Russia investigation

The ongoing Special Counsel investigation is a United States law enforcement and counterintelligence investigation of the Russian government's efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, including an investigation of any possible links and/or coordination between Donald Trump's presidential campaign and the Russian government, "and any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation.
Latest news and discussion surrounding the Russia investigation.
  • Brooke Mueller’s Family ‘Can’t Force Her’ to Go to Rehab After Alleged Relapse: Source
    People

    Brooke Mueller’s Family ‘Can’t Force Her’ to Go to Rehab After Alleged Relapse: Source

    Brooke Mueller’s Family ‘Can’t Force Her’ to Go to Rehab: Source

  • Reuters

    Founder of Germany's Evonik, Werner Mueller, dies aged 73

    Werner Mueller, the founder of German chemicals group Evonik and a former economy minister, has died aged 73, the company said on Tuesday. Mueller, who also set up the RAG foundation, stepped down as chairman of RAG and Evonik's supervisory board last year due to ill health. The foundation is a majority shareholder in Evonik and was set up by Mueller to help deal with the costs of winding down the hard coal mining industry in western Germany and to try to reduce the impact on the Ruhr industrial region.

  • Mueller Needs To 'Finish The Job,' Former Justice Department Official Says
    HuffPost

    Mueller Needs To 'Finish The Job,' Former Justice Department Official Says

    Time for Mueller to tell it like it is, says the former deputy attorney general.

  • The Latest: Mueller testimony delayed until July 24
    Associated Press

    The Latest: Mueller testimony delayed until July 24

    Special counsel Robert Mueller's testimony to Congress has been delayed until July 24 under an agreement that gives lawmakers more time to question him. Under the new arrangement, Mueller will testify for an extended period of time with the House Judiciary and intelligence committees.

  • Mueller testimony on Russia meddling investigation postponed
    AFP

    Mueller testimony on Russia meddling investigation postponed

    Special Counsel Robert Mueller's appearance in Congress next week to testify on the Russia election meddling investigation and allegations of obstruction by President Donald Trump has been postponed, the House Judiciary Committee announced Friday. Mueller was originally scheduled to appear before the committee on July 17. Completed in March after a more than two-year investigation into Russian election meddling in the 2016 presidential election, the Mueller report documents numerous instances of attempted collusion between Trump's campaign and Russia, but found no grounds for criminal conspiracy charges.

  • Shepard Smith Fact-Checks Trump On Mueller Report Exoneration: 'Not True.'
    HuffPost

    Shepard Smith Fact-Checks Trump On Mueller Report Exoneration: 'Not True.'

    Action could "be taken up by the Congress while the president is still in office — or by the courts after his term is complete," warned the Fox News host.

  • Robert Mueller to testify about possible obstruction by Donald Trump one week later than planned
    The Telegraph

    Robert Mueller to testify about possible obstruction by Donald Trump one week later than planned

    Former special counsel Robert Mueller will testify to Congress about possible obstruction of justice by Donald Trump one week later than originally scheduled. The decision was announced as the House Judiciary and House Intelligence Committee were deep in preparations to question Mr Mueller in what is likely to be a major political spectacle. With extended time for Mr Mueller to testify, the back-to-back hearings, now scheduled for 24 July, are expected to be a pivotal moment in the House panels' investigations into Donald Trump. The details of the agreement were announced by Jerrold Nadler and Adam Schiff, the chairmen of the two committees, after a day of protracted negotiations that consumed the capitol. Under the new arrangement, Mr Mueller will testify for three hours before the House Judiciary Committee from 8:30 am, and then before the House Intelligence Committee from noon. Mr Mueller is still appearing pursuant to a subpoena Credit: AP The former special counsel, who rose above the political fray during his investigation by not commenting on his work, is still making his appearance before lawmakers pursuant to a subpoena. "All members - Democrats and Republicans - of both committees will have a meaningful opportunity to question the Special Counsel," the Mr Nadler and Mr Schiff said in a joint statement. It was not immediately clear whether the two House committees had also been able to negotiate the reinstatement of a closed-door session for an hour with Mr Mueller and his deputies. The closed-door session had earlier been abruptly cancelled, for which Democrats blamed pressure on Mr Mueller from the Justice Department to not testify. Republicans said it was never agreed. Democrats have been seeking Mr Mueller's public testimony on Capitol Hill for months, eager to allow for him to build a case against Mr Trump over possible obstruction of justice. Unrest in the Capitol: Junior lawmakers on the Judiciary Committee could be excluded from next week’s hearing with Mueller bc lawyers agreed to appearance before 22 members for a limited time. The panel has 41 members.— Hugo Lowell (@hugolowell) 12 July 2019 The original plan for Mr Mueller's hearing was for him to testify two hours before both committees, but this format had become a point of contention for some Democrats on the Judiciary Committee. Because of five-minute questioning rules, the limited time would have meant only the more senior Democrats would have been able to question Mr Mueller, rankling junior committee members. The opposition from junior Democrats likely to be excluded from proceedings pushed Mr Nadler to renegotiate with a reluctant Mr Mueller and his team to extend his appearance in Congress. Speaking to reporters at the White House on Friday morning, Mr Trump disparaged House Democrats' push for Mr Mueller's testimony. "There's nothing Mueller can say," the president said. The Mueller report concluded there was no conspiracy between Mr Trump's campaign and Russia to influence the results of the 2016 election but did not clear the president of obstruction. Mr Mueller decided not to pursue an obstruction charge against Mr Trump in part because of Justice Department guidelines that prevent an indictment of a sitting president.

  • Special counsel Mueller's testimony delayed until July 24
    Associated Press

    Special counsel Mueller's testimony delayed until July 24

    Special counsel Robert Mueller's testimony to Congress has been delayed until July 24 under an agreement that gives lawmakers more time to question him. Mueller had been scheduled to testify July 17 before two house committees about the findings of his Russia investigation. Under the new arrangement, Mueller will testify for an extended period of time — three hours instead of two — before the House Judiciary Committee.

  • Robert Mueller's congressional testimony delayed by a week
    ABC News

    Robert Mueller's congressional testimony delayed by a week

    Former special counsel Robert Mueller's highly anticipated congressional testimony about his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election has been delayed by one week, according to a press release issued Friday evening. Mueller will now appear before the House Judiciary Committee and House Intelligence Committee on July 24 for two separate hearings. The testimony before the committees was originally scheduled for July 17, but when the Judiciary Committee asked for more time to question Mueller, he asked for more time to prepare.

  • Mueller's testimony pushed to July 24 in a deal with House lawmakers that allows more time for questioning
    Business Insider

    Mueller's testimony pushed to July 24 in a deal with House lawmakers that allows more time for questioning

    Mueller's testimony was going to be limited to two hours — and only senior House lawmakers were going to be given time for questioning.

  • Bloomberg

    Mueller's Testimony Before House Panels to Be Put Off for a Week

    (Bloomberg) -- The highly anticipated testimony of former Special Counsel Robert Mueller before two House committees will be put off for one week, the panel leaders announced on Friday night.Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler of New York and Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff of California said in a joint statement that they had reached an agreement with Mueller to appear on July 24 so that he could be questioned for an additional hour by Nadler’s panel.“This will allow the American public to gain further insight into the special counsel’s investigation and the evidence uncovered regarding Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and President Trump’s possible obstruction of justice and abuse of power,” the two Democratic congressmen said.There was no mention in the announcement of whether any of Mueller’s former deputies on the special counsel’s staff have agreed, as requested, to provide closed-door interviews.One person familiar with the matter said that former members of the staff would not testify under the agreement with Mueller, and all the questioning would unfold in public.Another person, however, said that a senior member of Mueller’s team had testified privately to the Intelligence Committee for five hours and that negotiations with the Justice Department for the possible appearance of others on the staff was continuing.Both people were granted anonymity to discuss the deliberations.The jockeying came as both parties in the House prepared for a pivotal encounter with Mueller, who was subpoenaed by the Democrats to discuss his investigation into Russian meddling in the 2020 election and possible obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump.The former special prosecutor’s testimony is the best chance that Democrats have to revive their stymied inquiries of the president.The expanded up-to-three hours questioning by the Judiciary Committee will help to resolve bipartisan complaints from the 41-member panel.Under the previously planned setup, Democrats and Republicans would have split the two hours evenly, one hour per party. That left members on both sides of the aisle complaining that more junior members would not get to ask questions under a five-minute rule.“I appreciate news the chairman has taken seriously the concerns Judiciary Republicans raised this week,” said the committee’s top Republican, Doug Collins of Georgia, in a statement. “The new format will allow all Judiciary Republicans to question the special counsel on July 24.”Representative Hakeem Jeffries, a New York Democrat and Judiciary member, said the issue had nothing to do with members wanting the spotlight -- or their egos.“Every single member of the House Democratic Caucus and the entire Judiciary Committee should be able to participate in the hearing in some way, shape or form," Jeffries added.Mueller has made clear he has no intention of saying anything beyond the 448-page report he delivered in April. In the report, he said he and his staff did not conclude that those around Trump conspired in Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential campaign but that he couldn’t exonerate Trump on allegations he sought to obstruct the Russia inquiry.Trump has ridiculed the Democrats for their planned hearings with the witness who he called the “conflicted and compromised” Mueller.“He said he was ‘done’ after his last 9 minute speech, and that he had nothing more to say outside of the No Collusion, No Obstruction, Report,” Trump tweeted on Thursday. “Enough already, go back to work!\--With assistance from Margaret Talev.To contact the reporter on this story: Billy House in Washington at bhouse5@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Kevin Whitelaw at kwhitelaw@bloomberg.net, John Harney, Larry LiebertFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Special counsel Robert Mueller's testimony postponed by one week
    The Guardian

    Special counsel Robert Mueller's testimony postponed by one week

    Testimony comes a week later than planned, under an agreement that gives lawmakers more time to question himRobert Mueller speaks on the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election in May 2019. Photograph: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty ImagesThe special counsel Robert Mueller will testify before Congress about the findings of the Russia investigation on 24 July, one week later than his appearance was originally planned, under an agreement that gives lawmakers more time to question him.Mueller had been scheduled to report on the inquiry into Russian election meddling and ties between Russia and the campaign of Donald Trump on 17 July. But lawmakers in both parties complained that the short length of the hearings would not allow enough time for all members to ask questions.Under the new arrangement, Mueller will testify for an extended period of time, three hours instead of two, before the House judiciary committee. He will then testify before the House intelligence committee in a separate hearing. The two committees said in a statement that all members of both committees will be able to question him.In the joint statement, the panels said the longer hearing “will allow the American public to gain further insight into the special counsel’s investigation and the evidence uncovered regarding Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and President Trump’s possible obstruction of justice and abuse of power”.Mueller has expressed his reluctance to testify and said he will not go beyond what is in his 448-page report. But Democrats have been determined to highlight its contents for Americans who they believe have not read it. They want to extract information from the former special counsel and spotlight what they say are his most damaging findings against Trump.Democrats are expected to ask Mueller about his conclusions, including that he could not exonerate Trump on obstruction of justice after detailing several episodes in which Trump tried to influence the investigation. Mueller also said there was not enough evidence to establish a criminal conspiracy between Trump’s presidential campaign and the Kremlin.One thing judiciary members want to focus on in questioning Mueller is whether Trump would have been charged with a crime were he not president. Mueller said at the news conference that charging a president with a crime was “not an option” because of longstanding justice department policy. But Democrats want to know more about how he made that decision and when.The committees did not say whether expected closed-door sessions with two of Mueller’s deputies, James Quarles and Aaron Zebley, would go on. Those sessions, part of an original deal struck between Congress and the deputies, appeared to be in doubt after the justice department recently pushed back on the arrangement.It is unclear whether Mueller’s testimony will give Democratic investigations new momentum. In the news conference, Mueller indicated that it was up to Congress to decide what to do with his findings. But Democrats have had little success so far in their attempts to probe his findings as the White House has blocked several witnesses from answering questions.That means the committees may have to go through a lengthy court process to get more information. About 80 Democrats have said they think an impeachment inquiry should be launched to bolster their efforts, but the House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, has so far rebuffed those calls.

  • Robert Mueller & House Panels Finalize Deal To Delay Testimony Until July 24
    Deadline

    Robert Mueller & House Panels Finalize Deal To Delay Testimony Until July 24

    Former special counsel Robert Mueller's congressional testimony, scheduled for July 17, has been delayed by a week, House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler and House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff confirmed in a joint statement. Mueller and the two House panels struck a deal Friday to reschedule his testimony for July 24, as part of an agreement […]

  • Robert Mueller's public testimony delayed one week to July 24
    USA TODAY

    Robert Mueller's public testimony delayed one week to July 24

    The planned testimony in separate sessions before two House committees was delayed one week to allow more time for both panels to question Robert Mueller.

  • William Barr ordered an investigation into how the CIA concluded Russia wanted to help Trump in 2016 — but that investigation was already done 2 years ago
    Business Insider

    William Barr ordered an investigation into how the CIA concluded Russia wanted to help Trump in 2016 — but that investigation was already done 2 years ago

    Attorney General William Barr opened an investigation into the CIA that's already been done by Mike Pompeo, a former agency director.