• Bernie Sanders: 'Beating Trump is not good enough'
    Politics
    Yahoo News

    Bernie Sanders: 'Beating Trump is not good enough'

    Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., says his presidential campaign is about much more than beating President Trump.

  • Al Jazeera suspends two journalists over Holocaust report
    World
    AFP

    Al Jazeera suspends two journalists over Holocaust report

    Qatari state-funded broadcaster Al Jazeera suspended two journalists on Sunday over a video they produced claiming the extent of the Holocaust was being misrepresented by Jews. The clip, posted by Al Jazeera's online AJ+ Arabic service, claimed "the narrative" that the Nazis killed six million Jews was "adopted by the Zionist movement". The video said that "along with others, the Jews faced a policy of systematic persecution which culminated in the Final Solution".

  • US intelligence chiefs shared classified info with tech execs about doing business with China
    Business
    BGR News

    US intelligence chiefs shared classified info with tech execs about doing business with China

    The trade war with China has reached new heights in the past few weeks, as the Trump administration recently announced that US companies will be banned from buying equipment from certain Chinese companies. Huawei's name wasn't explicitly mentioned, but it was obviously implied that China's biggest tech company is included on the list. Separately, the US government also issued a ban that prevents Huawei from dealing with US tech companies, whether it's for parts procurement or software licenses. The first effects of that decision are already here, as Google has already said it will comply with the ban, effectively revoking Huawei's access to the version of Android that everybody wants. Several chipmakers, including Intel and Qualcomm, have also reportedly cut ties with Huawei for the time being.On top of that, a report reveals that top officials from the US intelligence community have been meeting with tech execs, universities, and trade organizations to brief them about the security perils related to doing business with China.The briefings began last October and have been held in California and Washington, The Financial Times reports (via The Verge), with US intelligence informing those in attendance about the cyber threats and the theft of intellectual property risks that come with dealing with China.Among those giving the briefings was Dan Coats, the director of national intelligence, the report notes. The meetings reportedly included the sharing of classified information, which is an unusual element for such meetings. It's unclear what kind of information was shared with tech execs during these meetings, and what companies attended them.Republican Senator Marco Rubio, one of the politicians who organized the meetings, confirmed their existence. "The Chinese government and Communist party pose the greatest long-term threat to US economic and national security," Rubio said. "It's important that US companies, universities, and trade organizations understand fully that threat."

  • Huawei mobile users ponder switching brand after Google news
    Business
    Reuters

    Huawei mobile users ponder switching brand after Google news

    LONDON/MUMBAI (Reuters) - Time to abandon the Huawei phone? Google said on Monday it would comply with an order by U.S. President Donald Trump to stop supplying Huawei, meaning it would no longer be able to offer its popular Android apps to buyers of new Huawei phones. The order to U.S. companies could affect tens of millions of consumers in Europe, its biggest market outside mainland China.

  • This Missile Might be the U.S. Navy's Most Important Weapon in Decades
    World
    The National Interest

    This Missile Might be the U.S. Navy's Most Important Weapon in Decades

    The Tomahawk and its controversies might make headlines, but as the U.S. Navy re-arms for high-tech warfare, the SM-6 is the missile to watch.The U.S. Navy in late January 2019 confirmed the designation of its newest cruise missile, in the process clarifying its long-term plan for arming its growing fleet of warships.The plan heavily leans on one missile, in particular. It's the SM-6, an anti-aircraft weapon that quickly is evolving to perform almost every role the Navy assigns to a missile.(This first appeared earlier in the year.)The Navy dubbed the newest version of the venerable Tomahawk cruise missile the "Block V" model, Jane's reported. There are two separate variants of the Block V missile, one with an anti-ship warhead and another with a warhead the Navy optimized for striking targets on land.Raytheon's Tomahawk has been the subject of controversy in Washington, D.C. In order to save money the Obama administration wanted to pause production of the long-range missile, which since the 1980s has been the Navy's main weapon for striking land targets from the sea.Congress overruled the Obama administration and continued buying Tomahawks for roughly $1 million apiece, adding potentially hundreds of the missiles to the thousands the fleet already possesses.

  • Blast hits Egypt tourist bus, 17 injured: security, medical sources
    World
    AFP

    Blast hits Egypt tourist bus, 17 injured: security, medical sources

    An explosion struck a tourist bus on Sunday near Egypt's famed pyramids, injuring 17 people including foreigners, security and medical sources said. South Africans and Egyptians were among those injured when an explosive device went off, hitting the bus in Giza, according to the sources. Sunday's incident comes after three Vietnamese holidaymakers and their Egyptian guide were killed when a roadside bomb hit their bus as it travelled near the pyramids outside Cairo in December.

  • Marlen Ochoa-Lopez: Mother and daughter 'distracted pregnant murder victim with photo album' before strangling her
    News
    The Independent

    Marlen Ochoa-Lopez: Mother and daughter 'distracted pregnant murder victim with photo album' before strangling her

    The pregnant 19-year-old who was murdered in Chicago was allegedly distracted by a mother and daughter with a photo album before being killed, according to court documents.The details surrounding the murder were made public by prosecutors as they sought to convince a judge not to release suspects Clarisa Figueroa, 46, and Desiree Figueroa, 24, who have been accused of executing a plot to kill Marlen Ochoa-Lopez in her ninth month of pregnancy.They reportedly lured the victim into their home by offering free baby clothes and a stroller, which they posted about online. Recently released details indicate the pair first tried to kill her by strangling her with a cord from behind.Prosecutors say that Ochoa-Lopez was able to get her fingers between the cord and her neck when the elder Figueroa first attempted to kill her. The alleged murderer then called for her daughter’s help, before then continuing to strangle Ochoa-Lopez for four to five minutes.The elder Figueroa then called emergency services, and said that the child she had just delivered was not breathing. The child is now reportedly in poor health, ad with “zero brain activity”.Police did not connect the murders until May, when they were made aware of Facebook communications between Ochoa-Lopez and the women.

  • Commander in chief Donald Trump, threatening 'official end of Iran' is not the endgame America needs
    Politics
    USA TODAY Opinion

    Commander in chief Donald Trump, threatening 'official end of Iran' is not the endgame America needs

    Tweets like 'If Iran wants to fight, that will be the official end of Iran' won't prepare Americans if saber rattling turns sobering reality: Our view

  • 'DM me': Warren wins over comedian with Twitter quip
    Politics
    Yahoo News

    'DM me': Warren wins over comedian with Twitter quip

    "Do you think Elizabeth Warren has a plan to fix my love life?" comedian Ashley Nicole Black tweeted, probably not expecting the response she got from the senator and presidential candidate.

  • Secret Service Officers Are Being Sent to the Border
    News
    The Daily Beast

    Secret Service Officers Are Being Sent to the Border

    Jose Luiz Gonzalez/ReutersThe U.S. Secret Service is now participating in a not-so-secret undertaking: dealing with the influx of migrants at America’s southern border. According to a communication from the Department of Homeland Security’s headquarters reviewed by The Daily Beast, the small law enforcement agency has sent personnel to the border already and is looking to send more in the coming weeks. The move came in response to a directive then-DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen sent out earlier this spring asking each component of the department to find volunteers and dispatch them to the border. Even though it’s most closely associated with the White House, the Secret Service—along with a host of other entities and agencies—is a component of DHS. And as a result, it’s shipping people south. A DHS spokesperson did not dispute this reporting. “As we have consistently said, the Department is considering all options to address the humanitarian and security crisis at our southern border,” said the spokesperson. “We will continue to work with our workforce to find dynamic solutions and funding to address this very serious problem. As part of this effort, it is our responsibility to explore fiscal mechanisms that will ensure the safety and welfare of both our workforce and the migrant population, which is also reflected in the supplemental request submitted to Congress.”The Daily Beast reported last week that the arm of DHS that handles threats to America’s cybersecurity and critical infrastructure, called the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, has struggled to find enough volunteers to head to the border and fulfill DHS headquarters’ request. The agency works to secure election systems, schools, and places of worship—all of which face acute threats. Besides protecting the president, the first family, and other prominent government figures, the Secret Service also conducts criminal investigations. Its focuses include financial crimes and cybersecurity threats. The diversion of law enforcement and national security personnel to the border has concerned some congressional Democrats, who say it may be a misuse of limited government resources. But pushing back against the dramatic increase in people trying to enter the U.S. through the southern border has become has become a singular priority of President Trump. In both March and April, law enforcement officials apprehended more than 100,000 people trying to enter the U.S., according to DHS statistics. During the Obama administration, the agency was beset by scandal: Washington socialites slipped past agents and crashed the president’s first state dinner; a Secret Service agent told his counterparts to stand down after a man fired a gun at the White House, thinking the sound came from a car backfiring; an agent who traveled to Amsterdam with the president to protect him got drunk and passed out in a hallway; and more, as NBC News has detailed. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

  • Fifth Guatemalan child dies in US immigration custody
    News
    AFP

    Fifth Guatemalan child dies in US immigration custody

    A 16-year-old boy died Monday at a Border Patrol station in Texas, becoming the fifth child from Guatemala to die since December after being apprehended by US border patrol agents. US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) said the teen, who was detained in south Texas's Rio Grande Valley on May 13 after crossing the border, was found unresponsive at the agency's Weslaco Station during a welfare check.

  • Ford cutting 7,000 salaried jobs under pressure to boost profits, reduce bureaucracy
    Business
    USA TODAY

    Ford cutting 7,000 salaried jobs under pressure to boost profits, reduce bureaucracy

    Ford workers opened their email Monday to find a letter from CEO Jim Hackett with details on how many salaried workers would be leaving the automaker.

  • World
    Reuters

    Eiffel Tower climber in custody after daring ascent

    Rescuers successfully talked down a man who scaled the upper heights of the Eiffel Tower on Monday, forcing the monument's evacuation, and handed him over to police. Television channels ran live shots as rescuers perched on the 324-metre (1,063-foot) tower's wrought-iron struts, just below the highest viewing platform, tried to persuade the unknown man to give himself up. The lattice tower, named after its designer and builder Gustave Eiffel, is one of the world's most recognisable landmarks.

  • 9 Cool Things We Learned Driving the Spectre Land Rover Defender
    Business
    Popular Mechanics

    9 Cool Things We Learned Driving the Spectre Land Rover Defender

    Created by the custom shop Himalaya, this Defender is a Land Rover like you've never seen before-complete with a Chevy V8 and a Jeep steering box.From Popular Mechanics

  • Business
    BGR News

    Anker’s true wireless earbuds fix everything wrong with the other brands’, and they’re down to $45 today

    The Soundcore Liberty Neo Truly-Wireless Earbuds by Anker are a tremendous value at their full retail price of $65, especially when you consider the fact that they improve upon Apple's $159 AirPods in every conceivable way. The graphene drivers produce better sound and deeper bass, the silicone tips fit better in your ears, and the IPX5 rating provides better water-resistance. They're among the best cord-free earbuds we've ever tested in this price range, and they just dropped to an all-time low of $44.99! Definitely pick up a pair before this excellent deal is done.Here are the bullet points from the product page: * Breathtaking Sound: Exceptional clarity delivered via Graphene drivers with deep, resonant bass. * Smaller & Lighter: Each bud weighs only 0.2 oz for incredible comfort and seamless sound that sits effortlessly in your ears. * 12-Hour Playtime: Get 3.5 hours' playtime from a single charge and 9 extra hours in the compact charging case. * Ultra-Fast Pairing: Push and Go Technology simplifies the setup: process so the last-paired device automatically connects on startup. * IPX5 Protection: Resists liquids for workouts in the sun or songs in the rain. * Hand-Free Calls: A built-in microphone ensures easy on-the-go phone calls.

  • Trump considering pardons for US military members convicted or accused of war crimes, officials say
    News
    The Independent

    Trump considering pardons for US military members convicted or accused of war crimes, officials say

    Donald Trump has indicated he is considering pardons for several US military members accused or convicted of war crimes, including high-profile cases of murder, attempted murder and desecration of a corpse, according to two US officials.The officials said the Trump administration had made expedited requests this week for paperwork needed to pardon the troops on or around Memorial Day.One request is for Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher of the Navy SEALs, who is scheduled to stand trial in the coming weeks on charges of shooting unarmed civilians and killing an enemy captive with a knife while deployed in Iraq.The others are believed to include the case of a former Blackwater security contractor recently found guilty in the deadly 2007 shooting of dozens of unarmed Iraqis; the case of Major Mathew Golsteyn, the Army Green Beret accused of killing an unarmed Afghan in 2010; and the case of a group of Marine Corps snipers charged with urinating on the corpses of dead Taliban fighters.The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to speak publicly, said they had not seen a complete list and did not know if other service members were included in the request for pardon paperwork.The White House sent requests on Friday to the Justice Department’s Office of the Pardon Attorney, which alerted the military branches, according to one senior military official. Pardon files include background information and details on criminal charges, and in many cases include letters describing how the person in question has made amends.The official said while assembling pardon files typically takes months, the Justice Department stressed that all files would have to be complete before Memorial Day weekend, because Mr Trump planned to pardon the men then. A second US official confirmed the request concerning Mr Gallagher.The military branches referred questions to the Justice Department, which declined to comment on the matter.Mr Trump has often bypassed traditional channels in granting pardons and wielded his power freely, sometimes in politically-charged cases that resonate with him personally, such as the conviction of former Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, Arizona.Earlier this month, the president pardoned former Army 1st Lieutenant Michael Behenna, who had been convicted of killing an Iraqi during an interrogation in 2008.While the requests for pardon files are a strong sign of the president’s plans, Mr Trump has been known to change his mind, and it is not clear what the impetus was for the requests. But most of the troops who are positioned for a pardon have been championed by conservative lawmakers and media organisations, such as Fox News, which have portrayed them as being unfairly punished for trying to do their job. Many have pushed for the president to intervene. The White House declined to comment.Pardoning several accused and convicted war criminals at once, including some who have not yet gone to trial, has not been done in recent history, legal experts said. Some worried that it could erode the legitimacy of military law and undercut good order and discipline in the ranks.“These are all extremely complicated cases that have gone through a careful system of consideration. A freewheeling pardon undermines that whole system,” said Gary Solis, a retired military judge and armour officer who served in Vietnam.“It raises the prospect in the minds of the troops that says, ‘Whatever we do, if we can get the folks back home behind us, maybe we can get let off.’”Mr Gallagher’s lawyer, Timothy Parlatore, was surprised by the news that the president could be considering a pardon, and said ideally the chief would be acquitted at trial.“We want the opportunity to exonerate my client,” Mr Parlatore said in an interview. “At the same time, there is always a risk in going to trial. My primary objective is to get Chief Gallagher home to his family. To that end, Chief Gallagher would welcome any involvement by the president.”The fact that the requests were sent from the White House to the Justice Department, instead of the other way around, is a reversal of long-established practices, said Margaret Love, who served as the US pardon attorney during the first Bush administration and part of the Clinton administration.Process aside, Ms Love said that pardoning the men would be an abrupt departure from the past.“Presidents use pardons to send messages. They recognise when a process wasn’t just or when punishments were too extreme, like for some nonviolent drug cases,” she said.“If this president is planning to pardon a bunch of people charged with war crimes, he will use the pardon power to send a far darker message.”The New York Times

  • Incest in Game of Thrones - why Jon and Daenerys shouldn't have children
    Entertainment
    The Telegraph

    Incest in Game of Thrones - why Jon and Daenerys shouldn't have children

    Warning: contains spoilers   If you had to sum up Game of Thrones to a newcomer, two words would immediately spring to mind: “dragons” and “incest”. The latter has been a key plot point since the very first episode. Without Jaime and Cersei’s scandalous rutting, Bran Stark might still be climbing the walls of Winterfell, and Ned would still have a head. At the end of season 7, Daenerys Targaryen and Jon Snow's simmering romantic tension had bubbled over into full-blown sex and, judging by their dragon-date and continual camaraderie, their relationship shows no sign of ending. There’s just one slight hitch with this burgeoning romance – and it’s not that Jon refused to bend the knee. As viewers watched Jon sneak into Daenerys’ cabin, a flashback confirmed what viewers had long suspected. Dany is actually Jon’s aunt. With season eight kicking off by Sam telling Jon the truth about his lineage (and the Throne-deserving nephew to his aunt shortly thereafter), we’ll finally find out what the repercussions of this (mis)match will be. But there are some historical lessons that might be of interest to the pair.  Can an aunt and her nephew get married? Short answer? No. It’s illegal. It is in UK law, anyway. (It’s also prohibited by many world religions, including Christianity, Islam and Hinduism.) Daenerys Targaryen and Jon Snow on HBO's Game of Thrones But while it may seem icky to us, avunculate marriages have taken place throughout history. In fact, they were once frequent among the royal houses of Europe. More often than not, this was to consolidate alliances between countries. Couples skirted around the religious questions with a special dispensation from the Pope. One family who had to call on this papal permission frequently were the Hapsburgs, the Holy Roman Emperors who dominated Europe for over three hundred years. One of the reasons they clung on to this power for so long was their tendency to “keep it in the family”. The Hapsburgs became so inbred that they had a deformity named after them. The “Hapsburg Jaw” ensured that these almighty kings struggled in the looks department. Years of inbreeding culminated in King Charles II of Spain, the last and most deformed of the Spanish Hapsburg rulers. His prominent jaw was immortalised in portraits by Titian and Velázquez, and his tongue was said to be so big for his mouth that he would struggle to speak and drool when he managed. Charles II of Spain and the “Hapsburg Jaw” (1677-9) by Juan Carreño de Miranda Scientists have since concluded that Charles’s many symptoms, which included impotence, an oversized head and swelling all over his body, suggest that he suffered from two genetic disorders: thyroid deficiency and renal tubular acidosis. His parents were uncle and niece. Jon and Daenerys, take note. The Hapsburgs clearly didn’t learn from these mistakes. Charles II’s sister, Margaret Theresa of Spain, was married off to their maternal uncle (and paternal first cousin once removed), the Holy Roman Emperor Leopold. Unsurprisingly, all four of Margaret and Leopold’s children suffered from the consanguineous union, with only one surviving infancy. Overall, then, while intermarriage might make political sense, it could result in dodgy jawlines and sickly children. It would also raise a few eyebrows. Not that Tyrion seemed to mind, en route to King's Landing. The Raven newsletter in-article What about brother and sister? As Cersei often states in a desperate attempt to justify her relationship with twin Jaime, the Targaryens have been marrying brother to sister for hundreds of years. Like all marriages, though, these weren’t without their problems. It’s often hinted that years of incestuous Targaryen marriages produced several mad kings – most famously, Daenerys’s father Aerys II. Viserys Tragaryen, brother of Daenerys, on Game of Thrones Credit: HBO George RR Martin’s latest work Fire and Blood (a prequel to A Song of Ice and Fire, on which the TV series is based) might be more than just a treat for superfans, and something from which we can learn as well. The most famous sibling marriage in Westerosi history is Aegon the Conqueror, who had a bigamous marriage with his two sisters. Between them, the siblings conquered Westeros with their dragons. Despite some protest from religious figures, the Targaryens kept up this tradition. When a sibling wasn’t available, they tended to marry a relative that was. Sibling incest has pretty much always been taboo in the real world. There have, however, been a few examples of royal sibling marriages. Most famous of all were those in the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. Cleopatra VII (she of Shakespearean fame) was married to her younger brother Ptolemy XIII. As if that wasn’t narrowing the gene pool enough, her parents were uncle and niece as well as cousins. Similarly, Tutankhamun’s parents were siblings, and he was married to his own half-sister Ankhesenamun. Scientists have proven from King Tut’s remains that, for all the beauty of his famous golden death-mask, he can’t have been much of a looker. He suffered from a cleft palate and club foot, congenital defects which likely came about through his incestuous ancestry. These ancient royal marriages were often “justified” by the fact their gods married their siblings. In the Egyptians’ case, this was Osiris and Isis. The Egyptian royal family believed they were descendants of the gods and needed to keep the bloodline pure.  This pureblood argument is one that the Targaryens were especially fond of, too. The less dragon blood in other families, the less likely it was that rivals could get hold of a dragon and take the throne. Game of Thrones: 20 book bits they cut from the show, from Daenerys's lesbian sex to Tyrion's hideous crimes Nor do marriages between former brothers and sisters-in-law seem to be a problem in Game of Thrones. After Joffrey’s traumatic purple-infused death, the freshly widowed Margaery was hitched to Joffrey’s brother Tommen. Compare Henry VIII, who wanted to marry his dead brother’s wife Catherine of Aragon, but had to get a special dispensation from the Pope because, according to Leviticus, “if a man shall take his brother's wife, it is an unclean thing: he hath uncovered his brother's nakedness; they shall be childless’. Later Henry would decide that the marriage was cursed because it was incestuous – and that was why he and Catherine had failed to produce a male heir. (Funny how this epiphany happened around the same time Anne Boleyn arrived on the scene...). All in all, history teaches us that Jon and Daenerys’s match wouldn't be too unfeasible – and, as relationships go, it would be less taboo than Jaime and Cersei’s. But spare a thought for the children. Not to mention those who might have to be ruled by the little interbred princeling. GOT What happens next no-reg Will Jon and Dany rule together? Twincest-wise, it wasn't a good idea for Cersei and Jaime and it wouldn't be much better for Dany and Jon. If not, arguably, far worse. It's not so much that the duo being related is issue number one, either, but that these related rulers-in-waiting would be trying to do so in a landscape filled with bereavement and madness. Dany doesn't want to share the Iron Throne, Jon has never wanted it altogether, and their respective followers would be far from happy to see them take it together. Especially after they were clearly in clear opposition to each other with Dany bonfired King's Landing. Game of Thrones Season 8 | Latest news You can catch up on Game of Thrones season 1-8 on NOW TV with a one week free Entertainment Pass trial.

  • Hundreds protest Alabama abortion ban: 'My body, my choice!'
    News
    Associated Press

    Hundreds protest Alabama abortion ban: 'My body, my choice!'

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Hundreds of demonstrators marched to the Alabama Capitol on Sunday to protest the state's newly approved abortion ban, chanting "my body, my choice!" and "vote them out!"

  • Australia's conservatives secure majority government: ABC
    World
    AFP

    Australia's conservatives secure majority government: ABC

    Australia's ruling conservative coalition is set to secure a governing majority in its shock election victory over the centre-left Labor Party, the national broadcaster ABC projected Monday. Prime Minister Scott Morrison's Liberal-National coalition will hold at least 77 seats in the 151-member lower house, one more than needed to govern on its own, ABC's election analysts projected. A number of close races across the vast island continent were still to be officially decided following Saturday's vote, with the formal count by the Australian Electoral Commission not expected to conclude until later this week.

  • F-16 fighter jet crashes into warehouse near March Air Reserve Base in California
    News
    USA TODAY

    F-16 fighter jet crashes into warehouse near March Air Reserve Base in California

    The crash happened as the pilot was landing following a routine training mission, March Air Reserve Base Deputy Fire Chief Timothy Holliday said.

  • Chips are down: Huawei U.S. blacklisting knocks semiconductor stocks
    Business
    Reuters

    Chips are down: Huawei U.S. blacklisting knocks semiconductor stocks

    U.S. and European chipmakers fell sharply on Monday amid worries the Huawei Technologies suppliers may suspend shipments to the Chinese firm due to a U.S. crackdown. The selling came after Nikkei Asian Review reported that Infineon had halted shipments to Huawei after Washington added the world's No. 2 smartphone maker to a trade blacklist last week, imposing restrictions that will make it difficult to do business with U.S. companies. Reuters reported that Alphabet Inc's Google had suspended some business with Huawei and Lumentum Holdings Inc, seen as a major supplier of Apple Inc's face ID technology, said it had discontinued all shipments to Huawei.

  • GMC Limits the Sierra's New CarbonPro Bed to a Pricey Option Package
    Business
    Car and Driver

    GMC Limits the Sierra's New CarbonPro Bed to a Pricey Option Package

    The carbon-composite bed in the 2019 GMC Sierra will be available on a limited basis this summer and more widely in the 2020 model.