against Barack Obama’s presidency.He came under sharp criticism during his time in Congress for saying he could not afford to pay child support to his ex-wife, despite lending $35,000 to his congressional campaign fund.“I helped create Trump,” Walsh told ABC. “And … that’s not an easy thing to say.”He continued: “I went to Washington eight years ago, part of the Tea Party class, wanted to shake Washington up.“I got involved in the battles. And there were plenty of times where I went beyond the policy and the idea differences, and I got personal, and I got hateful. I said some ugly things about President Obama that I regret. And it’s difficult, but I think that helped create Trump. And I feel responsible for that.”Asked if he had really believed Obama was a Muslim and a traitor, as he claimed, Walsh said: “God no. And I have apologised for that.”Walsh said his campaign would focus on Iowa and New Hampshire and being “on TV as much as we can”.“I think this thing … will catch on like wildfire,” he said.

  • Trump's GOP Primary Challengers Float Invoking The 25th Amendment To Remove Him
    HuffPost

    Trump's GOP Primary Challengers Float Invoking The 25th Amendment To Remove Him

    "He’s nuts. He’s erratic. He’s cruel," former Rep. Joe Walsh said of the president. "He doesn’t give a damn about America.”

  • Former Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh announces he will challenge Trump in Republican primary
    USA TODAY

    Former Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh announces he will challenge Trump in Republican primary

    Former GOP Rep. Joe Walsh of Illinois officially announced his primary challenge to Donald Trump on Sunday. He said Trump is "unfit" to be president.

  • US, Japan agree to trade deal at G-7 summit, as Trump says allies 'respect' China tariff war
    Good Morning America

    US, Japan agree to trade deal at G-7 summit, as Trump says allies 'respect' China tariff war

    In an unexpected announcement at the Group of 7 summit, President Trump and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said they have agreed in principle to a trade deal following months of negotiations. Trump said that the United States and Japan planned to sign the agreement around the same time as the United Nations General Assembly in New York this September. The deal will focus on "agriculture, industrial tarries and digital trade," per U.S. Trade Rep Lighthizer.

  • Larry Kudlow on Trump’s ‘Second Thoughts’ Remarks: ‘He Didn’t Exactly Hear the Question’
    The Daily Beast

    Larry Kudlow on Trump’s ‘Second Thoughts’ Remarks: ‘He Didn’t Exactly Hear the Question’

    White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow attempted to spin President Trump’s remarks Sunday morning in which he expressed regret over his escalating trade war with China, claiming that the president didn’t “hear the question” when asked if he had second thoughts.During a breakfast meeting with British prime minister Boris Johnson at the G7 on Sunday morning, Trump told reporters that he had “second thoughts about everything” when asked if he had second thoughts on ordering American companies to no longer do business with China.Appearing on CNN’s State of the Union later in the morning, Kudlow was immediately confronted with Trump’s comments by guest host Brianna Keilar. The Trump adviser, however, insisted that the president was being misinterpreted.“Well, look, if I can reinterpret that,” Kudlow noted, “I mean, he spoke to us, he didn’t exactly hear the question. Actually, what he was intending to say, he always has second thoughts and actually had second thoughts about possibly a higher tariff response to China.”He added: “So it was not to remove the tariff. He was thinking about a higher tariff response. Having said that, we’re staying with the policy that was announced on Friday, I believe, a five percent increase on the two tariffs.”Looking for clarification, Keilar asked Kudlow if Trump was saying that he may want to further increase tariffs on China, but wasnt currently going to do so. Kudlow agreed that was the case.“That is absolutely correct,” he stated. “That was his thought, it somehow got misinterpreted. I’m not sure he heard the question altogether. It was a very crowded room.”Kudlow’s attempts at clarifying Trump’s “second thoughts” remarks came on the heels of White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham’s own spin.“The President was asked if he had ‘any second thought on escalating the trade war with China.’ His answer has been greatly misinterpreted,” she said in a statement. “President Trump responded in the affirmative—because he regrets not raising the tariffs higher.”Elsewhere in the CNN interview, Kudlow clashed with Keilar, repeatedly insisting that she was taking Johnson out of context when he said at the G7 that he does not like tariffs as a whole.“Larry, what’s out of context?” Keilar pushed back at one point. “We just rolled video. What is out of context with that quote?”Kudlow said he was in the meeting with Johnson and that it “all depends on context,” prompting the CNN host to point out that the British prime minister’s comments came directly from that meeting.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

  • Top aides say Trump still determined to hike China tariffs
    Politico

    Top aides say Trump still determined to hike China tariffs

    Trump confused the situation Sunday when asked at the G7 summit whether he was having second thoughts about ratcheting up the trade war with China.

  • Trump 'not happy' after N. Korea's Kim oversees latest rocket test
    AFP

    Trump 'not happy' after N. Korea's Kim oversees latest rocket test

    North Korean leader Kim Jong Un supervised the test-firing of a high-tech rocket system, state media reported Sunday, prompting criticism from US President Donald Trump, who said he was "not happy" with the latest launch. Pyongyang fired what appeared to be two short-range ballistic missiles on Saturday, South Korea's military said, the latest in a series of recent launches in protest at the South's joint exercises with the US, which wrapped up last week. North Korea's official news agency described the weapon as a "super-large multiple rocket launcher".

  • Donald Trump says US, Japan have reached agreement 'in principle' on new trade pact
    USA TODAY

    Donald Trump says US, Japan have reached agreement 'in principle' on new trade pact

    President Trump said Sunday the U.S. and Japan have agreed in principle on a new trade deal that calls for the Japanese to buy U.S. surplus corn.

  • EXCLUSIVE: Joe Walsh announces Republican primary challenge against President Trump
    Good Morning America

    EXCLUSIVE: Joe Walsh announces Republican primary challenge against President Trump

    Conservative firebrand former Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh announced Sunday with ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos on ABC's "This Week" that he's launching a long-shot Republican presidential primary challenge against President Donald Trump. "I'm going to run for president," Walsh told Stephanopoulos in an exclusive interview. When Stephanopoulos pointed out the massive uphill climb Walsh has in front of him in the primary thanks to Trump's overwhelmingly high approval rating within the party, the controversial former congressman argued that conservatives don't have an alternative to the president.

  • U.S. and Japan strike trade deal ‘in principle’
    Politico

    U.S. and Japan strike trade deal ‘in principle’

    Abe said the agreement followed “a series of intensive negotiations.”

  • Former Rep. Joe Walsh To Challenge Trump In Republican Primary
    HuffPost

    Former Rep. Joe Walsh To Challenge Trump In Republican Primary

    After years of repeating some of Trump's most bigoted claims, the former legislator now says the president is a "racial arsonist who encourages bigotry."