'Non-scalable' fencing erected around White House, stores boarded up in anticipation of election protests

MICHELLE STODDART
·1 min read

Non-scalable fencing was being temporarily installed around the White House perimeter on Monday in advance of Election Day.

PHOTO: Workers are seen behind layers of security fencing in front of the White House the day before the presidential election in Washington, D.C., Nov. 2, 2020. (Erin Scott/Reuters)
PHOTO: Workers are seen behind layers of security fencing in front of the White House the day before the presidential election in Washington, D.C., Nov. 2, 2020. (Erin Scott/Reuters)

Additional fencing already has been erected around Lafayette Square, across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House, the location of protests over racial equality in June.

The fencing will be temporary, and is among other measures being taken in Washington, D.C., and other cities ahead of expected demonstrations.

PHOTO: Wooden boards protect a Starbucks location near the White House on Oct. 31, 2020 in Washington, D.C. (Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Wooden boards protect a Starbucks location near the White House on Oct. 31, 2020 in Washington, D.C. (Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images)

Many businesses in downtown Washington have boarded up windows in anticipation of violence as have some in New York City.

PHOTO: Workers in the Soho area of New York prepare their businesses by boarding up on Nov. 2, 2020, as they make plans for potential civil unrest during the presidential race for the White House. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Workers in the Soho area of New York prepare their businesses by boarding up on Nov. 2, 2020, as they make plans for potential civil unrest during the presidential race for the White House. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images)

The government center in Minneapolis was boarded up for the same reason.

PHOTO: The Government Center, though open for business, remains boarded up, Nov. 2, 2020, in Minneapolis ahead of Tuesday's general election. (Jim Mone/AP)
PHOTO: The Government Center, though open for business, remains boarded up, Nov. 2, 2020, in Minneapolis ahead of Tuesday's general election. (Jim Mone/AP)

MORE: How to watch ABC News' 2020 presidential election coverage

In a news conference last week, District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser and Police Chief Peter Newsham discussed preparations in the city ahead of the election.

Newsham told reporters that his office has not received any credible threats of violence, but that the city has received a number of requests for demonstration permits.

PHOTO: Workers move a stack of fencing near a security checkpoint on the South side of the White House, the day before the presidential election, in Washington, Nov. 2, 2020. (Erin Scott/Reuters)
PHOTO: Workers move a stack of fencing near a security checkpoint on the South side of the White House, the day before the presidential election, in Washington, Nov. 2, 2020. (Erin Scott/Reuters)

“We welcome people to come to the District of Columbia to exercise their First Amendment right, but we won’t tolerate violence or unrest,” said Newsham.

Bowser announced the city will implement parking restrictions, with the possibility of road closures in the downtown area on Election Day.

Bowser also said that she has not requested help from the National Guard.

PHOTO: A dump truck drives on the South side of the White House, the day before the presidential election, in Washington, Nov. 2, 2020. (Erin Scott/Reuters)
PHOTO: A dump truck drives on the South side of the White House, the day before the presidential election, in Washington, Nov. 2, 2020. (Erin Scott/Reuters)

“We also know that some people would like to cause mayhem or trouble. We don’t have any specific thing to report to you about that, but we will tell you that we are preparing to ensure the city’s safety,” Bowser said.

Jack Date and Dee Carden contributed to this report.

'Non-scalable' fencing erected around White House, stores boarded up in anticipation of election protests originally appeared on abcnews.go.com