Technology

MIT Technology Review is a magazine wholly owned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, but editorially independent of the university. It was founded in 1899 as The Technology Review, and was re-launched without "The" in its name on April 23, 1998 under then publisher R. Bruce Journey. In September 2005, it underwent another transition under its then editor-in-chief and publisher, Jason Pontin, to a form resembling the historical magazine.
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  • How to outsmart smartphone scammers
    The MetroWest Daily News

    How to outsmart smartphone scammers

    Your smartphone is your confidante, your hand-held connection to the world — and one of your biggest vulnerabilities. Scammers can take advantage of day-to-day tasks that seem innocuous, like checking a bank balance or charging a phone at a public USB port, to exploit personal information for their profit. To keep that data safe, start by understanding the threats you face. Your phone has three main areas of vulnerability: its hardware, its software and your phone number. Each carries a risk, and there are steps you can take to mitigate them. HARDWARE VULNERABILITY A four-digit passcode alone isn't enough to secure your phone's hardware from intruders. One weakness comes from the charging port.

  • Big name businesses switch tech suppliers
    Australian Financial Review

    Big name businesses switch tech suppliers

    "Especially in financials, CFOs don't wake up in the morning saying, 'what I want to do today is replace my general ledger,' but they are finding that existing systems aren't letting them do the things with machine learning, better reporting and so on that newer competitors are benefiting from," Mr Clarke said. Oracle and SAP would hotly dispute Workday's claims that they are the best choice for HR and financial software in the cloud era, and have spent the last few years looking to reposition themselves in the minds of customers as cloud players. Newer companies like Workday had an advantage because they had a suite of cloud native products, whereas the likes of SAP and Oracle had to waste effort maintaining and developing older technology products. Workday's more established rivals were playing catch-up by acquiring cloud-based software companies and hoping to cobble them together.

  • CNET

    Best vlogging cameras and accessories for YouTube

    You can use any camera you want to shoot video for YouTube. But, if your digital camera spits out clips that make you like a yellowish ill-defined, mushy mass of pixels, you're going to have trouble getting and keeping viewers. Why not start with a good quality camera then, right? Right.  Since any "good" camera will work, though, you'll probably want to start by deciding what type of shooting you want to do. There's little reason to spend hundreds or thousands on high-end cameras if you can accomplish what you want with a webcam or your phone. To that end, we picked out some of the best cameras that can be used for everything from simple live streams from your laptop to more polished vlog productions.

  • The 5G Network Is Taking Shape And The Latest Entrant Looks Dazzling
    Forbes

    The 5G Network Is Taking Shape And The Latest Entrant Looks Dazzling

    The age of 5G connectivity is upon us, with its super-fast speeds, improved capacity and super-low latency. In the U.K., two of the four mobile networks have already gone live and, in the next few hours, the third joins the party with an offering that is arguably the most important yet. The U.K.'s biggest network, EE, launched its 5G service in May 2019, with Vodafone following soon after. Now, Three, until now seen as a challenger brand, has launched its unique 5G offering, and it's different and powerful enough to blow competitors out of the water. It's a formula that will be watched closely by other network providers around the world. Here's everything you need to know. Who is Three, exactly?

  • Miami Herald

    Initiatives discussed to improve rural broadband

    Initiatives discussed to improve rural broadband Officials in Virginia are discussing ways to improve reliable internet service in rural areas. The Daily Progress reports that U.S. Rep. Abigail Spanberger hosted a Rural Broadband Summit on Saturday at Louisa County High School in Mineral, Virginia, to discuss initiatives to bring internet access to rural communities. The Federal Communications Commission sets the benchmark for internet reliability at 25 megabytes per second for downloads and 3 megabytes per second for uploads. Statewide, 97 percent of urban areas have access to internet speeds that meet the federal benchmarks, compared to 71 percent in rural areas.

  • ETF Trends

    Sector ETF Plays During an Inverted Yield Curve

    As a closely segment of the yield curve inverts, signaling a potential recession ahead, investors may want to look to energy and technology sector ETFs in the mean time. Bank of America Strategist Mary ...

  • Hackers can work out your online passwords just from the sound of your keystrokes, study finds
    The Telegraph

    Hackers can work out your online passwords just from the sound of your keystrokes, study finds

    Hackers are able to work out your online passwords just from the sound of your keystrokes, a new study has revealed.

  • Privacy questions arise as humans review user audio at Facebook
    Denver Post

    Privacy questions arise as humans review user audio at Facebook

    NEW YORK — Facebook has paid contractors to transcribe audio clips from users of its Messenger service, raising privacy concerns for a company with a history of privacy lapses. The practice was, until recently, common in the tech industry. Companies say the use of humans helps improve their services. But users aren't typically aware that humans and not just computers are reviewing audio. Transcriptions done by humans raise bigger concerns because of the potential of rogue employees or contractors leaking details. The practice at Google emerged after some of its Dutch language audio snippets were leaked. More than 1,000 recordings were obtained by Belgian broadcaster VRT NWS, which noted that

  • Grandma feeling lonely? A friendly robot may be the answer
    Rolla Daily News

    Grandma feeling lonely? A friendly robot may be the answer

    The city of Saijo in Ehime Prefecture faces the Seto Inland Sea to the north and Mt. Ishizuchi, the tallest mountain in western Japan, to the south. Here, 87-year-old Setsuko Saeki has lived with a robot for a year in her spacious house at the foot of a mountain. The city of Saijo in Ehime Prefecture faces the Seto Inland Sea to the north and Mt. Ishizuchi, the tallest mountain in western Japan, to the south. Here, 87-year-old Setsuko Saeki has lived with a robot for a year in her spacious house at the foot of a mountain. When she gets out of bed in the morning and enters the living room, she's greeted by her robot, a model named "PaPeRo i," on a desk. "Good morning, Setsuko-san," is a typical

  • Huawei's US Chief Security Officer says he's been called a traitor for defending the Chinese tech giant. But he says his goal is to 'promote a safer cyberspace'
    Tech News Tube

    Huawei's US Chief Security Officer says he's been called a traitor for defending the Chinese tech giant. But he says his goal is to 'promote a safer cyberspace'

    Andy Purdy, Huawei's US chief security officer, once served with the Homeland Security Department where he helped launch the National Cyber Security Division. He says he's been called a traitor for his role at the Chinese tech giant, even though he maintains that his goal is to "promote a safer…

  • Nintendo Switch Exchange Program Rumors for New Model Debunked
    Digital Trends

    Nintendo Switch Exchange Program Rumors for New Model Debunked

    A spokesperson for Nintendo debunked rumors that some new Nintendo Switch owners will be able to exchange their consoles to the upgraded version for free. Nintendo representatives said earlier this week that customers who purchased a Nintendo Switch after July 17, which was when the updated console was announced, will be able to exchange the device for the newer model. Digital Trends confirmed the offer by calling Nintendo customer service, though the representative was not able to provide specific details for the program. However, Nintendo is now singing a different tune. A spokesperson for the company has reportedly told The Verge that the reports of an upgrade program are untrue. “We do not

  • ETF Trends

    Technology ETFs Can Still Thrive in a Recession

    While healthcare and consumer staples are the go-to sectors in a recession, technology can still thrive even in a market downturn. As such, investors might want to consider taking a closer look at technology exchange-traded funds (ETFs) as a value-infused option. Technology Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLK) : The Technology Select Sector SPDR Fund tries to reflect the performance of the Technology Select Sector Index, which is comprised of technology and telecom sector of the S&P 500.

  • Nokia 7.2 images leaked ahead of IFA 2019 launch
    Hindustan Times

    Nokia 7.2 images leaked ahead of IFA 2019 launch

    Images of Nokia 7.2 -- the upcoming smartphone from HMD Global -- have been leaked and they suggest the device may feature a circular camera module at the back, the media has reported. Finnish company HMD Global has already announced it will reveal new phones on September 5, just one day before IFA 2019 kicks off. At least three new smartphones are expected to be introduced early next month -- Nokia 5.2, Nokia 6.2 and Nokia 7.2, which will most likely go on sale a few weeks later, PhoneArena reported on Saturday. The case spotted online also highlight the smartphone's thin line and the circular camera that accommodates three sensors and a LED flash. The leaked images show a fingerprint sensor

  • Why Apple doesn't want users to replace their own batteries
    CNBC.com

    Why Apple doesn't want users to replace their own batteries

    The two recent incidents involving Apple products show a growing risk to the company's brand: the lithium-ion batteries that power its devices. First, the Federal Aviation Administration disclosed last week that some Apple laptops have been banned from flights. This comes after Apple recalled some 15-inch MacBook Pro laptop models because the batteries inside the computers pose a fire hazard. The official recall put into motion a regulatory apparatus designed to prevent a rogue gadget from bursting into flames on a flight. The bottom line is that if any battery from any company is recalled, it "must not" be carried aboard — or checked in luggage — on an aircraft until it's been repaired by the