• Trump impeachment narrative gathers steam as diplomats fill in details
    Politics
    Yahoo News

    Trump impeachment narrative gathers steam as diplomats fill in details

    In the first week of public impeachment hearings, three witnesses, all veteran U.S. diplomats, added details of what they knew of President Trump's efforts to get Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, a plan whose unraveling threatens his presidency. While the fundamental partisan dynamics of the inquiry continue to hold — Democrats who control the House appear poised to impeach the president, while Republicans in the Senate are unlikely to convict him — this week's developments shed new light on the months-long effort by the Trump administration to procure investigations from a foreign government.

  • Pope hosts meal for 1,500 poor and homeless
    World
    AFP

    Pope hosts meal for 1,500 poor and homeless

    Pope Francis on Sunday hosted around 1,500 poor and homeless people for lunch at the Vatican, decrying indifference to poverty as the Catholic Church marked its World Day of the Poor. "My thoughts go to those who... have promoted solidarity initiatives to give concrete hope to the most disadvantaged," Pope Francis told a mass in Saint Peter's Square ahead of the lunch.

  • Chile police stopped rescue workers helping dying protester: human rights watchdog
    World
    Reuters

    Chile police stopped rescue workers helping dying protester: human rights watchdog

    Chile's independent human rights watchdog said on Saturday it would file a formal complaint for murder against police officers who allegedly prevented paramedics from attending a heart attack victim amid a protest Friday. Security forces firing tear gas, rubber bullets and water cannons made it impossible for rescue workers to properly treat the victim, Chile's publicly-funded National Institute for Human Rights said. Twenty-nine year old Abel Acuna died shortly after at a nearby Santiago hospital.

  • Nuclear missile bunker: yours for less than $400k
    News
    The Guardian

    Nuclear missile bunker: yours for less than $400k

    One local newspaper described the sales listing, with calculated understatement, as a “mid-century fixer-upper”: an underground bunker built to withstand a nuclear attack, and to house the fire power to retaliate. The decommissioned nuclear silo in southern Arizona was once home to the Titan II, the largest intercontinental ballistic missile deployed by the US Air Force. The silo's owner, Rick Ellis, told the Arizona Daily Star newspaper that he was selling the property because he's “bored”.

  • There have been more mass shootings than days in 2019
    News
    CBS News

    There have been more mass shootings than days in 2019

    The number of mass shootings across the U.S. thus far in 2019 has outpaced the number of days this year, according to a gun violence research group. This puts 2019 on pace to be the first year since 2016 with an average of more than one mass shooting a day. As of November 17, which is the 321st day of the year, there have been 369 mass shootings in the U.S., according to data from the nonprofit Gun Violence Archive (GVA), which tracks every mass shooting in the country.

  • This Decision Could Be Bigger Than Impeachment
    Politics
    The Daily Beast

    This Decision Could Be Bigger Than Impeachment

    Overlooked as the nation was riveted by the opening days of the televised impeachment proceedings was an appeals court decision that started a clock ticking for the Supreme Court to finally pick a side in what Attorney General Bill Barr has called a “scorched earth, no-holds-barred war” between Congress and a president who has categorically refused to cooperate with its investigations into his misconduct. Unless the Supreme Court acts, Trump's taxes—which he has fought furiously to keep hidden since beginning his campaign for the presidency— will be turned over to Congress as soon as Wednesday. Thus, the nation will soon begin to learn whether the Supreme Court's conservative majority is, as Trump himself hopes, composed of “Trump judges” willing to side with the president in cases where lower courts have shrugged aside the president's weak arguments for stonewalling investigations into his misconduct.

  • Chinese students head to mainland, fleeing Hong Kong unrest
    World
    Associated Press

    Chinese students head to mainland, fleeing Hong Kong unrest

    The mainland Chinese students arriving from Hong Kong huddled with their suitcases, waiting for a bus to take them to temporary accommodation in this city across the border from the protest-wracked territory. “We've just escaped,” said one postgraduate student, among a dozen from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. The party organization said in a notice this week that mainland students could stay free-of-charge at one of 12 designated youth hostels in the southern Chinese city less than 30 kilometers (20 miles) from the chaos.

  • Why Russian Fighter Jets Are Threatening NATO In The Baltics
    World
    The National Interest

    Why Russian Fighter Jets Are Threatening NATO In The Baltics

    Key point: Russia and NATO's military buildup in the Baltics is creating a tense situation. In the most recent illustration of ongoing Russia-NATO military tensions over Baltic airspace, recently released footage shows a Russian Su-27 fighter making a sharp turn into an American F-15C. It is unclear when the video was filmed, with some speculating that it occured during a prior NATO BAP (Baltic Air Policing) mission. When viewed in that light, this incident seems to fall into the trend of what US officials have previously described as “unsafe” Russian interceptions and “aggressive maneuvers” in high-tension airspace.

  • Racist, anti-Semitic incidents prompt Syracuse to halt fraternity activities; Alpha Chi Rho suspended
    News
    USA TODAY

    Racist, anti-Semitic incidents prompt Syracuse to halt fraternity activities; Alpha Chi Rho suspended

    Syracuse University suspended one fraternity and halted social activities at all the school's fraternities for the rest of the semester after a series of racist and anti-Semitic incidents that have prompted days of protests, the school president announced Sunday. "Last night, one of our African American students reported being subjected to a verbal racial epithet from a group of students and visitors to our campus," Chancellor Kent Syverud said in a statement. Syverud's action was the latest in a series of crackdowns on fraternities across the nation and comes less than a week after San Diego State University suspended all Interfraternity Council-affiliated organizations following the death of a freshman who had attended a fraternity event.

  • On an upswing, the Pete Buttigieg show rolls through New Hampshire
    Politics
    Yahoo News

    On an upswing, the Pete Buttigieg show rolls through New Hampshire

    Earlier this week, Pete Buttigieg traveled more than 100 miles through the Granite State on a bus emblazoned with his name and packed with over a dozen journalists. It's a spectacle that hasn't been seen in recent presidential races, but it's part of a freewheeling strategy that has helped bring Buttigieg from relative obscurity to the top of the Democratic primary field. As the bus headed toward Buttigieg's third event of the day in Rochester, N.H., on Monday, news broke that a Quinnipiac University poll was showing the South Bend, Ind., mayor in third place in the state, just 1 percentage point behind Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

  • S. African asylum-seekers held on trespassing charges
    World
    AFP

    S. African asylum-seekers held on trespassing charges

    South African police detained more than 180 foreign nationals for storming the UN refugee agency in Pretoria, where they had been staging a sit-in protest, police said Saturday. Hundreds of asylum-seekers started camping in front of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) on October 8, asking to be relocated to another country after a spate of xenophobic violence in September. Protesters broke into the UNHCR premises on Thursday after they were informed of a court order giving them three days to vacate the site.

  • News
    Reuters

    Man kills wife, three young sons in San Diego home - police

    Three young boys and two adults were fatally shot and another boy was wounded in a domestic dispute that escalated into a shooting on Saturday in southeastern San Diego, police said. Three other boys, ages 5, 9 and 11, were taken to a hospital where two of them died, San Diego Police Chief David Nisleit said during a news conference. "When the officers arrived on the scene, they were able to look into one of the windows and see a small child inside covered in blood," San Diego Police Lieutenant Matt Dobbs said.

  • Trump hosts White House screening of 'Joker'
    Entertainment
    Yahoo News

    Trump hosts White House screening of 'Joker'

    A supervillain was inside the White House Saturday night. CNN's Shimon Prokupecz reported that President Trump hosted a showing of “Joker,” which tells the origin story of Batman's archnemesis. “Joker,” which was released in theaters in October, stars Joaquin Phoenix as Arthur Fleck, a disturbed young comedian who descends into a world of crime.

  • Elephant dies in captivity after killing villagers
    World
    Yahoo News Video

    Elephant dies in captivity after killing villagers

    An elephant named after Osama bin Laden, the late al-Qaida leader, has died in captivity after he was captured following a massive hunt in northeastern India, officials said Sunday.

  • Forgotten Genocide: How a Quarter of Europe’s Roma Were Murdered by the Nazis, then Erased From History
    World
    The Daily Beast

    Forgotten Genocide: How a Quarter of Europe’s Roma Were Murdered by the Nazis, then Erased From History

    An eyewitness account by a Holocaust survivor—unearthed for a new exhibition in London—describes the conditions in the “gypsy” section of Auschwitz as even more inhumane than the rest of the appalling facility. “The conditions were worse than in the other camps,” wrote eyewitness Hermann Langbein in 1945. The gypsies were still wearing the clothes that they had been given upon arrival… footwear was missing… The latrines were built in such a way that they were practically unusable for the gypsy children.

  • How to watch the Leonids meteor shower
    News
    CBS News

    How to watch the Leonids meteor shower

    Colorful shooting stars will soon streak across the night sky during one of the most famous annual meteor displays. The Leonids meteor shower is expected to peak Sunday night into Monday morning, November 17-18. The Leonid meteor shower occurs every year when Earth passes through a cloud of debris left behind by comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle.

  • The War That Made India a 'Great Power' (And Hurt Pakistan to This Day)
    World
    The National Interest

    The War That Made India a 'Great Power' (And Hurt Pakistan to This Day)

    When British India became independent in 1947, the country was divided into Hindu India and Muslim Pakistan. The problem was that East Pakistan and West Pakistan were almost a thousand miles apart, and wedged in between them was archenemy India. Imagine if the United States only consisted of the East Coast and West Coast, and Russia controlled all of North America in between.

  • Lebanon’s outgoing PM blasts president’s party over delays
    World
    Associated Press

    Lebanon’s outgoing PM blasts president’s party over delays

    Lebanon's political crisis worsened Sunday with the outgoing prime minister harshly criticizing the party of the country's president, blaming it for weeks of delay in forming a new Cabinet amid ongoing anti-government protests. A statement released by Saad Hariri's office called the policies of President Michel Aoun's party “irresponsible regarding that national crisis that they country is passing through.” Aoun has yet to call for consultations with parliamentary blocs' leaders to name a new premier, nearly three weeks after Hariri resigned amid nationwide protests. Some major factions in Lebanon's sectarian political system want to keep Hariri in the new government.

  • UN warns Bolivia crisis could ‘spin out of control’ after nine killed in latest violence
    World
    The Independent

    UN warns Bolivia crisis could ‘spin out of control’ after nine killed in latest violence

    The United Nations has warned mounting unrest in Bolivia could “spin out of control” after nine people died in the latest escalation of violence between between security forces and supporters of former president Evo Morales. Protesters loyal to Mr Morales, who resigned from office and fled to Mexico after being accused of electoral fraud, were fired upon by armed police on Friday after attempting to cross a military checkpoint in the central city of Sacaba. Bolivia's national ombudsman later confirmed nine people had died, bringing the death toll from the violence which has rocked the country to 23.

  • Leading Muslim groups to challenge India holy site court ruling
    World
    AFP

    Leading Muslim groups to challenge India holy site court ruling

    Two leading Muslim groups said Sunday they will file petitions in India's top court challenging its decision to award Hindus control of a bitterly disputed holy site that has sparked deadly inter-religious violence. The Supreme Court ruled on November 9 that the holy site in Ayodhya, where Hindu mobs destroyed a 460-year-old mosque in 1992, must be managed by a trust to oversee the construction of a Hindu temple. A separate piece of land in Ayodhya would be given over to a Muslim group to build a "prominent" new mosque.

  • Stents no better than drugs for many heart patients - U.S. study
    Health
    Reuters

    Stents no better than drugs for many heart patients - U.S. study

    Many patients with severe but stable heart disease who routinely undergo invasive procedures to clear and prop open clogged arteries would do as well by just taking medications and making lifestyle changes, U.S. researchers reported on Saturday. The $100 million government-backed study, presented at the American Heart Association (AHA) meeting in Philadelphia, is the largest yet to look at whether procedures to restore normal blood flow in patients with stable heart disease offers an added benefit over more conservative treatment with aspirin, cholesterol-lowering drugs and other measures. At least two prior studies determined that artery-clearing and stenting or bypass surgery in addition to medical treatment does not significantly lower the risk of heart attacks or death compared with non-invasive medical approaches alone.

  • Three family murder-suicides within ten days shock Turkey as the country faces record unemployment
    World
    The Telegraph

    Three family murder-suicides within ten days shock Turkey as the country faces record unemployment

    The deaths of three separate families within ten days have shocked Turkey as the country struggles with mass unemployment and a financial crisis. On Friday, authorities confirmed that a family of three had been found dead in their home in the central Istanbul district of Bakırköy, poisoned by cyanide. Earlier in the month, police discovered the bodies of a family of four, including a nine year-old daughter and a five year-old son, in their home in the southern city of Antalya.

  • Chicago teachers approve 'historic' contract that ended 11-day strike
    News
    USA TODAY

    Chicago teachers approve 'historic' contract that ended 11-day strike

    Teachers officially approved a contract deal Friday following an 11-day strike in the nation's third-largest school district last month. Teachers went on strike Oct. 17 after months of failed negotiations with Chicago Public Schools and the city.The strike idled academics, sports and college prep for about 350,000 students and their families. Members of the union's governing body voted in favor of a tentative agreement with the city on Oct. 30, bringing the strike to an end the next day.

  • 'I stand for the truth': the man sentenced to 47 years for crimes he didn't commit
    News
    The Guardian

    'I stand for the truth': the man sentenced to 47 years for crimes he didn't commit

    Ruben and Maria Martinez are having a honeymoon this week – 12 years after their wedding day. The LA district attorney's office agreed that Ruben was wrongfully convicted, a judge formally deemed him innocent, and for the first time in more than 4,500 days, Ruben walked free. “This is a divine miracle,” Ruben, now 49, told the Guardian on Thursday, as he sat inside the food pantry in El Monte, just outside of LA, where Maria works.

  • Here's everything we know about Mina Chang, who rapidly rose from a self-described singer to a State Department official with a dubious résumé
    News
    Business Insider

    Here's everything we know about Mina Chang, who rapidly rose from a self-described singer to a State Department official with a dubious résumé

    Department of State Mina Chang, a 35-year-old State Department official, prompted a flurry of interest over her credentials this week after she was alleged to have embellished her work history and educational experience. In a statement from her previous nonprofit group, executive director Ian Dailey characterized the news reports as a "classic 'hit-job'" and said he was "disgusted with the unwarranted attack" against Chang. Here's what we know about Chang, who joined the Trump administration in April.