Supreme Court

The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States. Established pursuant to Article III of the U.S. Constitution in 1789, it has original jurisdiction over a narrow range of cases, including suits between two or more states and those involving ambassadors. It also has ultimate appellate jurisdiction over all federal court and state court cases that involve a point of federal constitutional or statutory law.
Get the latest news and discussion about the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • Stephen L. Carter: Five opinions that show Justice Stevens's greatness
    TwinCities.com

    Stephen L. Carter: Five opinions that show Justice Stevens's greatness

    Given this strongly held view, I thought I might commemorate the career of the great justice, who died Tuesday at the age of 99, by briefly discussing five of his majority opinions. In 2002, in Watchtower Bible and Tract Society v. Village of Stratton, the justices ruled that an ordinance requiring a permit prior to any door-to-door solicitation violated the First Amendment. Stevens's opinion for the majority fascinates, not for the result, which was surely a foregone conclusion, but for a key part of the rationale: the right to advocate and solicit anonymously. To be forced to apply for a permit before going door-to-door, Stevens wrote, “necessarily results in a surrender of that anonymity.” In our own era of doxxing, social media bans and deplatforming, Stevens's words should resonate.

  • Do protections for people with disabilities apply online? Domino's asks high court.
    The Seattle Times

    Do protections for people with disabilities apply online? Domino's asks high court.

    Now Domino's, backed by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the nation's largest retailers, wants the Supreme Court to step in to decide whether the Americans With Disabilities Act, which has transformed America's physical landscape, applies equally to the internet. The ADA “says nothing about the accessibility of websites or applications on smartphones, whether standing alone or in connection with restaurants, stores, or any other brick-and-mortar establishments that qualify as public accommodations,” wrote Washington lawyer Lisa S. Blatt, who represents Domino's. Lower courts have said the statute does apply, although they have disagreed about exactly when and to whom. As a result, the number of lawsuits has exploded: 2,250 federal suits asserting ADA violations based on website inaccessibility were filed in 2018, nearly triple the number from the year before, according to the Domino's brief.

  • Retired Justice John Paul Stevens, A Maverick On The Bench, Dies At 99
    www.ksmu.org

    Retired Justice John Paul Stevens, A Maverick On The Bench, Dies At 99

    Retired Justice John Paul Stevens, whose Supreme Court opinions transformed many areas of American law during his 34 year tenure, died at the age of 99 in in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., of complications following a stroke he suffered Monday. Chief Justice John Roberts confirmed Stevens' death in a statement from the Supreme Court. "A son of the Midwest heartland and a veteran of World War II, Justice Stevens devoted his long life to public service, including 35 years on the Supreme Court," Roberts said in the statement. "He brought to our bench an inimitable blend of kindness, humility, wisdom, and independence. His unrelenting commitment to justice has left us a better nation. We extend our deepest

  • The Associated Press

    Ex-Rays prospect moves from kangaroo court to Supreme Court

    Having experienced the culture of kangaroo court, Matt Rice is headed to the U.S. Supreme Court. The former Tampa Bay outfield prospect was among the clerks hired by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas for the 2019-20 term. Now 30, Rice was born in Johnson City, Tennessee, and went to Science Hill High in Science Hill, Kentucky.

  • Supreme Court Casts a Wide Net with Rule 10b-5
    The National Law Review

    Supreme Court Casts a Wide Net with Rule 10b-5

    The U.S. Supreme Court recently held that someone doesn't need to have “made” a false or misleading statement to have primary liability under the securities fraud rules. Although the outer limits of that liability are not yet defined, this decision should cause persons with ancillary roles in securities transactions to be even more attentive to the accuracy of disclosures. Affected people could include: Broker-dealer firms whose representatives provide customers with disclosures about mutual funds and securities-based insurance products sold through the firm; and In some circumstances, legal, accounting, or business personnel who prepare, but do not have ultimate authority over, those disclosures.

  • Karnataka crisis: Bench rises, ball back in Speaker's court as no show in SC today
    https://www.oneindia.com

    Karnataka crisis: Bench rises, ball back in Speaker's court as no show in SC today

    New Delhi, July 19: The ball is now in the Speaker's court as the Supreme Court has not taken up the plea filed by both the Congress and JD(S) relating to the crisis in Karnataka. The Bench headed by the Chief Justice of India, Ranjan Gogoi has risen and the matter has not been taken up. This means that the ball is in the court of the Speaker, who can chose to ignore the deadline issued by the Governor. The Governor who had told the H D Kumaraswamy led government to prove its majority by 1.30 pm today has fixed another deadline of 6 pm for today. In case, the government does not adhere to this deadline, the BJP is likely to petition the Supreme Court about the same. The BJP will tell the court

  • Our Turn: New approach needed for N.H. judicial nominations
    Concord Monitor

    Our Turn: New approach needed for N.H. judicial nominations

    Ten years ago today, following the retirement of New Hampshire's David Souter from the U.S. Supreme Court, the Senate began deliberating the historic nomination of Justice Sonia Sotomayor to take his place. Sotomayor was not your typical Supreme Court nominee. Indeed, while President Barack Obama began his selection process by laying out a familiar set of qualifications – “a sharp and independent mind and a record of excellence and integrity” as well as dedication “to the rule of law (and) the appropriate limits of the judicial role” – he did not leave it there. Enter the contentious “e” word, empathy, that would cause more than a passing spell of heartburn to the 30 white male Republican senators who ultimately voted against Sotomayor's nomination.

  • The Week

    How far is students' free speech protected?

    As any conservative columnist, billionaire Redditor, or smart-alec 7th grader getting sent out of social studies class knows, it's easy enough to cry "First Amendment foul!" any time a governmental actor puts a limit on someone's communications. Over the last century, the Supreme Court has made plain that there are numerous exceptions to free speech — though the courts' logic on when they apply is complicated, perhaps even inconsistent. As the school year came to a close recently, public high schools in Illinois and North Carolina curtailed a kind of student speech in similar ways: by recalling and reprinting yearbooks that included photos the administration determined could be seen as racist or hateful. This season's yearbook for Oak Park and River Forest High School near Chicago contained 18 photos of students making the "OK" sign with thumb and index finger touching — a symbol that has come to be associated with white nationalism during the Trump era.

  • State Office: O'Connor house going on U.S. historic register
    KSAZ

    State Office: O'Connor house going on U.S. historic register

    Former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's 1950s adobe home in metro Phoenix is being listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The State Historic Preservation Office's announcement Friday says the National Park Service approved Arizona's nomination of the Sandra Day O'Connor House for placement on the register, which the office described as the nation's list of properties considered worthy of preservation. The home was originally in Paradise Valley but was relocated in 2009 to a Tempe park for use by the Sandra Day O'Connor Institute.

  • The Economic Times

    NRC: An exercise in focus

    The exercise to finalise the National Register of Citizens (NRC) in Assam is under tremendous focus as it is aimed at identifying illegal immigrants for their deportation. The exercise is being carried out under the supervision of the Supreme Court which had sought publication of the final list by July 31. However, the government has sought more time to carry out the process with extra care so that no genuine Indian citizen is excluded and no illegal immigrant is included in it. The NRC was first prepared after the 1951 Census of India and is now being updated in Assam to include the names of those persons (or their descendants) that appear in the NRC, 1951, or in electoral rolls up to the midnight

  • The Economic Times

    Kumaraswamy moves Supreme Court against Governor's direction

    NEW DELHI: Karnataka chief minister HD Kumaraswamy on Friday moved the Supreme Court, saying governor VR Vala “cannot dictate to the House the manner in which the debate of the confidence motion has to be taken up” when the House was in session. He also sought a clarification from the top court on its order exempting the rebel Congress MLAs from attending the assembly proceedings. An application filed by the CM as the president of the Janata Dal (Secular) sought a clarification from the court on its July 17, 2019, order on the ground that the party's constitutional rights under the Tenth Schedule were “vitally affected.” In that order, the court had left the 15 rebels free to not take part in

  • Funeral service held for 86 Muslims killed by Serbs
    The Sacramento Bee

    Funeral service held for 86 Muslims killed by Serbs

    Funeral service held for 86 Muslims killed by Serbs Several thousand people attended a funeral service in Bosnia on Saturday for 86 Muslims who were slain by Serbs in one of the worst atrocities of the country's 1992-95 war. Relatives of the victims, religious leaders and others gathered at a soccer stadium near the eastern town of Prijedor, standing solemnly behind lines of coffins draped with green cloths. The victims ranged in age from 19 to 61. They were among some 200 Bosnian Muslims and Croats from Prijedor who were massacred in August 1992 on a cliff on Mt. Vlasic known as Koricanske Stijene. The victims were shot and killed by the edge of the cliff, their bodies falling into the abyss.

  • Dialogue over revenue row, CJ asks governors and MPs
    The Standard

    Dialogue over revenue row, CJ asks governors and MPs

    Paul Ogemba 20th Jul 2019 00:00:00 GMT +0300 Chief Justice David Maraga has told governors to seek mediation with the Senate and National Assembly to unlock the stalemate over revenue allocation to counties. Justice Maraga said although the Supreme Court is ready and prepared to determine the dispute, which has led to near paralysis in some counties, the court will be happy if they can reach an agreement to save the time it will take handling the case. “I believe the people involved can talk and resolve the issues before we settle down to hearing the application for advisory opinion filed by the governors. That will save us time and allow us to move forward,” he said. The CJ made the remarks

  • DC Circuit Affirms Ban on Guns at US Capitol
    www.courthousenews.com

    DC Circuit Affirms Ban on Guns at US Capitol

    WASHINGTON (CN) – A year and a half after his victory at the Supreme Court, the D.C. Circuit on Friday rejected an argument from a self-proclaimed “constitutional bounty hunter” that his 2014 guilty plea should be invalidated because a ban on guns on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol is a violation of the Second Amendment. On May 30, 2013, Rodney Class parked his Jeep in a secured parking lot near the U.S. Capitol, leaving behind a cache of guns and knives as he went to the nearby House and Senate office buildings in hopes of meeting with lawmakers. Class described himself to FBI agents as a “private attorney general” who travels the country enforcing laws against judges he thinks are ignoring

  • Trump To Nominate Eugene Scalia, Late Supreme Court Justice's Son, As Labor Secretary
    www.wamc.org

    Trump To Nominate Eugene Scalia, Late Supreme Court Justice's Son, As Labor Secretary

    President Trump will nominate Eugene Scalia, son of late Justice Antonin Scalia, to be the next labor secretary, the president announced via Twitter Thursday evening. A source close to Scalia earlier Thursday confirmed to NPR that the president had offered Scalia the job and that he accepted. Scalia, 55, is a partner at the law firm Gibson Dunn & Crutcher in Washington, D.C., where he handles cases related to labor and employment. In the early 1990s, Scalia served as a special assistant to Attorney General William Barr during Barr's first stint leading the Justice Department. Scalia also served as the solicitor of the U.S. Labor Department, the agency's top lawyer, during the George W. Bush administration.