U.S. immigration

Follow here for the latest news on family separation, border news and more.
  • Acting Head Of Customs And Border Protection Says New Asylum Rule In 'Pilot' Phase
    www.wnpr.org

    Acting Head Of Customs And Border Protection Says New Asylum Rule In 'Pilot' Phase

    Mark Morgan, acting head of Customs and Border Protection, said on Thursday that his agency is rolling out the Trump administration's new asylum rule as a small "pilot" for now but that officials expect it to be blocked in court. The rule is a major change in U.S. asylum law. It effectively denies asylum protection to most migrants arriving at the Southern border unless they first apply in a country they passed through on the way. "Although the new federal regulation allows us to apply that all 2,000 miles along the Southwest border, we're not going to do that. We're really piloting it in just one location," Morgan said during an interview on All Things Considered. In a statement on Friday, Morgan

  • BostonGlobe.com

    Climate argument injected into immigration debate

    Regarding John H. Henn's letter on “de facto open borders” (“Open borders pose a climate change nightmare for US,” July 16), I would like to make two points. First, the “climate footprint” of low-wealth Americans is far below that of average Americans. Moving here doesn't automatically increase your carbon footprint dramatically. Second, accelerating climate change affects not only “all who live in the United States,” but all life on earth, which is what makes climate change so hard to address. Defeatists like to argue that it doesn't matter what we do, because addressing climate change requires global action. The beauty of the Paris agreement — the accord that President Trump pulled us out of

  • Frustrated, overtaxed Border Patrol agents have this to say
    Dallas Morning News

    Frustrated, overtaxed Border Patrol agents have this to say

    He said an agent in the Las Cruces, N.M., Border Patrol station brought a copy of the form to the union's attention and explained that the Border Patrol supervisor had a stack of forms piled up on a desk, already signed and marked for medical clearances. The form, a copy of which was obtained by The News, was dated May 9, 2019, at the peak of the surge of migrants. It indicated that the newly arrived migrant required no medication and that the "subject is cleared for travel." Favela said he notified the sector about the form in person and via email and urged them to "stop immediately."   "You can see, I guess, the frustration of trying to get the people through as fast as possible, and that may

  • Fox News

    Border agents use tear gas to stop nearly 50 undocumented migrants who stormed Rio Grande bridge

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents had to use tear gas and pepper spray early Saturday to stop nearly 50 “undocumented individuals” from illegally entering the U.S. after they stormed a port of entry along the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas, officials said. The incident at the Pharr-Reynosa International Bridge took place at around 4 a.m. The bridge is closed between midnight at 6 a.m., but CBP has had to construct temporary barriers in the middle of the span due to the large influx of migrants using the bridge at night. A CBP official told Fox News the group attempted to rush across the bridge in three waves. "Ignoring commands to stop, the group suddenly rushed the temporary barricades,

  • the Guardian

    'This is an emergency': the volunteers bailing out migrants from detention

    For more than a year, Julie Sharron went quietly crazy reading news stories about migrants detained at the border, herded into detention centers, separated from their children and demonized by Donald Trump and his supporters as “criminals” and “animals”. As the granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, she was chilled by what she saw as inescapable historical parallels. Like many of her liberal friends living on Los Angeles' Eastside, she wrote outraged posts on social media, donated money and called her congressman. Then she remembered the emergency savings she'd inherited from her grandparents who made a good life for themselves after enduring years in Nazi camps and coming to the United States. “If this isn't an emergency, then I don't know what is,” she later wrote.

  • Pompeo to meet with Mexico's foreign minister to discuss immigration, trade
    Reuters

    Pompeo to meet with Mexico's foreign minister to discuss immigration, trade

    U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will meet with Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard on Sunday to discuss migration and trade, amid heightened bilateral tension ahead of a deadline on a deal that removed tariff threats on Mexican exports. Under the June agreement with the United States, Mexico averted punitive tariffs on U.S.-bound Mexican shipments threatened by President Donald Trump by promising to stem the flow of illegal migrants from Central America by July 22. The 10:30 A.M. meeting in Mexico City between Pompeo and Ebrard comes a day before the end of the 45-day period expires and as U.S lawmakers wrangle over a regional trade deal meant replace the current North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

  • We're all more connected to immigrants — and immigration policies — than we think
    The Des Moines Register

    We're all more connected to immigrants — and immigration policies — than we think

    I recently read a National Catholic Reporter piece that offered crucial advice to Americans today: Don't ignore our nation's current treatment of immigrants. It was notably titled “Don't look away from concentration camps at the border.” It's easy for many of us to distance ourselves from the treatment described in articles: People seeking refuge, crushed into cells. Children in cages or dying without medical treatment. Across our nation, families trembling in homes waiting for deportation. We can say “they” are not “us,” and that “we're” not personally doing this to “them.” But we're all more connected than we think.  I remember a childhood game we called “six degrees from Kevin Bacon,” where

  • Immigration protest speakers denounce racism, encourage undocumented to be prepared
    Chicago Tribune

    Immigration protest speakers denounce racism, encourage undocumented to be prepared

    Lorrell Kilpatrick, who leads Black Lives Matter – Gary, told a crowd of about 50 people who braved the heat outside the federal courthouse to protest U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids that she understands that people protest from their own comfort level. Some come out to protest at small gatherings, she said, and others might give money to a charity that helps oppressed groups.

  • Iowa victim's mother says Democrats' ideas on immigration will lead to more tragedies
    The Des Moines Register

    Iowa victim's mother says Democrats' ideas on immigration will lead to more tragedies

    Parents of an Iowa woman killed in a crash want a judge reprimanded because they say he set bond too low for the man accused of causing the accident. Police say the man, now on the lam, was in the U.S. illegally. COUNCIL BLUFFS, Ia. — An Iowa woman whose daughter was killed three years ago by a driver who was in the United States illegally joined Republican Party activists in her hometown to denounce Democratic presidential candidates' views on immigration. Sarah Root died in 2016. The Honduran driver who collided with her was unharmed and disappeared after posting bond. “Where is the justice for Sarah? Where is the justice for my family? I'm tired of justice being provided for illegal aliens," Sarah's

  • How To Speed Up Your Spousal U.S. Immigration Case
    Forbes

    How To Speed Up Your Spousal U.S. Immigration Case

    Recently, Congressional hearings considered the question of processing delays in U.S. immigration matters. One area that was identified where improvement was needed was with spousal sponsorships. If you look at the processing times published by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service, they look quite reasonable for today's applications. Yet to the untrained eye the processing times are deceptive, thus the reason why improvement is needed. A Long Process For example, an I-130 petition by a U.S. Citizen to sponsor his foreign spouse is taking about five months to be approved. You would think that is fairly reasonable. But that is not the end of the journey. Once the petition is approved, that

  • Help Wanted – The White, Protestant Kind
    Parlez-Vous American?

    Help Wanted – The White, Protestant Kind

    Rural Maine was in a bad way. Young people were leaving in droves, headed to the cities, or to other states to seek their fortune. Farms sat empty, while the farmers that remained couldn't find enough help. It's a story that has resonance today, when economists are warning that Maine, especially its rural areas, are seeing economic stagnation and a lack of population growth. In 1908, the Maine Bureau of Labor Statistics summed up the problem like this: The great need of the State is for young blood, people who will increase the population by rearing families that will have a love and desire for agricultural pursuits. This is the kind of people that will solve the question of abandoned farms and

  • Walsh: 'Illegal' immigrants have no rights
    Baltimore Sun

    Walsh: 'Illegal' immigrants have no rights

    This country's immigration system was set up to welcome qualified persons from other countries for just two reasons. Some wished to try for success in the more liberal environment afforded by the American Democratic Republic, a freedom afforded to citizens of this nation. Others came and applied for asylum here because of mistreatment (e.g. suspension of police protection or by false imprisonment or even death) at the hands of the governments of their native lands. We continue to accept such legitimate seekers of citizenship.

  • Instead of bowing to the division and hatred, let's give voice to those our president is trying to silence: Letter to the Editor
    cleveland.com

    Instead of bowing to the division and hatred, let's give voice to those our president is trying to silence: Letter to the Editor

    My name is Miguel. I am both a First Generation American, and a descendant of the Mayflower Pilgrims at the same time. My father was an immigrant from Mexico who served in the U.S. military in Desert Storm, before he was a citizen. My mother is descendant of many generations of proud Americans. My heritage is both Native American, and ancient Immigrant. I've been highly troubled by the president's racist remarks since he announced his candidacy. Last weekend's social media tirade and doubling down on his statements have only fanned the flames of division and hatred among our countrymen. We cannot allow this hate to drive our policies. If two very different people didn't come together and look

  • Home Ministry working to expand scope of NRC across India to deport illegal immigrants
    Hindustan Times

    Home Ministry working to expand scope of NRC across India to deport illegal immigrants

    While the finalisation of the National Register of Citizens (NRC) is at an advance stage in Assam, the Home Ministry is working on modalities to implement across the country the exercise to identify illegal immigrants for deportation. An amendment in the Foreigners (Tribunals) Order, 1964, issued by the central government on May 30 paves the way for expanding the scope of NRC beyond. The amended order empowers state governments and even district magistrates of all states and Union Territories to set up tribunals to identify a “foreigner” who is living in India illegally. Until now, only the Centre had the power to constitute such tribunals, which were essentially quasi-judicial bodies unique

  • Manus, Nauru And An Australian Detention Legacy – OpEd
    Eurasia Review

    Manus, Nauru And An Australian Detention Legacy – OpEd

    In the defunct Soviet Union, it was definitive of life: millions incarcerated, garrisons of forced labour, instruments of the proletarian paradise fouled. Titles suggested as much: Gustaw Herling's work was titled A World Apart; Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago likewise suggested societies marooned from the broader social project. In Australia, where offshore processing of naval arrivals and its own offerings of gulag culture were made, six years has passed since Nauru and Manus Island became outpost of indefinite detention. Whistleblowing has been criminalised; concerned doctors have been expelled; suicides, sexual assault and psychological mutilations have been normalised in the patchwork monstrosity that involves compromised local officials, private security firms and funding from the Australian tax payer.