Non-Americans Are Sharing The Misconceptions They Had About The US Before Visiting, And I'm Laughing At A Lot Of These

·5 min read

Whenever you visit a new place, it's easy to experience a bit of culture shock or, at the very least, to witness some things that shock you. So redditor u/FloridaLife96 asked, "Non-Americans of Reddit, what surprised you the most on your trip to America?" Here are some of the responses.

1."I thought Americans ate pizza every single Friday, which is why I wanted to visit the USA in the first place."

NBC

u/daivern

2."I believed Hollywood Boulevard was a beautiful place made up of only famous people walking on red carpets dressed in gowns. A few minutes there and I realized, boy was I wrong...big time."

NBC

u/janeuk

3."I found Americans to be a lot friendlier than I expected. Even in New York, I found people to be extremely friendly, polite, and helpful."

Paramount Pictures Studio

u/Ulf_TheQuarrelsome

4."I was expecting most Americans to be morbidly obese. Then I arrived in Colorado, where 90% of people are fit as hell."

DreamWorks Pictures

u/kremacnipec

5."My German friends wanted to shoot all my guns. When I told them I didn't have any, they looked at me like I was lying."

HBO

u/deleted

6."That there are 50 states...not 52. Almost every non-American I know thinks (or thought, at some point) that there are 52 states. I suspect that Hawaii and Alaska might be involved."

Apatow Productions

u/Stinglash

7."I thought more people would actually say 'yeeehaaaw' a lot more."

Focus Features

u/ithoughtwe

8."How surprisingly cold it can get in parts of Arizona. I visited AZ after spending a year in northern Ohio and didn't dress for the elements. I didn't think anything could be worse than winter in Cleveland. Nope, I almost froze to death when I went to see the Grand Canyon."

Walt Disney Pictures

u/Leothir

9."I didn't realize those red Solo cups were actually real and that everyone uses them at parties. I thought it was just, like, a thing in movies."

FOX

u/frankchester

10."I was really weirded out by how high the water was in the toilets."

NBC

u/votemarvel

11."I knew America was big, but I was so very wrong thinking I could easily drive from New York to Florida. I just didn't quite register how bloody far away everything is."

Warner Bros.

u/curiositywon

12."The drug advertisements on TV. Who am I to tell my doctor what drugs I think will be most effective? The whole concept is ludicrous."

ABC

u/Slicy_McGimpFag

13."How much fast food there is and how many different fast-food restaurants you can always choose from. Here in Canada there are about four choices, but in the US there are at least 15. And there's a definite hierarchy in terms of fast-food quality."

New Line Cinema

u/mrpopenfresh

14."I thought most Americans were affluent because I grew up in Asia, and most Americans I met there lived in really nice houses and had all the latest gadgets. Now I'm studying in the US, and I've noticed that's not the case. In fact, there's a huge socioeconomic gap."

The CW

u/xthiKKx

15."American markets have a whole aisle dedicated just to soda."

NBC

u/deleted

16."I thought the states would be more unified, but it surprised me how much Americans identify with their home state...and how much they talk shit about other states."

Netflix

u/Idleworker

17."At Rite Aid you can get a flu shot, an HIV test, a bottle of tequila, a Snickers bar, and pizza pockets all from the same store. And at IHOP you can get an entire days worth of calories in one meal."

NBC

u/deleted

18."I thought that living in the US meant I could go to Disneyland whenever I wanted. Turns out it's very far away and also really expensive."

NBC

u/ogonga

19."How unglamorous LA actually is compared to how it's depicted in TV shows and movies."

E!

u/lakskanxnx

20."I thought tipping in the US was a courteous thing to do without realizing that it is a mandatory and expected custom. Why don't you just charge 18% more and pay the staff 18% more? It'll never make sense to me."

Netflix

u/SomeguyIseen

21."The size of your popcorn portions when I went to the movies. I could basically fit my whole arm in the bag of popcorn I bought."

NBC

u/Stapes89

22."I thought American cuisine revolved around bacon. It was sad to discover this is not actually the case."

Hulu

u/thealphazen

23."I was shocked that the American Southern accent is real and not just made up for TV."

Bravo

u/CanuckJ86

24."All the different combinations of foods at restaurants and the portion sizes. Like a plate piled high with pancakes, bacon, and maple syrup... This breakfast combo has changed my life."

Vimeo

u/dellymort

25."I thought that American beer would be terrible and they only drink Budweiser. The US has so many craft beers it's amazing. I went to a bar in Boston that had something like 200 different beers."

NBC

u/deleted

26."That those bright yellow school buses are real and not just used in movies."

Happy Madison Productions

u/rezonator124

27."I used to think it snowed all over the US during the winter and all Americans got to celebrate a white Christmas. I was pretty let down when I landed in Dallas on Christmas Eve."

20th Century Studios

u/abpat2203

28."I thought cheerleading teams and competitions were just something fictional made up for movies. Turns out they're real."

Beacon Pictures

u/yoonssoo

29."I didn't think sheriffs were real for some reason, at least not anymore. Turns out, they still are."

Searchlight Pictures

u/Axin13

What shocked you most or defied your expectations the first time you visited the US? Tell us in the comments below.

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