Politics

Politics is the process of making decisions that apply to members of a group. It refers to achieving and exercising positions of governance—organized control over a human community, particularly a state. In modern nation states, people have formed political parties to represent their ideas. They agree to take the same position on many issues, and agree to support the same changes to law and the same leaders. An election is usually a competition between different parties.
The latest news and discussion about what's happening in the world.
  • Sarah Sanders says CNN's April Ryan has called for her ‘decapitation’
    Yahoo News

    Sarah Sanders says CNN's April Ryan has called for her ‘decapitation’

    White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders on Monday accused CNN analyst April Ryan of using violent imagery in calling for her firing.

  • Supreme Court takes up major gay, transgender job discrimination cases
    Reuters

    Supreme Court takes up major gay, transgender job discrimination cases

    The Supreme Court on Monday agreed to decide whether U.S. law banning workplace discrimination on the basis of sex protects gay and transgender workers, as the conservative-majority court waded into a fierce dispute involving a divisive social issue. At issue in the high-profile legal fight is whether gay and transgender people are covered by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bars employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of sex as well as race, color, national origin and religion. The court will take up two cases concerning gay people who have said they were fired due to their sexual orientation, one involving a New York skydiving instructor named Donald Zarda and another brought by a former county child welfare services coordinator from Georgia named Gerald Bostock.

  • Supreme Court takes on LGBT employment discrimination
    Good Morning America

    Supreme Court takes on LGBT employment discrimination

    The U.S. Supreme Court announced Monday that it will hear three high-profile cases involving employment discrimination against LGBT Americans. Together, the court will determine whether federal civil rights protections extend to include sexual orientation and gender identity. The cases center on Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of "sex." The justices will consider whether the term covers sexual orientation and gender identity -- a question over which lower courts have divided.

  • Trump's critics say revised NAFTA has 'minimal projected gains'
    Yahoo Finance

    Trump's critics say revised NAFTA has 'minimal projected gains'

    A new report says the revised North American Free Trade Agreement will boost U.S. economy and add 176,000 jobs , but critics say it's not enough.

  • President Trump, Trump Org sue House Oversight Committee chairman over subpoena
    Good Morning America

    President Trump, Trump Org sue House Oversight Committee chairman over subpoena

    President Donald Trump and the Trump Organization on Monday filed suit against the Democratic chairman of the House Oversight Committee, Rep. Elijah Cummings, seeking relief from his subpoena request for the president’s financial records. "The Democrat Party, with its newfound control of the U.S. House of Representatives, has declared all-out political war against President Donald J. Trump.

  • Supreme Court agrees to decide if sexual orientation, gender identity should get federal job protection
    USA TODAY

    Supreme Court agrees to decide if sexual orientation, gender identity should get federal job protection

    The Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether federal job discrimination laws apply to sexual orientation and gender identity.

  • Trump Administration Tightens Sanctions ‘To Bring Iran’s Oil Exports to Zero’
    National Review

    Trump Administration Tightens Sanctions ‘To Bring Iran’s Oil Exports to Zero’

    The Trump administration has stepped up efforts to completely eliminate Iran's oil export market, announcing Monday the elimination of sanctions exemptions that allowed the rogue nation to continue exporting oil to a select group of nations.The Trump administration last year granted six-month waivers to eight countries, exempting them from the wide-ranging sanctions implemented as part of the unilateral U.S. withdrawal from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal. The elimination of those exemptions, which Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will officially announce Monday afternoon, will likely devastate the already struggling Iranian economy.“President Donald J. Trump has decided not to reissue Significant Reduction Exceptions (SREs) when they expire in early May,” the White House said in a statement. “This decision is intended to bring Iran’s oil exports to zero, denying the regime its principal source of revenue.”Crude futures spiked to six-month highs on news of the move, which is expected to eliminate 1 million barrels per day from the global market beginning May 2.In response, Iranian officials have threatened to close the Strait of Hormuz, a narrow waterway through which one fifth of the world's traded oil supply travels.“If we are prevented from using it, we will close it,”Alireza Tangsiri, head of the Revolutionary Guard Corps navy force, told the state-run Fars news agency. “In the event of any threats, we will not have the slightest hesitation to protect and defend Iran’s waterway.”China, the largest buyer of Iranian crude, spoke out against the move on Monday.“China’s cooperation with Iran is open, transparent, reasonable and legitimate, and should be respected,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters during a regular briefing.

  • 10 Foods That Are Actually Banned in the United States
    MyRecipes

    10 Foods That Are Actually Banned in the United States

    The U.S. restricts foods many countries adore.

  • Trump Sues House Oversight Chairman to Block Subpoena of His Financial Records
    The Daily Beast

    Trump Sues House Oversight Chairman to Block Subpoena of His Financial Records

    Reuters / Kevin LamarqueDonald Trump has taken the extraordinary step of suing the chairman of the House Oversight Committee in a desperate attempt to prevent a congressional subpoena of the president’s closely held financial records.In a filing revealed Monday morning, the president’s lawyers argue the subpoena oversteps constitutional limits imposed on Congress and charge “Democrats are singularly obsessed with finding something they can use to damage the president politically.”Last month, Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) subpoenaed Mazars, an accounting firm enlisted by Trump and his company, in an attempt to get his hands on the president’s financial records. He requested documents related to Trump’s finances stretching back 10 years.In court documents, lawyers for the Trump Organization argue that any oversight of Trump is illegitimate unless it is meant to advance a legislative interest. Meaning, they think the committee has no need to look at the president’s finances because there’s no legislation they can build off of it.In the filing, Trump’s lawyers complain: “The Democrat Party, with its newfound control of the U.S. House of Representatives, has declared all-out political war against President Donald J. Trump. Subpoenas are their weapon of choice.”It goes on: “Chairman Cummings’ subpoena of Mazars lacks a legitimate legislative purpose... Its goal is to expose plaintiffs’ private financial information for the sake of exposure, with the hope that it will turn up something that Democrats can use as a political tool against the president now and in the 2020 election.”Cummings’ request came after estranged Trump lawyer Michael Cohen raised questions about whether his former boss used to inflate or deflate the true value of his financial assets to help him carry out his business dealings.The chairman specifically requested documents related to Trump and the Trump Organization that were used in a failed attempt by the president to purchase the Buffalo Bills NFL franchise.“Mr. Cohen produced to the committee financial statements from 2011, 2012, and 2013 that raise questions about the president’s representations of his financial affairs on these forms and on other disclosures, particularly relating to the president’s debts,” his letter to Mazars stated. “Several of these documents appear to have been signed by your firm.”Cummings later explained: “We are following up on specific allegations regarding the president’s actions based on corroborating documents obtained by the committee, and we will continue our efforts to conduct credible, robust, and independent oversight.”During his testimony before the Oversight Committee, Cohen said that between 2011 and 2013, he gave Trump’s financial statements to Deutsche Bank with the aim of getting a loan to purchase the Bills franchise. According to Cohen, Trump increased his net worth from $4.56 billion in 2012 to $8.66 billion in 2013, much of it based on the addition of “brand value.” Cohen said Trump would inflate his total assets to get friendlier treatment from banks.Mazars said last week that it “will respect the legal process and fully comply with its legal obligations.”Read more at The Daily Beast.

  • Donald Trump moves to cut off Iran oil exports; decision could roil markets
    USA TODAY

    Donald Trump moves to cut off Iran oil exports; decision could roil markets

    Seeking to cut off Iran's oil exports, President Donald Trump has decided against renewing waivers on Iranian oil sales, the administration said.

  • Israel's Netanyahu praises Trump move to end waivers on Iran oil
    AFP

    Israel's Netanyahu praises Trump move to end waivers on Iran oil

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu praised a White House announcement on Monday ending sanctions exemptions for Iran's oil customers, calling it "of great importance" in boosting pressure on Tehran. "The decision by President (Donald) Trump and the United States administration is of great importance to increase the pressure on the Iranian terrorist regime," Netanyahu said in a statement. Iran is Israel's main enemy, and Netanyahu has been in full support of the Trump administration's aggressive stance against Tehran.

  • Cuba Is a Problem That Trump Is Making Worse
    Bloomberg

    Cuba Is a Problem That Trump Is Making Worse

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- President Trump and his officials have taken steps lately to make things harder for Cuba, aiming to persuade its government to stop helping Venezuela’s embattled tyrant, Nicolas Maduro. That’s a worthy goal, and Cuba’s material support for Maduro is certainly objectionable, but this is the wrong way to get results.

  • Afghan Supreme Court allows Ghani term to cover delay to election
    Reuters

    Afghan Supreme Court allows Ghani term to cover delay to election

    Afghanistan's Supreme Court has ruled that President Ashraf Ghani can stay in office until a much-delayed presidential election, which is due to be held after his mandate expires next month, officials said. The election, originally scheduled for April this year, has been postponed twice to allow more time to organize the poll, first to July and then to Sept. 28, well after the official end of Ghani's five-year term on May 22. Ghani, seeking a second term, has ruled that out.

  • Barr's Mueller report rollout was disgraceful. I can't believe it but I miss Jeff Sessions.
    USA TODAY Opinion

    Barr's Mueller report rollout was disgraceful. I can't believe it but I miss Jeff Sessions.

    Barr's reputation is as battered as Trump's. Sessions at least had one redeeming feature: He tried to maintain the Justice Department's independence.

  • Negotiations between Trump, North Korea at a standstill, but optimism still in force at DMZ
    USA TODAY

    Negotiations between Trump, North Korea at a standstill, but optimism still in force at DMZ

    Patrick Gauchat’s workspace is a minefield – a thin swath of isolated territory, crowded with tanks, artillery, and thousands of tense soldiers.