U.S. immigration

Immigration to the United States is the international movement of individuals who are not natives or do not possess citizenship in order to settle, reside, study or to take-up employment in the country. It has been a major source of population growth and cultural change throughout much of the history of the United States. In absolute numbers, the United States has a larger immigrant population than any other country, with 47 million immigrants as of 2015.
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  • As More Migrants Are Denied Asylum, An Abuse Survivor Is Turned Away
    www.kcur.org

    As More Migrants Are Denied Asylum, An Abuse Survivor Is Turned Away

    When the young woman from Nicaragua got off the plane in South Florida, she hadn't seen her parents since they left their tiny Central American town to find work in the U.S. more than a decade ago. "When I saw them, I ran to hug them," she said through an interpreter, her eyes lighting up as she described their reunion at the airport. "I felt a huge joy when I saw them again, and I knew that I was going to be here, protected," she said. We're not using the woman's name because her parents are undocumented, and she's asking for asylum and hopes to stay in the U.S. She fled Nicaragua with her infant son to get away from the boy's abusive father. Finally, in Florida, she felt like she had escaped

  • A can of tuna costs three times an immigrant's daily salary at a California ICE lockup
    The Week

    A can of tuna costs three times an immigrant's daily salary at a California ICE lockup

    Immigrant detainees have to use three days worth of wages to purchase tuna or a miniature deodorant at a California immigrant detention center, Reuters reports. Daily wages may be as little as a few cents an hour at the Adelanto Detention Facility in California, and a can of commissary tuna costs $3.25 — more than four times the price at a nearby Target, per Reuters. Immigration activists say facilities like Adelanto intentionally limit access to essentials like toothpaste and even food in an effort to force or coerce inmates into cheap labor. The paltry wages are then redirected back into commissaries where detainees buy ramen noodles and soap. A spokesman for the Geo Group, which owns the Adelanto

  • Border Patrol arrests 376 migrants who dug under barrier in Arizona
    Baltimore Sun

    Border Patrol arrests 376 migrants who dug under barrier in Arizona

    A group of 376 Central Americans was arrested in southwest Arizona, the vast majority of them families who dug short, shallow holes under a barrier to cross the border, authorities said Friday. The group dug under a steel barrier in seven spots about 10 miles east of a border crossing in San Luis and made no effort to elude immigration agents. The area became a major corridor for illegal crossings in the mid-2000s, prompting the federal government to weld steel plates to a barrier made of steel bollards that had been designed to stop people in vehicles, not on foot, Border Patrol spokesman Jose Garibay III said. The group used multiple holes in an apparent effort to get everyone across the border quickly, Garibay said.

  • Democrats propose legal status for undocumented immigrant farmworkers
    The San Francisco Examiner

    Democrats propose legal status for undocumented immigrant farmworkers

    WASHINGTON — Two California Democrats filed legislation Thursday that would give undocumented immigrant farmworkers and their families a path to legal resident status and possibly U.S. citizenship. The legislation by Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Zoe Lofgren is designed to ease agricultural worker shortages and protect undocumented workers already in the United States from deportation. The bills come as the nation grapples with an extended partial government shutdown fueled by an impasse between President Donald Trump and congressional Democrats over funding for a border wall and broader differences over immigration policies. The companion Senate and House bills revive proposals by Feinstein

  • Another migrant group smuggled to New Mexico
    Elko Daily Free Press

    Another migrant group smuggled to New Mexico

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  • Government shutdown traps Cincinnati area men in growing immigration court delays
    USA Today

    Government shutdown traps Cincinnati area men in growing immigration court delays

    Attorneys are fighting to prevent the deportation of a father of five back to Mauritania. He has lived in the United States since 1991. A partial government shutdown about immigration is messing up the nation's immigration courts even more. The effects of limited dockets reach into the lives of people who need to renew a work permit or driver's license or are seeking asylum. For Salvador Ruiz, 30, a permanent U.S. resident who lives in Colerain Township, the shutdown has prevented him from moving on from a bureaucratic entanglement. He is unable to get a new license or travel to his native Mexico to visit his ailing grandmother. His case dates to 2010 when Ruiz was charged with possession of

  • Morocco foils 89,000 illegal migration attempts in 2018- interior ministry
    news.trust.org

    Morocco foils 89,000 illegal migration attempts in 2018- interior ministry

    Morocco has become a major gateway for migrants into Europe since Italy's tougher line and EU aid to the Libyan coastguard curbed the number of people coming from Libya MARRAKECH, Jan 17 (Reuters) - Morocco stopped 89,000 people from illegally migrating in 2018, up 37 percent compared to a year earlier, the interior ministry said on Thursday, as the country became the main launchpad in the Mediterranean for Europe-bound migrants. Morocco, which other Africans can visit without visas, has become a major gateway for migrants into Europe since Italy's tougher line and EU aid to the Libyan coastguard curbed the number of people coming from Libya. In 2018, Moroccan authorities dismantled 229 migrant

  • For Many Undocumented Women, Reproductive Healthcare Limited
    NBC Bay Area

    For Many Undocumented Women, Reproductive Healthcare Limited

    Days after an immigration judge denied Layidua Salazar's petition to remain in the United States in 2015 because she was not living with her spouse, she learned at an annual visit to Planned Parenthood that she was pregnant. The possibility that she would not be allowed to stay in the country made her realize "within five minutes" that she couldn't continue her pregnancy and risk her family being separated at some point, she said. "I can't do both. Can't be in the middle of deportation proceedings and be pregnant," said Salazar, who is now a storyteller with We Testify, a program of the National Network of Abortion Funds. The organization works to decrease barriers, including financial, to abortion.

  • ICE's reckless Charlotte arrests
    The Charlotte Observer

    ICE's reckless Charlotte arrests

    Two years ago in Denver, four women dropped their domestic abuse cases for fear that appearing in court could make them vulnerable to deportation. In Houston, also in 2017, the number of Hispanics reporting rapes declined by 43 percent. In Los Angeles, the police department announced a similar drop of 25 percent. Maybe you know of that disturbing pattern. Maybe you don't. But do you know who is aware? Officials at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, which made at least two arrests of suspected undocumented immigrants Wednesday inside the Mecklenburg County Courthouse. The Charlotte arrests are part of a spike of such activity in the past two years, with Department of Homeland Security agents

  • Gillibrand touted work to hasten 'removal of illegal aliens' in 2008 mailer: report
    The Hill

    Gillibrand touted work to hasten 'removal of illegal aliens' in 2008 mailer: report

    Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandGroup aiming to draft Beto O'Rourke unveils first 2020 video The Hill's 12:30 Report: Day 27 of the shutdown | Cohen reportedly paid company to rig online polls, boost his own image | Atlantic publishes 'Impeach Donald Trump' cover story Gillibrand to attend Women's March Iowa after announcing 2020 bid MORE (D-N.Y.), who recently announced her plans to run for the White House in 2020, reportedly touted her efforts fighting illegal immigration in old campaign mailers and appearances during her time in Congress. The Democratic senator said her work hastened the "removal of illegal aliens by expanding detention capacity and increasing the number

  • Jon Meacham Misuses a Reagan Anniversary to Preach the Gospel of Open Borders
    CIS.org

    Jon Meacham Misuses a Reagan Anniversary to Preach the Gospel of Open Borders

    Last week, on the 30th anniversary of President Ronald Reagan's farewell address to the nation, historian Jon Meacham appeared on both the New York Times op-ed page and MSNBC's "Morning Joe" program to lament the stark contrast between the smiling, open-borders Reagan and the snarling, tight-borders Donald Trump. Meacham acerbically observed that Reagan's words in 1989, written by acclaimed speechwriter Peggy Noonan, "are as different in spirit and in substance from Mr. Trump's as words could be and still be rendered in the same tongue." He quoted the speech's eloquently sentimental vision of America as "a city upon a hill", a place of shelter where, "If there had to be city walls, the walls

  • Spain to improve conditions at migrant centers
    seattlepi.com

    Spain to improve conditions at migrant centers

    BERLIN (AP) — The Latest on migrants in Europe (all times local): 2:25 p.m. Spain's government says it will improve conditions at its eight migrant detention centers and build another center as authorities struggle to cope with a surge in arrivals from North Africa by sea. Interior Minister Fernando Grande-Marlaska announced Friday the government intends to "ensure greater respect for people's dignity and their rights." The centers are supposed to house migrants who are illegally in Spain for up to 60 days, but that limit is often exceeded and conditions reportedly are cramped. Grande-Marlaska says the detainees aren't convicted of any crimes and are awaiting deportation. Some centers have witnessed

  • MS-13 and the violence driving migration from Central America
    feeds.cbsnews.com

    MS-13 and the violence driving migration from Central America

    Its name has become a sinister shorthand for the fear of violence seeping across America's borders. MS-13, or "Mara Salvatrucha," is one of the largest gangs in the world, a menace in several countries and a frequent target of President Trump's rhetoric. Its violent grip in Central America is one of the forces driving thousands of migrants to flee for the U.S. — which, ironically, is where the gang got its start. The Trump administration refers to MS-13 as "violent animals," and Mr. Trump often invokes MS-13's gruesome acts of violence to justify hardline policies against immigration.  "This is a crisis. You have human trafficking, you have drugs, you have criminals coming in, you have gangs,

  • Another Voice: President not empowered to legislate immigration laws
    The Buffalo News

    Another Voice: President not empowered to legislate immigration laws

    On Dec. 7, 2018, President Trump's asylum ban was declared illegal and unconstitutional by the ninth circuit court of appeals. The federal appeals court said, “([the president) may not rewrite the immigration laws to impose a condition that Congress has expressly forbidden.” U.S. law specifically allows individuals to apply for asylum whether or not they are at a port of entry. Last November Trump signed a presidential proclamation that would bar migrants who cross illegally into the U.S. through the southern border from seeking asylum outside of official ports of entry. We have a legislative process for enacting, amending and repealing laws in this country and the president cannot cut out the