Nissan Titan Is Recalled for a Risk That May Cause an Electrical Short

Jeff S. Bartlett

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Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

Nissan is recalling 91,319 of its 2017-2019 Titan pickup trucks because an electrical short could cause the engine to stall, causing a crash risk. Only gasoline-engine trucks are involved.

The problem stems from potential damage to the alternator wiring harness, which may have occurred during the engine's installation. The alternator generates power for the electrical system. Documents filed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration say that the wiring harness may have come in contact with the square edge of a metal frame bracket. Sustained contact may damage the wires and cause an electrical short.

An electrical short can cause the lights to flicker and prevent the battery from properly charging. This could lead to the battery being discharged and the engine stalling, even when driving.

Dealerships have been given instructions on how to inspect the engine and correct the problem if found.

Owners will be notified starting July 23.  

The Details

Vehicles recalled: 2017-2019 Nissan Titan pickup trucks.

The problem: The wiring harness for the alternator may have been damaged at the factory.

The fix: The dealership will inspect the engine to see whether the wiring is properly routed. If a problem is found, it will clip the wiring into the proper position or replace it.

How to contact the manufacturer: Owners may contact Nissan customer service at 800-867-7669.

NHTSA’s campaign number: 19V495000

Check to see whether your vehicle has an open recall: NHTSA’s website will tell you whether your vehicle has any recalls that need to be addressed.

If you plug your car’s 17-digit vehicle identification number (VIN) into NHTSA’s website and a recall doesn’t appear, it means your vehicle doesn’t currently have any open ones. Because automakers issue recalls often, and for many older vehicles, we recommend checking back regularly.



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