• Russia and America Are Taking Turns Probing Each Other’s Air Space
    World
    The National Interest

    Russia and America Are Taking Turns Probing Each Other’s Air Space

    Six Russian Tu-95 heavy bombers and several Russian Su-35 fighters probed U.S. air-defenses on May 20 and May 21, 2019, prolonging a period of aerial tension between the Moscow and Washington.U.S. Air Force F-22 stealth fighters and supporting aircraft on both days peacefully intercepted the Russian planes. “The Russian bombers and fighters remained in international airspace and at no time did the aircraft enter United States or Canadian sovereign airspace,” North American Aerospace Defense Command reported.“Two pairs of F-22s and an E-3 airborne early warning and control system from North American Aerospace Defense Command positively identified and intercepted a total of four Tupolev Tu-95 bombers and two Su-35 fighters entering the Alaskan Air Defense Identification Zone on May 20,” noted the command, which also is known by its Cold War acronym “NORAD.”“Specifically, two of the Russian bombers were intercepted by two F-22s, and a second group of bombers with Su-35 fighters was intercepted later by two additional F-22s, while the E-3 provided overall surveillance.”

  • China says U.S. needs to fix 'wrong actions' as Huawei ban rattles supply chains
    Business
    Reuters

    China says U.S. needs to fix 'wrong actions' as Huawei ban rattles supply chains

    China said the United States needs to correct its "wrong actions" in order for trade talks to continue after it blacklisted Huawei, a blow that has rippled through global supply chains and battered technology shares. Japanese conglomerate Panasonic Corp joined a growing list of global companies that is disengaging from Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, the world's second-largest seller of smartphones and the largest telecom-gear maker, saying it had stopped shipments of some components. Its move came a day after British chip designer ARM said it had halted relations with Huawei to comply with the U.S. supply blockade, potentially crippling the Chinese firm's ability to make new chips for smartphones.

  • Pelosi says Trump 'is engaged in a cover-up' — drawing his fury
    Politics
    Yahoo News

    Pelosi says Trump 'is engaged in a cover-up' — drawing his fury

    The House speaker slammed the president’s efforts to stonewall ongoing congressional investigations amid calls from some members of her party for his impeachment.

  • Fears rise China could weaponise rare earths in US tech war
    World
    AFP

    Fears rise China could weaponise rare earths in US tech war

    The US has hit China where it hurts by going after its telecom champion Huawei, but Beijing's control of the global supply of rare earths used in smartphones and electric cars gives it a powerful weapon in their escalating tech war. A seemingly routine visit by President Xi Jinping to a Chinese rare earths company this week is being widely read as an obvious threat that Beijing is standing ready for action. Xi's inspection tour "is no accident, this didn't happen by chance," said Li Mingjiang, China programme coordinator at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS) in Singapore.

  • Rain, flooding expected in U.S. Southern Plains after deadly storms
    News
    Reuters

    Rain, flooding expected in U.S. Southern Plains after deadly storms

    Weather forecasters on Wednesday expected drenching rains to roll into the storm-ravaged U.S. southern and central states, where thunderstorms and tornadoes killed at least three people and triggered widespread flooding. More than 30 tornadoes struck a swath from Texas to Iowa since Monday, according to the National Weather Service, and residents in at least three Oklahoma riverfront communities were urged to evacuate due to flooding. One person was killed and another was injured when a tornado struck the rural town of Adair, Iowa, about 50 miles (80 km)west of Des Moines, at about 1:30 a.m. local time, the weather service said.

  • Lawmaker's censure sought after comments about Trump Jr.
    Politics
    Associated Press

    Lawmaker's censure sought after comments about Trump Jr.

    Alabama lawmakers abruptly adjourned after one lawmaker called for the censure of another over comments that included calling the president's son "evidently retarded." Republican Rep. Arnold Mooney of Shelby County on Wednesday went to the House microphone to read a letter seeking censure of Rep. John Rogers, a Democrat. Mooney said Rogers brought "shame" on Alabama with comments he made after debate on a proposed abortion ban.

  • 'Jeopardy!' champ James Holzhauer extends amazing streak with his 24th victory
    Sports
    USA TODAY

    'Jeopardy!' champ James Holzhauer extends amazing streak with his 24th victory

    James Holzhauer extended his 'Jeopardy!' winning streak to an even two dozen Tuesday, as he moves ever closer to the $2 million mark.

  • Stealth History: The F-35C Is Now Ready For War If the U.S. Navy Needs It
    Business
    The National Interest

    Stealth History: The F-35C Is Now Ready For War If the U.S. Navy Needs It

    By 2025, the Navy's aircraft carrier-based air wings will consist of a mix of F-35C, F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, EA-18G Growlers electronic attack aircraft, E-2D Hawkeye battle management and control aircraft, MH-60R/S helicopters and Carrier Onboard Delivery logistics aircraft such as the Navy Osprey tiltrotor aircraft variant.As the F-35C becomes officially deemed “operational” and “ready for war," the Navy is adding weapons, sensors and software to the aircraft to expand its attack envelope --- and may even increase the F-35s ability to carry up to 6 air-to-air weapons in its internal weapons bay.Such a configuration, which would increase the stealth fighter’s internal weapons load by two missiles, has been designed and implemented by F-35-maker Lockheed Martin -- as an offering for the Air Force and Navy to consider.“Lockheed Martin has matured design concepts to integrate 6 air-to-air missiles within the internal weapons bays of the F-35A and F-35C variants,” Lockheed Martin spokesman Michael Friedman told Warrior in a written statement.While making a point to emphasize that any decision to increase the weapons capacity of the F-35 would of course need to come from the military services themselves, Lockheed engineers say the new “internally carried” firepower would massive increase attack options -- all while preserving the stealth configuration of the aircraft.

  • U.S. Justice Dept staff recommends blocking T-Mobile-Sprint deal, sources say
    Business
    Reuters

    U.S. Justice Dept staff recommends blocking T-Mobile-Sprint deal, sources say

    The U.S. Justice Department's antitrust division staff has recommended the agency block T-Mobile US Inc's $26 billion acquisition of smaller rival Sprint Corp, according to two sources familiar with the matter. While Justice Department staff balked at the merger, the Federal Communications Commission indicated on Monday it had reached an agreement in principle with the companies to allow the deal after the companies agreed to sell Sprint's prepaid brand Boost Mobile. The final decision on whether to allow two of the four nationwide wireless carriers to merge now lies with political appointees at the department, headed by antitrust division chief Makan Delrahim.

  • Nancy Pelosi says White House is 'crying out for impeachment'
    Politics
    The Guardian

    Nancy Pelosi says White House is 'crying out for impeachment'

    * House speaker urges family to intervene over Trump’s wellbeing * Pelosi: ‘Maybe he wants a leave of absence’The Democratic speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, said the White House was “crying out for impeachment” and called on Thursday for Donald Trump’s family to intervene in the president’s wellbeing “for the good of the country” after an extraordinary 24 hours in Washington.The dramatic statements came one day after Trump stormed out of a meeting in the Oval Office with Pelosi and the Democratic Senate minority leader, Chuck Schumer, about infrastructure legislation, after three minutes, and then held a hastily called press conference to say he wouldn’t work with Democrats until they stop investigating him.At her own press conference on Thursday morning, Pelosi, speaker of the House of Representatives in Congress, suggested of the president: “Maybe he wants to take a leave of absence.”She said she was not pushing for impeachment despite describing the president’s actions – in relation to Russian interference in the 2016 election and attempts at obstruction of justice, as detailed in the recent report by special counsel Robert Mueller – as impeachable.The Trump administration, led by the White House, had aggressively resisted demands – including subpoenas – from leading congressional Democrats for the government to hand over the full, unredacted Mueller report and for related witnesses to testify on Capitol Hill.“I think impeachment is a very divisive place for us to go in the country,” Pelosi said.However, she repeatedly expressed concern for the president’s wellbeing, which she said reflected a broader concern about the wellbeing of the United States itself. Asked if she was concerned about Trump, she said: “I am.”And she added: “I pray for the president of the United States. I wish that his family or his administration or staff would have an intervention for the good of the country.”The 25th amendment allows the president to be replaced if the vice-president and a majority of his cabinet decide he is incapable of discharging his duties.Before her weekly press conference, Pelosi told colleagues at a meeting on Thursday morning in Washington that Trump’s actions were “villainous”, according to NBC News.The situation blew up the day before when, shortly before Pelosi and Schumer were due to meet with Trump at the White House for negotiations on legislation to fund new infrastructure, Pelosi accused the president of a “cover-up”.The charge stemmed from Trump repeatedly attempting to block congressional committees from investigating him further, following Mueller’s inquiry into Russia’s election meddling in the US, allegations of improper contacts between the Trump election campaign and Moscow, and potential obstruction of justice by the president.Trump then stalked out of the Wednesday meeting in the Oval Office, straight into the adjacent Rose Garden where, from a podium adorned with signs saying “No collusion, no obstruction” the president slammed his opposition and refused to work with them further in the current circumstances.“I don’t do cover-ups,” he said.Then on Thursday morning, before Pelosi’s press conference, the White House spokeswoman, Sarah Sanders, said “it’s insane” to think infrastructure talks could continue after Pelosi had accused Trump of a cover-up.Sanders later added that: “It’s real simple, you can’t go down two tracks,” referring to working on bipartisan legislation at the same time as the Democrats are pushing for deeper investigations into Trump’s actions, while leveling powerful accusations. Schumer said on the MSNBC TV channel that Trump is “an erratic, helter-skelter, get-nothing-done” leader.Robert Mueller’s report resulting from his almost-two year investigation was made public, with certain sensitive parts redacted, in April.While Trump claimed “total exoneration”, the special counsel found 10 episodes in which Trump’s own actions may have amounted to obstruction of justice, detailing several instances in which the president’s demands to interfere with the investigation were blocked by his aides. And in a separate instance, it was found there were additional efforts by the Trump campaign before the election to obscure its contacts with Russian figures.The report separately examined the repeated contacts between the Trump campaign and individuals with ties to the Russian government. While Mueller did not find evidence of a criminal conspiracy, investigators made clear the Trump campaign was “receptive” to offers of assistance from the Russians.Democrats are requesting and in some cases issuing subpoenas for documents, and demanding witnesses, including Mueller, testify on Capitol Hill.Mueller is said to be resisting a public hearing, while the attorney general, William Barr, and former White House counsel Don McGahn have failed to turn up for scheduled hearings in front of the House judiciary committee in recent weeks.Sign up for the US morning briefing

  • 14 Garage Organization Ideas That'll Give You Back Your Parking Spot
    Lifestyle
    Car and Driver

    14 Garage Organization Ideas That'll Give You Back Your Parking Spot

    It's so strangely soothing to see everything this organized in the garage.From Car and Driver

  • Major Texas border station closed for flu outbreak after teen death
    News
    AFP

    Major Texas border station closed for flu outbreak after teen death

    A major Texas border station has been temporarily closed due to a fever outbreak, officials said, one day after a Guatemalan teenager diagnosed with flu at the facility died in immigration custody. Medical staff imposed the quarantine at the McAllen processing center after a "large number" of detainees were found to have high fevers and symptoms of a flu-related illness. "To avoid the spread of illness, the Rio Grande Valley Sector has temporarily suspended intake operations at the CPC," Customs and Border Protection said in a statement late Tuesday, referring to the Central Processing Center.

  • Trump antagonist Avenatti indicted for ripping off Stormy Daniels, extorting Nike
    News
    Reuters

    Trump antagonist Avenatti indicted for ripping off Stormy Daniels, extorting Nike

    The Nike indictment concerns charges announced in March that Avenatti tried to extort more than $20 million from the athletic wear company by threatening to expose what he called its improper payments to recruits for college basketball teams it sponsored. Avenatti also faces dozens of charges in southern California, where prosecutors on April 11 accused him of stealing millions of dollars from clients to pay for personal and business expenses, and lying to the Internal Revenue Service and a Mississippi bank about his finances. If convicted on all charges, Avenatti could face more than 400 years in prison, but would likely face a lesser punishment.

  • Ukraine's parliament snubs new president on election law
    World
    Associated Press

    Ukraine's parliament snubs new president on election law

    KIEV, Ukraine (AP) — Ukrainian lawmakers on Wednesday turned down the new president's proposal to amend the election law in a blow to his hopes to get more of his supporters into parliament.

  • Business
    BGR News

    You can get a top-rated 10W fast wireless charger for just $9.99 if you hurry

    Whether you have an iPhone that needs 7.5 watt fast wireless charging or you have an Android phone that can utilize 10 watt fast wireless charging, there's a great deal right now on Amazon that you definitely should check out. Seneo is a well-known brand on Amazon, and the Seneo 10W Fast Wireless Charger is among the top-rated fast wireless chargers on the site. It's always a great value even at full retail, but the price just dropped to an all-time low of $9.99 on Amazon. Grab one on sale while you can!Here's more info from the product page: * NOTE: (1) QC2.0 or QC3.0 adapter is needed for Quick Charging, 5W Adapter will not work. (2) Make sure your Cell Phone support Qi Wireless Charging and Quick Charging. (3) Make sure using the supplied USB data cable. (4) Check your Phone case thickness(

  • Democratic Rep. Tells Acting DHS Chief: Migrant Kid Deaths Under Your Watch Are ‘Intentional’
    Politics
    The Daily Beast

    Democratic Rep. Tells Acting DHS Chief: Migrant Kid Deaths Under Your Watch Are ‘Intentional’

    Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/CSPANThe acting head of the Department of Homeland Security on Wednesday was accused of overseeing the “intentional” deaths of five migrant children, in an aggressive line of questioning by a Democratic member of the House Committee on Homeland Security. Rep. Lauren Underwood, an Illinois Democrat serving her first term, called the deaths the logical result of “a policy choice being made on purpose by this administration,” an assertion that Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan disputed as “an appalling accusation.”McAleenan, who was first tapped to replace outgoing secretary Kirstjen Nielsen in April, previously served as commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, where he was an architect of the administration’s policy of separating migrant children from their families. That policy, Underwood said, as well as a spate of recent deaths of children in DHS custody, amounts to more than simple administrative negligence.“People keep dying, sir. People keep dying,” Underwood said at the conclusion of five minutes of aggressive questioning, disputing that overcrowding and lack of access to medical treatment at migrant detention facilities is the result of a lack of appropriations. “Congress has been more than willing to provide the resources and work with you to address the security and humanitarian concerns, but at this point, with five kids that have died, 5,000 separated from their families, I feel like—and the evidence is really clear—that this is intentional. It’s intentional.”DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen Blames Migrant Girl’s Death in Border Patrol Custody on Her FamilyAs colleagues protested her characterization, Underwood continued, calling the deaths “a policy choice being made on purpose by this administration, and it’s cruel and inhumane.”McAleenan, who co-authored a memo to then-Secretary Nielsen asserting that Homeland Security could “direct the separation of parents or legal guardians and minors held in immigration detention so that the parent or legal guardian can be prosecuted,” protested Underwood’s remarks.“That’s an appalling accusation, and our men and women fight hard to protect people in our custody every single day,” said McAleenan, adding that Congress providing adequate resources “would have prevented this from happening.”Republican committee members—as well as one Democrat, Rep. Elissa Slotkin of Michigan—voted to strike Underwood’s remarks from the congressional record.On Monday, a 16-year-old Guatemalan boy became the fifth minor to die in U.S. government custody since December after being kept in a U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility for more than a week. Federal law requires minors to be held in Border Patrol stations, which are not equipped to house children or the infirm, for no longer than 72 hours.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

  • After Huawei, U.S. could blacklist Chinese surveillance tech firm: media
    Business
    Reuters

    After Huawei, U.S. could blacklist Chinese surveillance tech firm: media

    The U.S. administration is considering Huawei-like sanctions on Chinese video surveillance firm Hikvision, media reports show, deepening worries that trade friction between the world's top two economies could be further inflamed. The restrictions would limit Hikvision's ability to buy U.S. technology and American companies may have to obtain government approval to supply components to the Chinese firm, the New York Times reported on Tuesday. The United States stuck Huawei Technologies on a trade blacklist last week, effectively banning U.S. firms from doing business with the world's largest telecom network gear maker, in a major escalation in the trade war.

  • Poll finds wide support for Mueller and McGahn to testify in Congress
    Politics
    Yahoo News

    Poll finds wide support for Mueller and McGahn to testify in Congress

    Despite the president's claim that "you can’t investigate and legislate simultaneously," most Americans want Congress to continue asking questions.

  • US border crisis: Sixth migrant child dies in immigration detention
    News
    The Independent

    US border crisis: Sixth migrant child dies in immigration detention

    A 10-year-old girl from El Salvador has died in US custody, it has emerged, bringing the total number of migrant children to have died after being detained by border authorities in the last eight months to six.Mark Weber, a spokesperson for the US Department of Health and Human Services, said the girl was “medically fragile,” with a history of congenital heart defects. She died in September 2018. Mr Weber says the child entered the custody of an Office of Refugee Resettlement in San Antonio, Texas on 4 March, 2018. He said that complications from an unspecified surgical procedure left her in a comatose state.Officials say she was released from the hospital in May and sent to a nursing facility in Phoenix, Arizona for palliative care. She died on 29 September of fever and respiratory distress in a hospital in Omaha, Nebraska. Officials say she had been moved to Omaha to be closer to family.The girl’s name, as well as when and how she entered the US have not been disclosed. HHS provides care to children the government considers unaccompanied.Democrats are calling for investigations into her death, and the five other reported deaths of migrant children detained by the US border patrol.Representative Joaquin Castro, the chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, accused the Trump administration of covering up the 10-year-old girl’s death. "It's outrageous that another child has died in government custody and that the Trump administration didn't tell anybody," the Texas Democrat told CBS. “They covered up her death for eight months, even though we were actively asking the question about whether any child had died or been seriously injured.”“We give them billions of dollars, and they want to use it on a wall instead of spending it to make sure that people don't die and that they can medically treat emergencies that migrants maybe come into or that their own agents may come into,” he continued.On Wednesday, it was reported that the $1.57b Congress appropriated for Donald Trump’s proposed border wall has so far yielded 1.7 miles of fences.

  • Tale of suicidal 'Handmaid' in New York goes viral
    News
    AFP

    Tale of suicidal 'Handmaid' in New York goes viral

    A red-cloaked "Handmaid" ready to hurl herself off a Manhattan building, possibly unhinged by recent legislative assaults on the right to abortion? For months now, amid the #MeToo movement and challenges to the right to abortion in the United States and elsewhere, demonstrations by women dressed in costumes inspired by "The Handmaid's Tale" have multiplied. The hit television series based on Margaret Atwood's 1985 novel evokes a world in which the United States has become a religious dictatorship where fertile women are enslaved and their rape is institutionalized.

  • African swine fever threatens French deli meats producers
    Business
    Reuters

    African swine fever threatens French deli meats producers

    French deli meats makers are being squeezed by a surge in pork prices linked to an African swine fever epidemic that has decimated the pig herd in China, they said on Thursday, warning of potential bankruptcies in the sector. African swine fever, a highly contagious virus, has spread to every province on the Chinese mainland since August last year, killing millions of animals and prompting China - the world's biggest pork producer - to turn to imports earlier this year. In a knock-on effect, French live pork prices have gained 24% since early March, with a rise of as much as 30% for some ingredients used in making deli meats like saucisson, cooked ham and dry-cured ham, making it hard for producers to pass such price rises on to clients, industry association FICT said.

  • Serial cyberstalker could avoid prison again under plea deal
    News
    Associated Press

    Serial cyberstalker could avoid prison again under plea deal

    Only hours before women marched through many U.S. cities in January, Christopher Cleary set off a manhunt when he posted a Facebook message threatening to kill "as many girls as I see" in retaliation for years of romantic rejection. Cleary, 27, called himself a virgin who never had a girlfriend, stoking fears of another deadly rampage by a man blaming women for his problems. When police tracked his cellphone and arrested the Colorado resident at a McDonald's restaurant in Provo, Utah, Cleary said he had been upset and wasn't thinking clearly.