• AP sources: Former CIA chief Brennan to brief Dems on Iran
    Politics
    Associated Press

    AP sources: Former CIA chief Brennan to brief Dems on Iran

    WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats will hear from former CIA Director John Brennan about the situation in Iran, inviting him to speak next week amid heightened concerns over the Trump administration's sudden moves in the region.

  • Boeing acknowledges flaw in 737 MAX simulator software
    Business
    AFP

    Boeing acknowledges flaw in 737 MAX simulator software

    Boeing acknowledged Saturday it had to correct flaws in its 737 MAX flight simulator software used to train pilots, after two deadly crashes involving the aircraft that killed 346 people. "Boeing has made corrections to the 737 MAX simulator software and has provided additional information to device operators to ensure that the simulator experience is representative across different flight conditions," it said in a statement. Its statement marked the first time Boeing acknowledged there was a design flaw in software linked to the 737 MAX, whose MCAS anti-stall software has been blamed in large part for the Ethiopian Airlines tragedy.

  • Democrat 2020 hopefuls eye coveted Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez endorsement
    Politics
    The Telegraph

    Democrat 2020 hopefuls eye coveted Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez endorsement

    She is the great young hope of America’s Left-wing, an articulate and impassioned progressive whose policies have gained traction and Twitter feed is followed by four million.  Now Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the 29-year-old first-time congressman from New York, is seeing her newfound political clout manifest in a new way – a race for her endorsement.  With two dozen Democrats seeking their party’s presidential nomination, the support of Ms Ocasio-Cortez is being seen as a way to win over the young, energised voters who will help shape the race.  Chief among the contenders are Bernie Sanders, the independent 77-year-old senator from Vermont, and Elizabeth Warren, the former academic now representing Massachusetts in the Senate.  Both have made tacit acknowledgement of Ms Ocasio-Cortez’s influence in public in recent weeks – whether for policy reasons, or for political gain, or both.  Earlier this month, Mr Sanders appeared alongside Ms Ocasio-Cortez at an office table where they discussed the importance of reducing credit card interest rates.  At the end of the 25-minute video, shared on social media and viewed by more than half a million people, the pair patted each other on the back warmly and smiled.  Last month, Mr Warren wrote a 180-word ode to Ms Ocasio-Cortez for Time Magazine when the latter was named in its top 100 most influential people.  “A year ago, she was taking orders across a bar. Today, millions are taking cues from her,” Ms Warren wrote of the congresswoman’s remarkable political rise. “And she’s just getting started.” Those two are not the only Democratic hopefuls vying for an endorsement, it appears. Politico reported that both senator Kirsten Gillibrand and former housing and urban development secretary Julian Castro have made “overtures”.  There is no reason a person should pay more than 15% interest in the United States. It’s common sense - in fact, we had these Usury laws until the 70s. It’s a debt trap for working people + it has to end.https://t.co/sO0p5NF7WR— Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@RepAOC) May 9, 2019 The enthusiasm is understandable. The Democratic Party’s progressive base appears fired up for change and many candidates hoping to win the right to take on Donald Trump are leaning its way.  Government-funded health care for all, a $15 minimum wage and bold action on climate change have been widely adopted by the field ahead of the first debate in June and the first primary vote next February.  Ms Ocasio-Cortez, who last year shocked the political establishment by ousting a 10-term Democrat in her own party to take his seat, has become the progressive movement’s most recognisable star.  That was underscored this week as Joe Biden, the former US vice president who is polling top and running on a centrist ticket, was forced to defend his climate change stance after Ms Ocasio-Cortez dismissed it as “middle of the road".  Elizabeth Warren, the Democratic senator for Massachusetts, has developed a reputation for standing up to Wall Street Credit: AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall Mr Sanders is best placed to win the endorsement race. Ms Ocasio-Cortez worked on his 2016 presidential campaign, identifies like him as a democratic socialist and shares many of the same policy beliefs.  Ms Warren has also laid out a left-wing platform taking on Wall Street and redistributing wealth but makes clear she remains a believer in capitalism.  Asked recently about an endorsement by a CNN reporter, Ms Ocasio-Cortez said: “What I would like to see in a presidential candidate is one that has a coherent worldview and logic from which all these policy proposals are coming forward. "I think senator Sanders has that. I also think senator Warren has that.” And, the questioner followed up, would she consider endorsing Mr Biden? Ms Ocasio-Cortez turned and walked away without a definitive answer.

  • Politics
    USA TODAY Opinion

    Roe v. Wade gave women a right to choose abortion. But doctors like me have a choice, too.

    As a doctor, I'm not there to carry out the will of either the state or the individual, but to do what I see as in keeping with my medical role.

  • Swiss Set to Back Tax Reform, Gun Control in Sunday Referendums
    World
    Bloomberg

    Swiss Set to Back Tax Reform, Gun Control in Sunday Referendums

    The new tax regime would replace special tax breaks that multinational companies now enjoy but which Switzerland is forced to do away with to comply with international rules. While Switzerland isn’t a member of the EU, it is in the open-border Schengen area and therefore the law needs to be changed in accordance with stricter rules in the bloc. Both measures are up for a vote because of Switzerland’s system of direct democracy which calls for mandatory referendums if 50,000 votes are collected within 100 days of a law passing.

  • First Republican lawmaker says Trump engaged in impeachable conduct
    Politics
    Reuters

    First Republican lawmaker says Trump engaged in impeachable conduct

    Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report on the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election reveals that Trump "engaged in specific actions and a pattern of behavior that meet the threshold for impeachment," Amash, who has signaled he would consider running as a libertarian against Trump in the 2020 election, wrote on Twitter. Mueller's report "identifies multiple examples of conduct satisfying all the elements of obstruction of justice, and undoubtedly any person who is not the president of the United States would be indicted based on such evidence," Amash wrote. Trump has said Mueller's report concluded there no obstruction of justice.

  • Illinois not alerted to early clues in womb-cutting case
    News
    Associated Press

    Illinois not alerted to early clues in womb-cutting case

    CHICAGO (AP) — Police and Illinois' child welfare agency say staff at a Chicago-area hospital didn't alert them after determining that a bloodied woman who arrived with a gravely ill newborn had not just given birth to the baby boy, as she claimed.

  • Blast hits Egypt tourist bus, 17 injured: security, medical sources
    World
    AFP

    Blast hits Egypt tourist bus, 17 injured: security, medical sources

    An explosion struck a tourist bus on Sunday near Egypt's famed pyramids, injuring 17 people including foreigners, security and medical sources said. South Africans and Egyptians were among those injured when an explosive device went off, hitting the bus in Giza, according to the sources. Sunday's incident comes after three Vietnamese holidaymakers and their Egyptian guide were killed when a roadside bomb hit their bus as it travelled near the pyramids outside Cairo in December.

  • Saudi Arabia warns Iran it will respond ‘with all strength to attacks’ as US increases Gulf patrols
    World
    The Independent

    Saudi Arabia warns Iran it will respond ‘with all strength to attacks’ as US increases Gulf patrols

    Saudi Arabia has said it does not want war but stands ready to respond with “all strength” to defend itself against Iran, as the US stepped up naval exercises in the Persian Gulf.The Saudis, who have accused Tehran of ordering drone strikes five days ago on two of its oil pumping stations, told Iran the kingdom would not stand by while being attacked.Saudi Arabia and Shi’ite Iran are arch-adversaries in the Middle East, backing opposite sides in several regional wars.“The kingdom of Saudi Arabia does not want war in the region and does not seek that... but at the same time, if the other side chooses war, the kingdom will fight this with all force and determination and it will defend itself, its citizens and its interests,” foreign minister Adel al-Jubeir said. “We want peace and stability in the region but we won’t stand with our hands bound as the Iranians continuously attack. Iran has to understand that.“The ball is in Iran’s court and it is up to Iran to determine what its fate will be.”Saudi Arabia would do what it could “to prevent this war”, he said.An Iranian military commander was similarly quoted as saying his country is not looking for war. Fears of armed conflict have run high after the White House ordered warships and bombers to the Arabian Gulf earlier this month to counter an alleged, unexplained threat from Iran. The US also has ordered non-essential staff out of diplomatic posts in Iraq. An aircraft carrier strike group with the US Navy has stepped up security patrols in the international waters after an alleged act of sabotage on four vessels, including two Saudi oil tankers, off the United Arab Emirates.Days earlier, Iran-allied Yemeni rebels claimed a drone attack on a Saudi oil pipeline. Iran has denied involvement in either operation.The tensions are rooted in Donald Trump’s decision last year to withdraw the US from the 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and world powers, and impose wide-reaching sanctions, including on Iranian oil exports that are crucial to its economy. Iran has said it will resume enriching uranium at higher levels if a new deal is not reached by 7 July. That could potentially bring it closer to being able to develop a nuclear weapon. Saudi Arabia’s Sunni Muslim ally the UAE has not blamed anyone for the tanker sabotage, but two US government sources said US officials believed Iran had encouraged Yemen’s Iran-aligned Houthi group or Iraq-based Shi’ite militias to carry it out.The Houthis have been battling a Saudi-led military coalition Yemen’s war since 2015.An English-language Saudi newspaper close to the palace recently published an editorial calling for surgical US airstrikes in retaliation for Iran’s alleged involvement in the oil attacks. Agencies contributed to this report

  • This Missile Might be the U.S. Navy's Important Weapon in Decades
    World
    The National Interest

    This Missile Might be the U.S. Navy's Important Weapon in Decades

    The Tomahawk and its controversies might make headlines, but as the U.S. Navy re-arms for high-tech warfare, the SM-6 is the missile to watch.The U.S. Navy in late January 2019 confirmed the designation of its newest cruise missile, in the process clarifying its long-term plan for arming its growing fleet of warships.The plan heavily leans on one missile, in particular. It's the SM-6, an anti-aircraft weapon that quickly is evolving to perform almost every role the Navy assigns to a missile.(This first appeared earlier in the year.)The Navy dubbed the newest version of the venerable Tomahawk cruise missile the "Block V" model, Jane's reported. There are two separate variants of the Block V missile, one with an anti-ship warhead and another with a warhead the Navy optimized for striking targets on land.Raytheon's Tomahawk has been the subject of controversy in Washington, D.C. In order to save money the Obama administration wanted to pause production of the long-range missile, which since the 1980s has been the Navy's main weapon for striking land targets from the sea.Congress overruled the Obama administration and continued buying Tomahawks for roughly $1 million apiece, adding potentially hundreds of the missiles to the thousands the fleet already possesses.

  • Wild video shows the moment an F-16 fighter jet crashed into a California warehouse
    News
    BGR News

    Wild video shows the moment an F-16 fighter jet crashed into a California warehouse

    In a wild story that was captured on video, an F-16 fighter jet crashed into a warehouse in Riverside, California shortly after takeoff yesterday afternoon. The pilot managed to safely eject from the plane before the crash and is said to have suffered no injuries, according to a report from the Los Angeles Times.A full-on investigation into the cause of the crash will certainly yield more details, but early reports suggest that a hydraulics failure was the reason behind the malfunction and subsequent crash.Video of the impact was captured by a nearby car's dashboard cam. Ty Stanonis was on the freeway when the crash occurred ahead of him, he told FOX11. His vehicle's dashboard camera recorded the moment the jet crashed, showing the plane dropping into the building. "Everybody was slowing down, just trying to figure out what just happened," Stanonis said. The pilot's parachute deployed after he ejected, and he landed in a field inside the base. Stanonis said the pilot was still for a few moments but finally rose to his feet.The moment of impact can be seen in the first few seconds of the video below.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9j4dzuttA1wFootage captured from within the warehouse can be seen below. It's worth noting that the video contains explicit language.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ho35RgfUfIMiraculously, no one in the warehouse was seriously injured as a result of the crash, though a few individuals were taken to a nearby hospital for evaluation for minor injuries.Further, the F-16 was said to be carrying live ammunition which thankfully -- and remarkably -- did not go off. All in all, what could have been an all-out disaster resulted in no deaths or serious injuries

  • Donald Trump says he is in favour of abortion laws with exceptions for rape and incest
    News
    The Telegraph

    Donald Trump says he is in favour of abortion laws with exceptions for rape and incest

    President Donald Trump on Saturday declared himself "strongly Pro-Life" but in favor of exceptions for pregnancies resulting from rape or incest, after several US states passed tough new restrictions on abortions. The US president spelled out his position on abortion, set to be a hot-button issue at next year's election, days after Alabama's governor signed the country's most restrictive law - enacting a near-total prohibition even in cases of rape and incest. "As most people know, and for those who would like to know, I am strongly Pro-Life, with the three exceptions - Rape, Incest and protecting the Life of the mother - the same position taken by Ronald Reagan," tweeted Trump. Trump, a bombastic, twice-divorced billionaire, won over the evangelical vote during his 2016 campaign by promising to appoint anti-abortion justices at the Supreme Court. He has since brought two conservative appointees to the highest court in the land - Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh - shifting the balance of the nine-person bench. American evangelicals now have high hopes that the court will chip away at its historic 1973 US decision to legalize abortion. In addition to Alabama, the Missouri legislature this week made abortions illegal from eight weeks of pregnancy. Georgia, Ohio, Mississippi, Kentucky, Iowa and North Dakota have enacted laws banning abortion from the moment a fetal heartbeat is detected. The bans are expected to be blocked in court, but supporters plan to appeal such decisions until they reach the Supreme Court, in hopes this will lead to the long-sought conservative goal of overturning the abortion ruling, known as Roe v Wade. Roe v Wade guarantees women's rights to abortion as long as the fetus is not viable - around 24 weeks of pregnancy. Trump has also called for a congressional ban on late-term abortions, as he seeks to expand on his conservative support ahead of his re-election bid. "The Radical Left, with late term abortion (and worse), is imploding on this issue," he tweeted late Saturday. "We must stick together and Win for Life in 2020."

  • View Photos of the First Hot Wheels Toy Based on a Fan's Custom Car
    Lifestyle
    Car and Driver

    View Photos of the First Hot Wheels Toy Based on a Fan's Custom Car

    A flame-throwing, 600-hp ground-bound jet from Jersey is cool enough-then they up and made a toy version.From Car and Driver

  • Business
    Reuters

    Exclusive - U.S. may scale back Huawei trade restrictions to help existing customers

    The Commerce Department, which had effectively halted Huawei's ability to buy American-made parts and components, is considering issuing a temporary general license to "prevent the interruption of existing network operations and equipment," a spokeswoman said. Potential beneficiaries of the license could, for example, include internet access and mobile phone service providers in thinly populated places such as Wyoming and eastern Oregon that purchased network equipment from Huawei in recent years. In effect, the Commerce Department would allow Huawei to purchase U.S. goods so it can help existing customers maintain the reliability of networks and equipment, but the Chinese firm still would not be allowed to buy American parts and components to manufacture new products.

  • World
    Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Argentina grants offshore oil, gas exploration permits in Malvinas West basin

    Argentina awarded permits for hydrocarbon exploration in 18 areas off its southern coast to companies including Exxon Mobil Corp, Total SA , YPF SA and Royal Dutch Shell Plc, the government said on Friday. The winning companies offered bids totaling $724 million, the government said in official statements, and won the rights to explore for up to 13 years in areas of the South Atlantic, some near the Malvinas Islands under the control of the British government but whose sovereignty is claimed by Argentina. The other companies that will make up exploration consortia in Argentina's Malvinas West basin include BP, Qatar Petroleum, Tullow Oil, Pluspetrol , Wintershall, Equinor, Eni , Mitsui &Co Ltd and Tecpetrol SA.

  • Rocket attack hits near US Embassy in Baghdad's Green Zone
    World
    Associated Press

    Rocket attack hits near US Embassy in Baghdad's Green Zone

    BAGHDAD (AP) — A rocket was fired into the Iraqi capital's heavily fortified Green Zone Sunday night, landing less than a mile from the sprawling U.S. Embassy, an Iraqi military spokesman said.

  • SAT to give students 'adversity score'
    U.S.
    FOX News Videos

    SAT to give students 'adversity score'

    Students will now be given an 'adversity score' to show challenges they have overcome based on their environment.

  • US pilots warned about flying over Iranian territory amid rising tensions in Middle East
    World
    The Independent

    US pilots warned about flying over Iranian territory amid rising tensions in Middle East

    US airlines have been warned by diplomats that their planes face a risk of being “misidentified” as they fly over the Gulf amid heightened tensions between America and Iran, A notice from the Federal Aviation Association (FAA) published on 16 May underlined the risks the tensions pose to a region crucial to global air travel.The guidance warned US pilots to be cautious in flying over the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, as there is “heightened military activities and increased political tension” between the two states.Washington has dispatched naval warships and bombers to the region in an attempt to protect American interests, diplomats, and forces from what it called Iranian aggression. The FAA warning only applies to US registered aircraft, pilots, and US carriers. The UK is understood not to have issued a similar warning.The warning stated that tensions may “present an increasing inadvertent risk to US civil aviation operations due to the potential for miscalculation or misidentification".The FAA also warned of potential GPS interference and communications jamming in the area, which they say may occur with “little to no warning”.The region is home to major hub airports, including Dubai International, the busiest international airport in the world.

  • Let Me Tell You About the Worst Submarine of All Time
    World
    The National Interest

    Let Me Tell You About the Worst Submarine of All Time

    For the Worst Submarine of All Time, I go further and nominate an entire silent service: the undersea arm of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN).There are many candidates for this dubious honor. After all, submarining has been around for well over a century now. Many ships render honorable but unexceptional service. Standouts emerge, generally in times of strife, as do “floating coffins” and plain old hard-luck ships.And there are some that subtract value from the nation’s effort to reach its strategic and political aims. This is the unpardonable sin.The idea of ships that could submerge has been around since antiquity. Combat submersibles date to the Turtle, a hand-propelled contraption built to smite Royal Navy ships from beneath during the War of American Independence. But subs really became a going concern during the fin de siècle age, when propulsion technologies such as batteries, electric motors, and internal-combustion engines came to maturity around the same time.Combining these technologies yielded the diesel-electric propulsion plant, a hybrid affair that enabled subs to run silent, run deep on quiet electric motors when submerged and run on diesels and recharge batteries while cruising the surface. At the direction of First Sea Lord Jacky Fisher, the Royal Navy ordered five rudimentary boats designed by John Phillip Holland in 1900, and the age of modern undersea warfare was on.

  • Al Jazeera suspends two journalists over Holocaust report
    World
    AFP

    Al Jazeera suspends two journalists over Holocaust report

    Qatari state-funded broadcaster Al Jazeera suspended two journalists on Sunday over a video they produced claiming the extent of the Holocaust was being misrepresented by Jews. The clip, posted by Al Jazeera's online AJ+ Arabic service, claimed "the narrative" that the Nazis killed six million Jews was "adopted by the Zionist movement". The video said that "along with others, the Jews faced a policy of systematic persecution which culminated in the Final Solution".

  • Democratic Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards prepares to sign restrictive abortion bill
    Politics
    USA TODAY

    Democratic Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards prepares to sign restrictive abortion bill

    "My inclination is to sign it," Gov. John Bel Edwards said when discussing a "heartbeat bill" currently under consideration in the state Legislature.

  • Game of Thrones season 8 episode 6: what time does the finale start tonight, episode run time and latest news
    Entertainment
    The Telegraph

    Game of Thrones season 8 episode 6: what time does the finale start tonight, episode run time and latest news

    We had a long time to wait since the penultimate season of Game of Thrones came to an end, zombie dragon and all. Now – in just five weeks – the hit fantasy epic has come back into our lives, reunited long lost characters, killed off some of our favourites (and least so), and toyed with our emotions like never before.  The countdown the final episode is almost over (although, we're still not quite sure if we're ready for what's to come after witnessing the game-changing massacre of  The Bells) and we are guaranteed an absolute spectacle. With just one episode to go until the final credits roll, it's safe to say the last scenes are set be the best of the monumental show's best. Throughout season 8 we've already seen the grisliest (and most squint-worthy) battle in the TV series' history, Daenerys' slow but sure tumble into madness, and the shocking death of Night King (you can read our review of the Battle of Winterfell here).  Dear Lord of Light, we better prepare ourselves... What time is season 8 episode 6 on? The finale of Game of Thrones season eight will air on Sunday 19 May on HBO at 9pm Eastern time in America, while UK fans can tune into the simulcast at 2am on Sky Atlantic in the early hours of Monday morning. The replay can be seen at the more reasonable and sleep-friendly time of 9pm on Monday 20 May (but be prepared to avoid a stream of surefire spoilers throughout the day!). How long will the finale episode be? While the eighth season only has six episodes, some of them are much longer than the one-hour slot they’ve filled in previous seasons. The first couple of episodes, however, were disappointingly short:  Episode 1: 54 minutes Episode 2: 58 minutes Episode 3: 82 minutes Episode 4: 78 minutes Episode 5: 79 minutes Episode 6: 79 minutes As noted by Winter Is Coming, the first episode was also the only one without an ‘Adult Content’ warning. In a crushing blow for Thrones fans, however, HBO head of programming Casey Bloys has hinted there could be another agonising wait between the end of Game of Thrones and the beginning of the first spin-off show, saying “you’re not going to see anything air anytime close to the season 8 finale.” The Raven newsletter in-article What was the budget for season 8? Reports suggest season 8 of Game of Thrones cost HBO over $90 million (£69 million) -  making the show the most expensive TV series of all time, even though season 8 has the fewest number of episodes since its inception. With roughly $15 million (£11 million) to spend on each episode, it's no surprise we've seen dragons, direwolves and Night King-induced death unlike ever before. Who is in the cast of the final series? All the main cast members have returned for the final series. As this is Game of Thrones, however, we can’t be sure who will survive until the very end. The Battle of Winterfell shocked us all when every one of our favourite characters came into danger of the Night King. After the loss of Eddison Tollett, Beric Dondarrion, Theon Greyjoy and Lyanna Mormont - who we must mention, all died a hero saving a fellow character - we can only feel nervous about what's to come in the Last War. Although it is an ensemble show, the cast’s salaries could indicate which characters will be given the most prominence in the final season: in 2017, Variety reported that five cast members —  Peter Dinklage (Tyrion), Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (Jaime), Lena Headey (Cersei), Emilia Clarke (Daenerys) and Kit Harington (Jon Snow) — were all being paid $500,000 (roughly £380,000) per episode. Other returning cast members have included Liam Cunningham (Davos), Sophie Turner (Sansa), Maisie Williams (Arya), Nathalie Emmanuel (Missandei) and Gwendoline Christie (Brienne). Ghost, Jon Snow's faithful albino direwolf, has also made a return to the final season. Read our complete guide to all of the cast in Game of Thrones. Game of Thrones: 50 things you didn't know What happened at the season 8 premiere? The cast premiered the first episode of the final season in New York in early April - albeit with some rather strict, Littlefinger-fated allusions for anyone who dared to leak major plot spoilers. Aside from the epic opener of the new season - including Jon Snow finding out his true identity - the premiere was filled with glamorous outfits and sweet reunions between the cast. Take a look at the best photos from the Game of Thrones season 8 premiere here. Latest Game of Thrones trailer Episode three, The Long Night, wasn't only the longest episode in the show's history, but the most epic, most grisly and most shocking. We all thought, surely, Game of Thrones can't possibly top an episode like the Battle of Winterfell?  Then, in the episode five, The Bells, The Last War happened and Daenerys burned Kinds Landing to smithereens. After watching the trailer for the finale - in true GoT style - we know nothing. We can only hope one of the few deserving Westerosi ends up on the Iron Throne and Mad Queen Daenerys gets added to Arya's kill list. Who is directing season 8? Collider revealed David Nutter (who directed the infamous Red Wedding episode, The Rains of Castamere) will be directing episodes one, two and four. Miguel Sapochnik, who’s become known for action-heavy episodes such as Hardhome and Battle of the Bastards, will be directing episodes three and five. Showrunners DB Weiss and David Benioff will co-direct the sixth and final episode of the show.  Who has written season 8? The final series will keep the show’s four-man writing team of DB Weiss, David Benioff, Dave Hill and Brian Cogman. Although George RR Martin was a guest writer for a few episodes in the show’s first four seasons, he will not return for season eight. Hill wrote the season premiere, Cogman wrote the second episode, and Benioff and Weiss have shared the remaining four episodes between them. Where can I watch Season 8? Season 8 of Game of Thrones has been airing weekly on Sky and NOW TV. If you want to catch up on seasons 1-8 while you wait for the finale, you can watch it on NOW TV right now with a 7 day free Entertainment Pass trial and if you want to relive your favourite moments, read our round up of the best Game of Thrones episodes of all time. Find out everything you need to know about watching Game of Thrones in the UK. What will happen in the Season 8 finale? Episodes 1-5 left us with some burning questions...  Credit: HBO We've been on an endless shock stream throughout season eight and, with just over an hour left, we are left with more questions about Game of Thrones than ever before. Who will sit on the Iron Throne? Will Jon Snow have to kill Daenerys? What did the Night King want with Bran Stark? Our best hope would be a leaked script or two and, according to Entertainment Weekly, showrunners DB Weiss and David Benioff were already writing scripts for the final season during post-production on season seven. It’s not impossible, despite HBO’s careful attempts to keep things under wraps.  In November 2016 an anonymous Reddit user leaked details of the entire plot of season seven in a post which has since proven to be largely accurate (one spoiler, for instance, predicted that Viserion would be killed and revived by the Night King). If it happened once, it could happen again. The cast have also dropped hints that the ending will be divisive, to say the least.   “To be able to act out the way that it all ends, it was really satisfying for us,” Sophie Turner, who plays Sansa Stark, told IGN.  “Who knows if it will be satisfying for the fans? I think a lot of fans will be disappointed and a lot of fans will be over the moon, I think.” GOT What happens next no-reg Further information has been released throughout the slow lead up to the finale. Weiss and Benioff  revealed that season 8 would open with Daenerys and her army arriving in Winterfell - and she did.  We also already knew the series' final major battle episode would be the long-awaited showdown between the Army of the Dead at Winterfell.  “It’s brutal,” Peter Dinklage, who plays Tyrion Lannister, told Entertainment Weekly. “It makes the Battle of the Bastards look like a theme park.” Emmy winning director Miguel Sapochnik, who directed the infamous season 6 episode Battle of the Bastards, directed the episode in question and the final battle reportedly took 55 days to shoot (with Sapochnik spending additional weeks on a sound stage).    Generally, the climactic episode of each Game of Thrones season is the penultimate episode; we’ve seen with episodes The Rains of Castamere, Battle of the Bastards and Beyond the Wall. As intense as it was, it certainly wasn't a chapter finisher. With this in mind, the events of the final episode are completely up in the air.  What do fans think will happen in Season 8? There have been some particularly inventive fan theories about what to expect from the final series, ranging from the mostly plausible to the downright silly. Some of the more interesting ideas include: that Tyrion Lannister might turn out to be a member of the Targaryen line (as the illegitimate son of Mad King Aerys), and the idea that Bran Stark will (through a mystical, as-yet-unexplained McGuffin) turn out to be the Night King. Difficult, of course, as he didn't die in tandem with the icy warlord, but not implausible considering the Seven Kingdoms' relationship with magic. When asked about the latter theory Isaac Hempstead, the actor who plays Bran, told Esquire he thought it “a bit far-fetched… but this is Game of Thrones, and anything is possible.” How will the final season tie in with George RR Martin's books? The TV series has already overtaken its source, George RR Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire. The plot of the final series will be based on his notes from the final two unfinished novels, The Winds of Winter and A Dream of Spring.  Martin has already released several excerpts from The Winds of Winter on his website, suggesting that progress is well under way. In January 2017, he told his fans he expected the book to be published before the end of the year. While that estimate turned out to be unrealistic, it does suggest he has nearly finished the long-awaited time. Game of Thrones Season 8 | Latest news What do you think will happen in Game of Thrones season 8?  We want to hear from you in the comments section below. To join the conversation simply log in to your Telegraph account or register for free here.

  • Nearly 180 former Ohio State University students claim sexual abuse by doctor
    News
    Reuters

    Nearly 180 former Ohio State University students claim sexual abuse by doctor

    Dr. Richard Strauss was accused of abusing at least 177 male students when he worked as a physician for the university's athletic department and the student health center from 1978 to 1998, the report said, detailing the findings of a year-long independent investigation. Staff members knew of the abuse as early as 1979, but complaints were never elevated to administrators and senior officials of the athletics or student health departments until 1996. At that time, the school suspended and ultimately removed Strauss after a "very limited investigation" into a student's claim that the doctor fondled him during an exam, the report said.

  • Modi’s jobs deficit: J&J’s largest India plant idle three years after completion
    Business
    Reuters

    Modi’s jobs deficit: J&J’s largest India plant idle three years after completion

    It was to eventually employ at least 1,500 people and help bring development to a rural area near Hyderabad in southern India. Two sources familiar with J&J's operations in India and one state government official told Reuters production at the plant, at Penjerla in Telangana state, never began because of a slowing in the growth in demand for the products. One of them said that demand didn’t rise as expected because of two shock policy moves by Prime Minister Narendra Modi: a late 2016 ban on then circulating high-value currency notes, and the nationwide introduction of a goods and services tax (GST) in 2017.