• Trump says 'good chance' Democrats will back his immigration, border plan
    Politics
    Reuters

    Trump says 'good chance' Democrats will back his immigration, border plan

    A day after unveiling a plan to shift to a "merit-based" immigration system, the Republican president said there was a "good chance" that Democrats would back him and provide funding to manage record migrant flows along the U.S.-Mexico border. "The Democrats now realize that there is a National Emergency at the Border and that, if we work together, it can be immediately fixed. Such talk of bipartisan cooperation on the explosive immigration issue for years has ended in failure and finger-pointing.

  • 2020 Vision: There are 14 white male Dems running for president. So why should Kamala Harris settle for veep?
    Politics
    Yahoo News

    2020 Vision: There are 14 white male Dems running for president. So why should Kamala Harris settle for veep?

    Few have suggested that any of the white guys in the race would be better suited to serve as vice president. That dubious honor, it seems, has so far been reserved for candidates of color — black women in particular.

  • ‘Fox & Friends’ Host Brian Kilmeade: Border Crisis Is ‘Almost Like’ 9/11
    News
    The Daily Beast

    ‘Fox & Friends’ Host Brian Kilmeade: Border Crisis Is ‘Almost Like’ 9/11

    Remember when terrorists attacked the World Trade Center and Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001, killing 3,000 people and sending the U.S. down a path of never-ending war? Or when the financial markets melted down in 2008, causing the Great Recession with millions of jobs lost?According to Fox News host Brian Kilmeade the influx of asylum-seeking migrants arriving at America’s southern border is akin to both.During Friday’s broadcast of President Trump’s favorite morning show Fox & Friends, the curvy-couch crew discussed the president’s recently unveiled immigration plan. After co-hosts Ainsley Earhardt and Steve Doocy seemed to acknowledge the president’s proposal likely won’t go very far, Kilmeade pivoted to the situation at the border.“But you know what I want and I think we all want?” Kilmeade declared. “There is a five-alarm fire out on our southern border right now and the men and women every day need some help. And this plan—this plan is not going to help.”Doocy jumped in, claiming this was why Trump “essentially rolled this out,” adding that the president is saying he wants immigration reform and the only way to achieve it is “to elect more Republicans.”This prompted Kilmeade to take aim at Democrats, scolding the party’s leaders for calling the situation at the border a “manufactured crisis” before likening it to the worst terror attack in the nation’s history.“But there's an opportunity because there are times when Democrats and Republicans come together,” he exclaimed. “When the market fell apart in 2008 and after 9/11, this is almost like that at the border.”Kilmeade added: “We have never seen these numbers before and the men and women who have to round up these illegals who want to become part of our country are saying please help us.”This is far from the first time that the conservative cable news host has fear-mongered on immigration. He’s repeatedly warned about non-English speaking kids “flooding” American school systems and floated putting missiles on drones to stop “people storming the border.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

  • View Photos of the First Hot Wheels Toy Based on a Fan's Custom Car
    Lifestyle
    Car and Driver

    View Photos of the First Hot Wheels Toy Based on a Fan's Custom Car

    A flame-throwing, 600-hp ground-bound jet from Jersey is cool enough-then they up and made a toy version.From Car and Driver

  • World
    Bloomberg

    Erdogan Slams Turkish Tycoon Who Dared to Criticize Policies

    “What was Turkey’s per capita income 17 years ago, and what is it now?” Erdogan said late Thursday during a speech in Istanbul. Ozilhan this week made comments seen as criticism of Turkey’s economy and governance.

  • Death row inmate dies 1 day after fellow inmate's execution
    News
    Associated Press

    Death row inmate dies 1 day after fellow inmate's execution

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Tennessee death row inmate died in prison on Friday, less than three months before his scheduled execution and less than a day after a fellow inmate was executed .

  • Here Is Russia's Plan to Build a Fleet of Su-57 Stealth Fighters
    World
    The National Interest

    Here Is Russia's Plan to Build a Fleet of Su-57 Stealth Fighters

    The Su-57 is coming—76 of them over the next decade, to be exact.Russian President Vladimir Putin announced at a Kremlin meeting that the Russian Defense Ministry plans to procure 76 Su-57 fifth-generation fighters by 2028, himself acknowledging that these new quantities dwarf previous Russian defense ministry estimates: "The 2028 arms program stipulated the purchase of 16 such jets… In the nearest future we will sign a package contract to supply 76 such jets equipped with modern weapons of destruction and provided with the necessary land infrastructure."The announcement defies the western defense analysis consensus, which concluded that the Su-57 will not enter production until the late 2020’s. Even then, it was alleged that Russia lacks the industrial output to churn out Su-57 fighters in militarily meaningful numbers.If the Kremlin’s new forecast proves to be accurate, what accounts for this drastic output increase?

  • World
    Reuters

    US STOCKS-Wall St set to open lower after China's tough talk on trade

    Wall Street was set to break a three-day winning streak on Friday, as trade worries returned after Chinese media took a hard stance on the tariff dispute between the United States and China. The trade war will only make China stronger and will never bring the country to its knees, the ruling Communist Party's People's Daily wrote in a front-page commentary. The two sides are expected to meet in China to resume talks soon.

  • Barr: Probe Into Russia Investigation’s Origins Has Yielded ‘Inadequate’ Explanations
    Politics
    National Review

    Barr: Probe Into Russia Investigation’s Origins Has Yielded ‘Inadequate’ Explanations

    Weeks into an investigation of the origins of the FBI's investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election, Attorney General William Barr said Friday that the probe has provided more questions than answers due to the “inadequate” and in some cases inconsistent answers he's been given from the officials involved.Asked during an interview with Fox News whether he knew exactly when the FBI began its investigation into the Trump campaign, Barr said he had not yet identified a reliable timeline.“I’ve been trying to get answers to the questions, and I've found that a lot of the answers have been inadequate and some of the explanations I've gotten don't hang together. In a sense I have more questions today than when I first started,” he said during the interview.Pressed to explain what he was referring to, Barr would only say, “some of the explanations of what occurred.”Barr told Fox that the investigation, which he disclosed to lawmakers during a congressional hearing last month, will eventually reveal whether the FBI puts its “thumb on the scale” by investigating and in some cases surveilling Trump campaign officials.“People have to find out what the government was doing during that period. If we're worried about foreign influence, for the very same reason we should be worried about whether government officials abuse their power and put their thumb on the scale,” Barr said before stipulating that he was “not saying that happened.”Barr was maligned by congressional Democrats in the wake of his appearance on Capitol Hill last month for agreeing with Republicans' contention that the Trump campaign was “spied” on. He defended that characterization during the Fox interview and reiterated that his job is to determine whether that spying was properly predicated.“Government power was used to spy on American citizens,” he said in justifying his review. “I can’t imagine any world where we wouldn’t take a look and make sure that was done properly.”In addressing whether the investigation was properly predicated, Barr suggested that it was “very unusual” for the FBI to rely on the Steele dossier, an unverified piece of opposition research commissioned by the Clinton campaign, to secure a FISA warrant to surveil Carter Page.“It’s a very unusual situation to have opposition research like that, especially one that on its face had a number of clear mistakes and a somewhat jejune analysis,” Barr said. “And to use that to conduct counterintelligence against an American political campaign is a strange — would be a strange development.”

  • 'The point is to overturn Roe v Wade': How a quiet Republican effort to limit abortion rights has blown up into a full scale attack on women's rights
    News
    The Independent

    'The point is to overturn Roe v Wade': How a quiet Republican effort to limit abortion rights has blown up into a full scale attack on women's rights

    Back in February, as the United States obsessed over whether Donald Trump would force a second government shutdown, Ohio state senator Kristina Roegner quietly introduced a bill that is now part of a flood of laws threatening the right to an abortion all across the country.The bill, known as a “heartbeat” abortion bill, received little national press. But, when it was signed into law in April, it made good on a near seven-year effort to restrict abortions in the state to six weeks, before many women even know their pregnant.“The point for me, for this heartbeat bill, and all the pro-life legislation, is to save the unborn,” Ms Roegner told The Independent this week of the bill, which has been introduced in every legislative session in the state since at least 2011. “It’s to save innocent life.”The bill is one of eight in the US to be passed this year, following over 40 years' worth of incremental work to suppress abortions. And they have spurred a national reckoning over abortion rights, and led virtually every American who has much of an opinion on the issue to wonder: is this the end of Roe v Wade, the landmark Supreme Court case that made abortion a right for women across the US?As it turns out, it takes very little prodding for that goal to be made explicit.“The primary purpose is to save human life,” Ms Roegner said. “But we’re not going to shy away from it going to the Supreme Court with the intention of overturning Roe v Wade.”For supporters of abortion bans — including the Ohio bill and one recently signed law in Alabama, which would send physicians to prison for life for terminating a pregnancy at any stage — the strategy is pretty clear, and sets these red states on a direct collision course with the Supreme Court if all things go well.With Roe as the law of the land, the plan goes, each of these bills would run foul of the limits put in place by that ruling, which limits states from banning abortions if a foetus couldn’t survive outside of the womb. At six weeks, a foetus is the size of a sweet pea and is just beginning to form paddle-like hands and feet, but is nowhere near ready for the real world.So, far from banning abortion immediately, the laws that have been popping up across the country are intended to draw legal challenges, with the issue becoming more and more pressing for the nation’s higher court to make a decision as more states join the battle.State representative Terri Collins, who sponsored the bill in Alabama that would make virtually all abortions illegal, even in cases of rape or incest, confirmed that the Supreme Court is the point.“But what I’m trying to do here is get this case in front of the Supreme Court so Roe v Wade can be overturned,” she told the Washington Post, echoing a similar statements she has made to other media outlets.Since Roe v Wade was handed down in 1973, it is estimated that more than 54 million abortions have been performed in the United States alone.While abortion ban advocates describe that number as a mass slaughter — with the Alabama bill explicitly linking abortion to the Holocaust — many in the pro choice movement say the figure is not the point.One in four women are expected to have an abortion by the time they turn 45, according to the Guttmacher Institute, and the protections provided by Roe mean that those women have no reason to seek out the procedure in an unsafe condition. Instead, doctors and physicians are in the room, helping perform a procedure that was much more dangerous when it was done secretly fifty years ago.And, having the procedure in the realm of the legal means that there is no discrepancy in enforcement. While the bills banning abortion being passed across the country don’t mention the race or socioeconomic status of the women who might be targeted, it has been argued that abortions would disproportionately impact poor women and women of colour. That’s at least in part because judges and prosecutors in America often have a fair amount of discretion on sentencing guidelines, and that tends to benefit rich white folks.But, while Ms Roegner and Ms Collins may hope to force a new Supreme Court ruling — and might expect a favourable ruling, since Donald Trump has pushed the court to the right with the appointment of justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch — it is not clear that the court would actually take up the case.Plus, a challenge to Roe v Wade could come from anywhere, according to the deputy director of the American Civil Liberties Union Reproductive Freedom Project, Brigitte Amir.Ms Amir told Mother Jones that she doesn’t think these laws getting loads of press will be the end of Roe, even if they have that potential.“Any Supreme Court case that deals with abortion could be used to dismantle Roe v Wade,” she told the magazine.Which is to say that, much like the Ohio bill passed in April, the biggest challenge may not come with a bang. It may end with a whimper.

  • Boeing acknowledges flaw in 737 MAX simulator software
    Business
    AFP

    Boeing acknowledges flaw in 737 MAX simulator software

    Boeing acknowledged Saturday it had to correct flaws in its 737 MAX flight simulator software used to train pilots, after two deadly crashes involving the aircraft that killed 346 people. "Boeing has made corrections to the 737 MAX simulator software and has provided additional information to device operators to ensure that the simulator experience is representative across different flight conditions," it said in a statement. Its statement marked the first time Boeing acknowledged there was a design flaw in software linked to the 737 MAX, whose MCAS anti-stall software has been blamed in large part for the Ethiopian Airlines tragedy.

  • Democrat 2020 hopefuls eye coveted Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez endorsement
    Politics
    The Telegraph

    Democrat 2020 hopefuls eye coveted Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez endorsement

    She is the great young hope of America’s Left-wing, an articulate and impassioned progressive whose policies have gained traction and Twitter feed is followed by four million.  Now Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the 29-year-old first-time congressman from New York, is seeing her newfound political clout manifest in a new way – a race for her endorsement.  With two dozen Democrats seeking their party’s presidential nomination, the support of Ms Ocasio-Cortez is being seen as a way to win over the young, energised voters who will help shape the race.  Chief among the contenders are Bernie Sanders, the independent 77-year-old senator from Vermont, and Elizabeth Warren, the former academic now representing Massachusetts in the Senate.  Both have made tacit acknowledgement of Ms Ocasio-Cortez’s influence in public in recent weeks – whether for policy reasons, or for political gain, or both.  Earlier this month, Mr Sanders appeared alongside Ms Ocasio-Cortez at an office table where they discussed the importance of reducing credit card interest rates.  At the end of the 25-minute video, shared on social media and viewed by more than half a million people, the pair patted each other on the back warmly and smiled.  Last month, Mr Warren wrote a 180-word ode to Ms Ocasio-Cortez for Time Magazine when the latter was named in its top 100 most influential people.  “A year ago, she was taking orders across a bar. Today, millions are taking cues from her,” Ms Warren wrote of the congresswoman’s remarkable political rise. “And she’s just getting started.” Those two are not the only Democratic hopefuls vying for an endorsement, it appears. Politico reported that both senator Kirsten Gillibrand and former housing and urban development secretary Julian Castro have made “overtures”.  There is no reason a person should pay more than 15% interest in the United States. It’s common sense - in fact, we had these Usury laws until the 70s. It’s a debt trap for working people + it has to end.https://t.co/sO0p5NF7WR— Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@RepAOC) May 9, 2019 The enthusiasm is understandable. The Democratic Party’s progressive base appears fired up for change and many candidates hoping to win the right to take on Donald Trump are leaning its way.  Government-funded health care for all, a $15 minimum wage and bold action on climate change have been widely adopted by the field ahead of the first debate in June and the first primary vote next February.  Ms Ocasio-Cortez, who last year shocked the political establishment by ousting a 10-term Democrat in her own party to take his seat, has become the progressive movement’s most recognisable star.  That was underscored this week as Joe Biden, the former US vice president who is polling top and running on a centrist ticket, was forced to defend his climate change stance after Ms Ocasio-Cortez dismissed it as “middle of the road".  Elizabeth Warren, the Democratic senator for Massachusetts, has developed a reputation for standing up to Wall Street Credit: AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall Mr Sanders is best placed to win the endorsement race. Ms Ocasio-Cortez worked on his 2016 presidential campaign, identifies like him as a democratic socialist and shares many of the same policy beliefs.  Ms Warren has also laid out a left-wing platform taking on Wall Street and redistributing wealth but makes clear she remains a believer in capitalism.  Asked recently about an endorsement by a CNN reporter, Ms Ocasio-Cortez said: “What I would like to see in a presidential candidate is one that has a coherent worldview and logic from which all these policy proposals are coming forward. "I think senator Sanders has that. I also think senator Warren has that.” And, the questioner followed up, would she consider endorsing Mr Biden? Ms Ocasio-Cortez turned and walked away without a definitive answer.

  • Business
    Reuters

    Exclusive - U.S. may scale back Huawei trade restrictions to help existing customers

    The Commerce Department, which had effectively halted Huawei's ability to buy American-made parts and components, is considering issuing a temporary general license to "prevent the interruption of existing network operations and equipment," a spokeswoman said. Potential beneficiaries of the license could, for example, include internet access and mobile phone service providers in thinly populated places such as Wyoming and eastern Oregon that purchased network equipment from Huawei in recent years. In effect, the Commerce Department would allow Huawei to purchase U.S. goods so it can help existing customers maintain the reliability of networks and equipment, but the Chinese firm still would not be allowed to buy American parts and components to manufacture new products.

  • Cafeteria worker fired for giving student lunch won't return
    News
    Associated Press

    Cafeteria worker fired for giving student lunch won't return

    CANAAN, N.H. (AP) — A company has offered to rehire a New Hampshire school cafeteria worker whom it fired for giving a student lunch for free , but she isn't interested.

  • Glock 31 Gun: All You Need To Know About this Powerful Pistol
    News
    The National Interest

    Glock 31 Gun: All You Need To Know About this Powerful Pistol

    In the early 1990s, a handful of calibers emerged to challenge the nine-millimeter as the dominant semi-automatic handgun round. One of these, the .357 Sig, is the caliber of choice for the Glock 31 pistol. The Glock 31 is the company’s offering for those into high velocity or long distance handgun shooting. The G31 also comes with a large magazine capacity, making it an excellent self-defense or duty sidearm.The now infamous 1986 FBI Miami shootout was a watershed moment in the history of law enforcement. Eight FBI agents armed with pistols and shotguns engaged two bank robbers armed with superior weapons. Over the course of the gun battle, which saw the federal agents pinned down by suppressive fire from a Ruger Mini-14 semi-automatic rifle, two agents were killed and another five wounded. The two bank robbers were hit multiple times by incoming fire but were both able to continue shooting, contributing to the very high law enforcement casualty rate.In the aftermath of the shootout, the FBI and other government agencies began the search for a new, more powerful handgun round. Nine-millimeter and .38 Special proved ineffective at stopping the robbers, while .357 Magnum was a revolver cartridge that limited the user’s carrying capacity to six rounds at a time. Law enforcement wanted a powerful round that could be carried in large quantities.

  • Nearly 180 former Ohio State University students claim sexual abuse by doctor
    News
    Reuters

    Nearly 180 former Ohio State University students claim sexual abuse by doctor

    Dr. Richard Strauss was accused of abusing at least 177 male students when he worked as a physician for the university's athletic department and the student health center from 1978 to 1998, the report said, detailing the findings of a year-long independent investigation. Staff members knew of the abuse as early as 1979, but complaints were never elevated to administrators and senior officials of the athletics or student health departments until 1996. At that time, the school suspended and ultimately removed Strauss after a "very limited investigation" into a student's claim that the doctor fondled him during an exam, the report said.

  • NYC's Bill De Blasio Trades Criticism at Home for Curiosity in Iowa
    Politics
    Bloomberg

    NYC's Bill De Blasio Trades Criticism at Home for Curiosity in Iowa

    (Bloomberg) -- New York Mayor Bill de Blasio stepped away from the criticism in his hometown to engage curiosity in Iowa, making his first stop as a presidential candidate in the middle of farm country to demonstrate his interest in agricultural issues and take shots at President Donald Trump.

  • GOP Congressman Justin Amash’s Impeachment Call Boosts Pressure on Pelosi
    Politics
    The Daily Beast

    GOP Congressman Justin Amash’s Impeachment Call Boosts Pressure on Pelosi

    Kevin Lamarque/ReutersRepublican congressman Justin Amash’s support for impeachment proceedings against President Trump ratchets up the pressure on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to call for the same. Citing “multiple examples of conduct satisfying all the elements of obstruction of justice” uncovered in the Mueller report, the iconoclastic Michigan lawmaker spared no one in a lengthy Twitter thread on Saturday—calling out Trump, Attorney General William Barr, and other lawmakers he says put partisanship above their own allegiance to the Constitution. Many were quick to wonder aloud why it was a Republican lawmaker making the case for impeachment rather than top Democrat Pelosi, who has called Trump “unfit” for the presidency but come out against impeachment, saying it’d be too “divisive” for the country. “Conservative Republican Justin Amash is more principled and forward-leaning on impeachment than Pelosi, Nadler, Neal, and any of the other House Dem leaders right now. Will they wake up?” tweeted Ezra Levin, a former Capitol Hill staffer and co-founder of Indivisible, a movement fighting to “resist the Trump agenda.” Neither Pelosi nor Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer immediately responded to Amash’s argument for impeachment. But at least one Democratic lawmaker appeared to heed his call.“Come find me in 1628 Longworth. I’ve got an impeachment investigation resolution you’re going to want to cosponsor,” Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) tweeted at Amash late Saturday. Reactions from within his own party weren’t quite as encouraging. “It’s sad to see Congressman Amash parroting the Democrats’ talking points on Russia,” RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel said in a statement. “The only people still fixated on the Russia collusion hoax are political foes of President Trump hoping to defeat him in 2020 by any desperate means possible.”Pelosi has repeatedly suggested impeachment proceedings would be likely to backfire, suggesting in early March that Trump actually wants to face impeachment to rile up his base. Earlier this week at an event hosted by the Georgetown University Law Center, she said she doesn’t “want to impeach” even though in her opinion, Trump is giving more “grounds for impeachment” with every passing day by ignoring subpoenas issued by House Democrats. “I believe that we are headed toward an impeachment inquiry,” Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin, a member of the House Judiciary Committee, told MSNBC earlier Saturday, saying “the anger and frustration is growing.” In making his case for impeachment, Amash argued that “extreme partisanship” had blinded Congress to the true purpose of impeachment: to “deter misconduct” and get rid of any official who “has engaged in careless, abusive, corrupt, or otherwise dishonorable conduct.”Trump did not necessarily have to be found guilty of a crime in order to face impeachment, he said. “Under our Constitution, the president ‘shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.” While 'high Crimes and Misdemeanors' is not defined, the context implies conduct that violates the public trust.” “Attorney General Barr has deliberately misrepresented Mueller’s report,” Amash said, adding that Barr’s testimony on the report—in which he repeatedly defended Trump’s conduct—made it clear he “intended to mislead the public about Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s analysis and findings.” Those findings, he argued, did not clear Trump of wrongdoing as Barr has claimed but revealed “that President Trump engaged in specific actions and a pattern of behavior that meet the threshold for impeachment.”While Mueller did not establish a conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia, he did not make any determinations on obstruction of justice, choosing instead to leave that matter up to Congress. But Amash argues that many members of Congress didn't even bother to read Mueller's report. “Their minds were made up based on partisan affiliation—and it showed, with representatives and senators from both parties issuing definitive statements on the 448-page report’s conclusions within just hours of its release,” he wrote. “America’s institutions depend on officials to uphold both the rules and spirit of our constitutional system even when to do so is personally inconvenient or yields a politically unfavorable outcome. Our Constitution is brilliant and awesome; it deserves a government to match it,” he said. Amash, who identifies as a libertarian, has previously voiced a desire to see a third party challenge Democrats and Republicans in politics and in March said he wouldn’t “rule out” a 2020 run himself. Meanwhile, his break with the GOP over impeachment could put a big target on his back. A Michigan state lawmaker hinted on Saturday that he might challenge Amash in a primary.Amash has raised the prospect of Trump facing impeachment before. In early 2017, when former FBI director James Comey first accused Trump of asking him to stop an investigation into former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, Amash said such a move would be grounds for impeachment. “But everybody gets a fair trial in this country,” he said at the time. Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

  • Women shouldn't have to tell abortion stories to remind lawmakers they're human
    News
    The Guardian

    Women shouldn't have to tell abortion stories to remind lawmakers they're human

    YouKnowMe is both powerful and profoundly depressing – women shouldn’t have to justify wanting bodily autonomyBusy Philipps started the YouKnowMe campaign. Photograph: WWD/Rex/ShutterstockSign up for the Week in Patriarchy, a newsletter​ on feminism and sexism sent every Saturday. YouKnowMe: powerful but also profoundly depressingIt has been another terrible week for reproductive rights in America: Alabama outlawed abortion, and Missouri has passed a bill banning abortion after eight weeks. Emboldened by Trump, the right has ramped up its war on abortion, and there is a very real chance Roe v Wade will eventually be overturned.It’s not just anti-abortion activists who are organizing, however. Women’s rights groups are seeing record donations and unprecedented levels of energy, as activists fight to protect a woman’s right to control her own body. The regressive new laws have also sparked a viral social media campaign, with thousands of women sharing their abortion experiences with the hashtag YouKnowMe.The YouKnowMe campaign was started by the actor and talkshow host Busy Philipps, with the intent of getting rid of the shame that still surrounds abortion. “1 in 4 women have had an abortion,” Philipps tweeted on Wednesday. “Many people think they don’t know someone who has, but youknowme. So let’s do this: if you are also the 1 in 4, let’s share it and start to end the shame. Use youknowme and share your truth.”Huge numbers of women (and trans-men) have joined in, including a number of celebrities. Cynthia Nixon, for example, tweeted: “Almost 60 years ago, my mother had an illegal abortion. It was too harrowing for her to discuss, but she made sure I knew it had happened. In 2010, my wife had a legal abortion after we found out her pregnancy was not viable. We cannot and will not go back.”Hashtag activism has traditionally prompted a lot of sneering, but as MeToo has demonstrated, online discussion can catalyze real world change. The YouKnowMe stories people are sharing make the political deeply personal. They paint a powerful picture of the different reasons people get abortions – some are traumatic, some are mundane, but none is more valid than another.YouKnowMe also seizes control of the narrative around abortion. Anti-abortion activists have embedded shame and blame into the language we use to talk about the issue, describing themselves as “pro-life”. The real-life stories women are sharing with YouKnowMe are a reminder that there is nothing pro-life about the people who would restrict a woman’s right to choose; they are simply pro-control.While YouKnowMe is powerful, it’s also profoundly depressing. Women shouldn’t have to publicly defend their humanity. They shouldn’t have to justify wanting bodily autonomy.They shouldn’t have to broadcast their personal stories in order to remind legislators that they’re not just baby-carrying vessels; they are human beings. ‘Break the girls’Women were at the forefront of the mass protests that recently ended Omar al-Bashir’s decades-long rule over Sudan, accounting for 70% of demonstrators according to some estimates. CNN has a chilling piece on how the Bashir regime tried to use rape to silence these women. “Break the girls, because if you break the girls, you break the men,” soldiers were told. The women did not break. More male managers afraid of interacting with womenMeToo has made men afraid of interacting with women at work, according to new research by LeanIn.Org and SurveyMonkey. Sixty percent of male managers said they were uncomfortable mentoring, socializing, and having one-on-one meetings with women, up 14% from last year. Almost half of male managers said they were uncomfortable socializing with female colleagues outside the office, and more than a third actively took steps to avoid such interactions. 33 women now lead Fortune 500 companiesThat’s up from 32 in 2017 and 24 in 2018. While the figure is a record high, it’s pretty dismal that only 6.6% of Fortune 500 CEOs are women.There is a double standard around drinking and women. Photograph: Andrew Burton/Getty Images Drinking and dehumanizationNew research published in the journal Sex Roles has found that women drinking alcohol are viewed as “less human” and more sexually available. It’s a troubling reminder of the double standards around drinking, and the way in which alcohol is used to blame women for sexual assault, and exonerate men. Lesbian Batwoman to the rescueIt’s been a pretty depressing week, so I think we could all do with some Sapphic superhero news. CW has unveiled the first trailer for its new Batwoman series, starring Ruby Rose. An openly LGBT actor playing an openly gay superhero is a TV first, and a small sign of progress. Dogs are a woman’s best friendAccording to a new study, dogs are more likely to obey women than men. This is apparently because women are more empathetic. I have no idea how scientifically sound this research is, but I think we can all agree that dogs are very good boys.

  • World
    Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Argentina grants offshore oil, gas exploration permits in Malvinas West basin

    Argentina awarded permits for hydrocarbon exploration in 18 areas off its southern coast to companies including Exxon Mobil Corp, Total SA , YPF SA and Royal Dutch Shell Plc, the government said on Friday. The winning companies offered bids totaling $724 million, the government said in official statements, and won the rights to explore for up to 13 years in areas of the South Atlantic, some near the Malvinas Islands under the control of the British government but whose sovereignty is claimed by Argentina. The other companies that will make up exploration consortia in Argentina's Malvinas West basin include BP, Qatar Petroleum, Tullow Oil, Pluspetrol , Wintershall, Equinor, Eni , Mitsui &Co Ltd and Tecpetrol SA.

  • Thomas Cook shares collapses on broker warning
    Business
    AFP

    Thomas Cook shares collapses on broker warning

    Shares in troubled British tour operator Thomas Cook collapsed on Friday after Citigroup reportedly warned in a broker note that the stock was worthless. The company's share price dived 27.26 percent to just 14.26 pence in midday deals on the London stock market. "Thomas Cook shares have plunged again, this time after being on the receiving end of a sell recommendation from Citigroup, with a zero pence target price," said analyst Michael Hewson at traders CMC Markets UK.

  • I.M. Pei's legacy stretched from the West to the East
    Lifestyle
    Associated Press

    I.M. Pei's legacy stretched from the West to the East

    BEIJING (AP) — The legacy of American architect I.M. Pei stretches from west to east, from the Louvre museum to his native China, where he helped fuse tradition and modernity as the country opened up after the Cultural Revolution.