U.S. military

The United States Armed Forces are the military forces of the United States of America. It consists of the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard. The President of the United States is the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces and forms military policy with the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS), both federal executive departments, acting as the principal organs by which military policy is carried out.
News on the U.S. Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard, and other aspects of the U.S. military.
  • The F-14 Tomcat: The Carrier Jet the Navy Secretly Misses?
    The National Interest

    The F-14 Tomcat: The Carrier Jet the Navy Secretly Misses?

    Although the F/A-XX and the Air Force’s F-X are in their infancy, it has become clear that they will be different aircraft designs that will probably share common technologies.While the requirement for a carrier-based long-range strike capability is a frequent subject of discussion around Washington, the U.S. Navy’s need for improved air superiority capabilities is often neglected.The service has not had a dedicated air-to-air combat aircraft since it retired the Grumman F-14 Tomcat in 2006. But even the Tomcat was adapted into a strike aircraft during its last years in service after the Soviet threat evaporated. Now, as new threats to the carrier emerge and adversaries start to field new fighters that can challenge the Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and Lockheed Martin F-35C Joint Strike Fighter (JSF), attention is starting to shift back to this oft-neglected Navy mission—especially in the Western Pacific.(This first appeared in 2016.)(Recommended: Is It Time to Bring Back the Battleships?)

  • Strait of Hormuz: imbalance of forces and guerilla warfare
    AFP

    Strait of Hormuz: imbalance of forces and guerilla warfare

    The deployment of 1,000 more US troops to the Middle East highlights the imbalance of forces in the region between Washington and Tehran, which is experienced in maritime guerilla warfare and likely to avoid full-scale battles, experts say. Washington has not specified when and where the new contingent will be deployed, but it comes less than three weeks after the US announced it was sending 1,500 soldiers, along with a squadron of fighter jets, to the region in response to alleged threats from the Islamic republic. Any open confrontation between Washington and Tehran would therefore pit the US superpower -- including its Bahrain-based Fifth Fleet and aircraft carriers -- and its allies Saudi Arabia and Israel against an isolated Iran, whose economy has been crippled by years of sanctions and its military resources limited.

  • Associated Press

    Millennial Money: 5 money tactics for military deployments

    While serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, Erik Goodge was severely wounded during a deployment to Afghanistan. At the time of his service, however, he didn't know nearly as much about personal finance. "It's not a priority on the radar of a lot of service members," Goodge says.

  • US announces $250 million in military aid to Ukraine
    AFP

    US announces $250 million in military aid to Ukraine

    The United States announced Tuesday a $250 million military aid package for war-torn Ukraine to strengthen the former Soviet republic's naval and land capabilities. The amount is part of a series of Pentagon payments now totaling $1.5 billion to the country since 2014, when Russia annexed the Crimean peninsula and a conflict erupted in eastern Ukraine. "The United States remains committed to helping Ukraine ... to strengthen democratic civilian control of the military, promote command and control reforms, enhance transparency and accountability in acquisition and budgeting, and advance defense industry reforms," a Pentagon spokesman said.

  • Let the SR-71 Stay in a Museum: The A-12 Spy Plane Will Make Your Heart Race
    The National Interest

    Let the SR-71 Stay in a Museum: The A-12 Spy Plane Will Make Your Heart Race

    In twelve-and-a-half minutes he completed his run and looped around over Thailand, where he received aerial refueling. Then he embarked on a second pass. But the North Vietnamese were waiting for him.Analysis of Week’s photos located the USS Pueblo near Wonsan anchored next to two patrol boats—and also revealed that Pyongyang had not mobilized its troops for war. This led Johnson to rule out plans for a preemptive or punitive strike in favor of diplomatic measures which eventually saw the ship’s abused crew released nearly a year later.On October 30, 1967, a CIA spy-plane soared eighty-four thousand feet over Hanoi in northern Vietnam, traveling faster than a rifle bullet at over three times the speed of sound. A high-resolution camera in the angular black jet’s belly recorded over a mile of film footage of the terrain below—including the over 190 Soviet-built S-75 surface-to-air missiles sites.(This first appeared several weeks ago.) The aircraft was an A-12 “Oxcart,” a smaller, faster single-seat precursor variant of the Air Force’s legendary SR-71 Blackbird spy plane.

  • Conspiracy of silence: For some veterans, toxic exposure didn't end with atomic blasts
    Stars and Stripes

    Conspiracy of silence: For some veterans, toxic exposure didn't end with atomic blasts

    WASHINGTON — Just before noon, sunlight escaped the Nevada desert and a midnight darkness overtook the bleak and lonely landscape. Eighteen-year-old Marine Cpl. Fred Walden was climbing out of his trench in the Yucca Flat northwest of Las Vegas. His hair was singed. “We were literally standing in the shadows of the mushroom cloud,” Walden, now 80, said from his home in Roseville, Calif. “It billowed out. You could see the leading edge drop back to earth.” The year was 1957. U.S. troops were secretly participating in U.S. atomic bomb tests and subsequent cleanup operations during World War II and later in the Pacific Ocean, the Nevada desert, New Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. The servicemembers

  • Canadian soldier killed in Bulgaria, says chief of defence staff
    BayToday.ca

    Canadian soldier killed in Bulgaria, says chief of defence staff

    OTTAWA — Gen. Jonathan Vance, Canada's chief of the defence staff, says a Canadian soldier has been killed in a parachuting accident in Bulgaria. Vance, who delivered the news before a federal cabinet meeting in Ottawa, says next of kin have been notified. He did not immediately release the soldier's name. Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan says the incident took place during a training exercise, and is promising an investigation into what happened. In a statement, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer offered condolences to the soldier's friends and family. The Canadian Press

  • AllAfrica.com

    Botswana: Retired Soldiers to Get Their Dues

    President Mokgweetsi Masisi has said government is in the process of coming up with the Military Veterans Act in an effort to address challenges be-devilling retired army officers. Addressing a Botswana Defence Force Retired Members Association Annual General Meeting in Mahalapye, Masisi promised that the act will provide structures and principles for governance of retired BDF members in line with international best practice. Further, Masisi said the legislation will provide a clear definition of a veteran; what qualifies him or her to be one; and manage expectations by elaborately spelling out entitlements to military veterans. "The Minister of Defence, Justice and Security, Shaw Kgathi has informed me that a Cabinet Memorandum on the enactment of a Military Veterans Act has already been submitted for consideration by Cabinet during the month of June," he pointed out.

  • Lockheed Martin Team Enhances Command and Control for Ballistic Missile Defense
    PR Newswire

    Lockheed Martin Team Enhances Command and Control for Ballistic Missile Defense

    Advanced Engage on Remote Capability Delivered to Combatant Commands PARIS , June 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Through ongoing modernization to the command, control, battle management and communications (C2BMC) ...

  • PR Newswire

    Homeland Security Research Corp. (HSRC): Big Data and Data Analytics in National Security is Forecast to Grow at a 2015-2022 CAGR of 17.5%

    WASHINGTON, June 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Big Data & Data Analytics Market is Booming! The Big Data & Data Analytics – Hardware, Software & Services Market in National Security & Law Enforcement: 2019-2022 report forecasts that this industry's revenues will grow at a 2015-2022 CAGR of 17.5%. The use of big data and data analytics by Homeland Security, Defense, Public Safety organizations and intelligence agencies is on the rise, mostly because the world is becoming more digital and connected. ...

  • Bawumia Graced 2nd Change Of Guards
    modernghana.com

    Bawumia Graced 2nd Change Of Guards

    Vice President Dr. Mahamudu Bawumia witnessed a colourful ceremony of the quarterly change of guard at the Presidency (Jubilee House) yesterday. This saw the change of security guards at the presidency from the officers and men of the Air Force to the Ghana Army.

  • Gun Question: Who Do So Many People Buy Glock?
    The National Interest

    Gun Question: Who Do So Many People Buy Glock?

    Why? For much of the mid-twentieth century, handgun development was in a period of stagnation. The development of the semiautomatic pistol had ushered in a new weapon that, although more complex than a revolver, had a higher ammunition capacity. Quickly adopted by armies around the world, the steel-framed semiautomatic reigned for decades. Then, in the 1980s, something came along that disrupted the firearms industry: the Glock handgun. Today it’s carried by armies worldwide, from the U.S. Army Rangers to the British Armed Forces.Recommended: Why North Korea Is Destined to Test More ICBMs and Nuclear WeaponsRecommended: 5 Most Powerful Aircraft Carriers, Subs, Bombers and Fighter Aircraft EverRecommended: North Korea Has 200,000 Soldiers in Its Special Forces

  • The Times of India

    Government restores provision of 'ration in kind' to military officers in peace areas

    NEW DELHI: The government has restored the provision of 'ration in kind' to military officers in peace areas, a defence official said on Tuesday. The facility was withdrawn by the government in 2017 and it started paying a certain amount in instead of the ration to defence personnel. "The Government of India has approved the proposal of the ministry of defence for restoration of the 'ration in kind' to the defence officers posted in peace areas," a defence official said. The decision to withdraw the provision of 'ration in kind' had met with criticism from several quarters within the three services of the armed forces.

  • 2020 Dems can't give Trump the high ground on national security
    The Hill

    2020 Dems can't give Trump the high ground on national security

    What is the smartest approach, politically and strategically, for a Democratic presidential candidate to take on matters of defense policy and national security? This question has bedeviled the party since the Vietnam War.  Democrats are not as a group innately anti-defense, of course, even though Republicans have certainly had political success portraying candidates like George McGovern and Michael Dukakis in such a light.  Nor do Republicans own any national security magic wand, as the Iraq War experience and other difficult experiences underscore. But still, the Democratic Party faces an important decision as 2020 approaches: How to free up funds for domestic investment and perhaps deficit

  • War vet Sen. Duckworth on Trump draft deferments: ‘I'm sorry, but it's baloney’
    Yahoo News

    War vet Sen. Duckworth on Trump draft deferments: ‘I'm sorry, but it's baloney’

    He's stealing from the military,” Sen. Duckworth told the Yahoo News show “Through Her Eyes.” “He's sending troops to the border to sit around in the desert,” she added. Sen. Duckworth was not impressed. “He likes the idea of war. “He's been a warmonger for a very long time.