Supreme Court

The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS) is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States. Established pursuant to Article III of the U.S. Constitution in 1789, it has original jurisdiction over a small range of cases, such as suits between two or more states, and those involving ambassadors.
Get the latest news and discussion about the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • Judge orders Trump administration to remove 2020 census citizenship question
    www.mprnews.org

    Judge orders Trump administration to remove 2020 census citizenship question

    A federal judge in New York has ruled against the Trump administration's decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman ordered the administration to stop its plans to include the controversial question on forms for the upcoming national head count "without curing the legal defects" the judge identified in his opinion released on Tuesday. Furman's decision marks a significant milestone in a legal battle that began shortly after the Trump administration announced last year that the 2020 census would include a controversial question about U.S. citizenship status. The added question was: "Is this person a citizen of the United States?" All U.S. households

  • https://www.oneindia.com

    Justice Dinesh Maheshwari, Sanjiv Khanna sworn in as SC judges

    New Delhi, Jan 18: Justices Dinesh Maheshwari and Sanjiv Khanna were sworn-in as Supreme Court judges on Friday. Chief Justice of India (CJI) Ranjan Gogoi administered the oath of office to justices Maheshwari and Khanna during the swearing-in ceremony held in court number 1 of the Supreme Court. The sanctioned strength of judges in the Supreme Court is 31. With the swearing-in of justices Maheshwari and Khanna, the strength has now gone up to 28. While Justice Maheshwari was the chief justice of the Karnataka High Court, Justice Khanna was a judge in the Delhi High Court. The government had on Wednesday notified the appointment of justices Maheshwari and Khanna as judges of the Supreme Court.

  • Trump appears at March for Life via video, while Pence attends in person
    feeds.cbsnews.com

    Trump appears at March for Life via video, while Pence attends in person

    President Trump promised protesters demonstrating against abortion rights that he will veto any bill that "weakens the protection of human life." Mr. Trump spoke via video Friday to participants in this year's March for Life on the National Mall. The first march took place on the west steps of the Capitol in January 1974, the year after the Supreme Court decided Roe v. Wade. Thousands braved the cold to attend Friday's event. Mr. Trump and Vice President Mike Pence, who attended the event, listed actions the administration has taken over the past two years to deter abortions. Pence and his wife, Karen, were surprise attendees. When they took the stage, Pence announced: "We're the Pences, and

  • Supreme Court orders 24/7 security for Sabari duo
    The Telegraph

    Supreme Court orders 24/7 security for Sabari duo

    The Supreme Court on Friday directed the Kerala government to provide round-the-clock security to the two women who entered the Sabarimala temple on January 2. A bench of Chief Justice Ranjan Gogoi and Justices L. Nageswara Rao and Dinesh Maheshwari passed the directions on a plea filed by senior advocate Indira Jaising on behalf of the two women — Bindu and Kanakadurga. According to the petition, the two women, both of childbearing age, have been receiving threats since they entered the hill shrine to Lord Ayyappan. Kanakadurga had to be hospitalised after being allegedly beaten up by her mother-in-law on returning from the Sabarimala pilgrimage. “Give them full protection. You (the Kerala government)

  • Supreme Court inaction suggests DACA safe for another year
    WTTE

    Supreme Court inaction suggests DACA safe for another year

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama-era program that shields young immigrants from deportation and that President Donald Trump has sought to end seems likely to survive for at least another year. That's because the Supreme Court took no action Friday on the Trump administration's request to decide by early summer whether Trump's bid to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was legal. The program has been protected by several federal courts. Based on the high court's usual practices, the earliest the justices would hear arguments in the case would be this fall, if they decide to hear the case at all. If arguments take place in October, a decision would not be likely before 2020, when

  • Chino Valley Unified will not take prayer case to U.S. Supreme Court
    Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

    Chino Valley Unified will not take prayer case to U.S. Supreme Court

    Chino Valley Unified School District's years-long legal battle over prayer during school board meetings is over. This week, the school board voted against asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review a lower court's finding that its former practice of prayer during meetings was unconstitutional, and stopped all work on the case. “I hope it's not lost on anyone that the Freedom From Religion Foundation lawsuit has been divisive,” board member Christina Gagnier said at the close of the meeting Thursday, Jan. 17. “It's my hope we can move past an era of divisiveness.” The board voted 3-2 in closed session Thursday to drop the case; the decision was later announced in public session. A U.S. District Court

  • Unconfirmed report says daughters of Pakistani woman who avoided death sentence for blasphemy are in Canada
    canada.com

    Unconfirmed report says daughters of Pakistani woman who avoided death sentence for blasphemy are in Canada

    The daughters of a Pakistani Christian woman who narrowly avoided a death sentence for blasphemy have been given asylum in Canada, says an international media report, but the government won't say if the report is true. Asia Bibi, who was acquitted in October by the Pakistani Supreme Court, remains in protective custody in Pakistan — an appeal of her case is pending — and continues to be the subject of violent protests and threats against her life. At the end of November, Bibi's brother-in-law Joseph Nadeem said people had been shooting at the house where he and Bibi's two daughters were living and that the family faces “constant threats.” Nadeem said he hoped that his family and Bibi's daughter would be out of the country by Christmas, according to a report on the Aid to the Church in Need website.

  • French Farmers Scoff in California’s General Direction for Its Ban on Foie Gras
    Robb Report

    French Farmers Scoff in California’s General Direction for Its Ban on Foie Gras

    The fallout begins. Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to take up the case to overturn California's foie gras ban. The justices' move ended years of legal wrangling in the Golden State, finally forcing restaurants to remove the fatty duck liver from their menus. The ruling is rippling around the world. And California's ban […]

  • The Delaware Bankruptcy Court Grapples With Section 546(e) Post-Merit Management
    The National Law Review

    The Delaware Bankruptcy Court Grapples With Section 546(e) Post-Merit Management

    In its ruling in FTI Consulting, Inc. v. Sweeney (In re Centaur, LLC), the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware addressed the Supreme Court's recent clarification of the scope of Bankruptcy Code Section 546(e)'s “safe harbor” provision, affirming a more narrow interpretation of Section 546(e). Section 546(e) limits a bankruptcy trustee's power to avoid transfers made by, to, or for the benefit of certain entities, including financial institutions.  A split of authority arose in the lower courts concerning the scope of Section 546(e).  A number of courts, including the Third Circuit, took an expansive view that the safe harbor applies to transfers involving financial institutions

  • Bolsonaros face questions in Brazil over corruption probe
    Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune

    Bolsonaros face questions in Brazil over corruption probe

    RIO DE JANEIRO — Allies and supporters of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro are questioning his commitment to fighting corruption as questions mount about irregular payments in his inner circle just weeks into his presidency. Bolsonaro's son, Flavio Bolsonaro, has come under fire over suspicious payments to his former driver flagged by the Council for Financial Activities Control, the country's financial regulatory body. The Bolsonaros and the driver deny wrongdoing over $320,000 that changed hands from 2016-2017 and came to light late last year. The controversy deepened Thursday when a Supreme Court justice, Luiz Fux, ordered a Rio de Janeiro state court to temporarily suspend the probe. Flavio

  • The Chattanoogan

    State Supreme Court Holds That Evidence Cannot Be Used To Contradict Written Words In Contract

    In a case closely watched by Tennessee's business community, the Tennessee Supreme Court has held that trial courts cannot use evidence outside of the written agreement—called “extrinsic” evidence—to interpret a contract if that evidence is used to contradict the contract's written terms. Beginning in 1999, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee, Inc., signed agency agreements with insurance agency Individual HealthCare Specialists, Inc., to allow Individual HealthCare to solicit applications for BlueCross insurance policies.  Their business relationship lasted over ten years, with new contracts each year that spelled out the commission rates for sales of new insurance policies and renewals of existing

  • Court Voids New York’s Opioid Surcharge Law
    ALM Media

    Court Voids New York’s Opioid Surcharge Law

    In his Health Law column, Francis J. Serbaroli discusses a recent federal court decision finding New York’s statutory surcharges on opioid manufacturers and distributors unconstitutional under the Dormant Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution. The court determined that the surcharge was not a tax but a regulatory penalty, and that the law’s prohibition on passing-through the surcharges to pharmacies and end users of opioids improperly discriminated against out-of-state opioid customers and favored in-state users.

  • Trump Watch: The Latest Cohen Bombshell | What to Watch on the Census
    ALM Media

    Trump Watch: The Latest Cohen Bombshell | What to Watch on the Census

    Yet another congressional inquiry could loom for the president after Michael Cohen's latest claims.

  • Army must give right work environment to women, says Supreme Court
    https://www.hindustantimes.com/

    Army must give right work environment to women, says Supreme Court

    The army should provide a conducive work environment for its women officers, the Supreme Court said on Friday, as it asked the defence ministry to consider a representation by a 39-year-old female lieutenant colonel against her assignment at a place that does not have a crèche. A bench led by Justice DY Chandrachud was hearing Lt Annu Colonel Dogra's petition questioning her temporary posting that requires her to travel from Jodhpur to Nagpur to conduct court martial proceedings against an officer. The proceedings in Kamptee (Nagpur) deprive her of the fundamental right of tending to her infant child, she has stated in her petition. Dogra's husband is also an army officer and is deputy judge advocate general (JAG) in Jodhpur.

  • No cash or trial delay: Judge denies requests from couple charged in son's death
    The Canadian Press

    No cash or trial delay: Judge denies requests from couple charged in son's death

    CALGARY — A judge on Friday refused requests from an Alberta couple charged in the meningitis death of their son to have their legal fees covered and a retrial delayed. David and Collet Stephan wanted $4 million to pay for past and future legal bills. "You don't have any resources. That's what you're telling me and you're not getting any here," Justice John Rooke told David Stephan, who was acting on behalf of himself and his wife in a Calgary courtroom. "The application is dismissed and ... I am not making any findings on the merits," Rooke said. In 2016, the Stephans were found guilty for failing to provide the necessaries of life to their 19-month-old son Ezekiel. The conviction was overturned by the Supreme Court of Canada and a new trial is scheduled for June. The couple's application for cash asked that they be granted $1 million to cover their past legal expenses and that another $3 million be placed in trust for any future defence fees. The Stephans say they have liquidated their assets, are in debt to their previous lawyer and don't have enough money to obtain the necessary assistance to receive a fair trial. Rooke said the Stephans would be better off taking their request for legal fees to a civil court. "You're in the wrong procedure and the wrong place. That's civil court. Another judge ... another day," Rooke said. "It's clear to me if you want to pursue those matters you can sue the attorney general, you can sue the hospital, you can sue the ambulance and you can sue everybody except the judge." Stephan has alleged collusion between the Crown and police in the first trial and has also accused some witnesses of perjuring themselves. He said outside court he and his wife wanted a delay as well as the cash for lawyers to guarantee a fair trial. "We were hoping for a stay of proceedings until we got legal representation. It's kind of bittersweet. It would sure be nice to have this case turfed like it should be," Stephan said. "As heart-wrenching as it's going to be for myself and my wife, it would sure be nice to have the truth come out." Rooke noted that the Stephans had not filed an application for legal aid. "You don't have to justify why you're not applying for it. Some people may say you're a fool for not doing it, but that's your business. You have the right to represent yourself," the justice said. Stephan said one or even two lawyers appointed by legal aid wouldn't be sufficient. He said civil action isn't possible now either. "If we had the money we would have already been before the civil courts to have all of these facts tried," he said. At this point, he said, they might have to continue to represent themselves. The original trial in Lethbridge, Alta., heard evidence that the couple treated the boy with natural remedies and smoothies made of garlic, onion and horseradish rather than take him to a doctor. He had been ill for several days and at one point became so stiff he couldn't sit in his car seat. Once the boy stopped breathing, the Stephans called 911 but he died in hospital in Calgary in 2012. The Stephans now live in Grande Prairie, Alta. — Follow @BillGraveland on Twitter Bill Graveland, The Canadian Press Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version said Justice Beth Hughes was presiding.