New Normal: How 3 countries are luring tourists back

DUTCH HOLIDAYMAKER, GRAPHIC DESIGNER, AMY SMULDERS, SAYING:

"It's Monday and I'm ready to go to Rhodes."

What would it take for you to go on holiday and feel safe?

Dutch holidaymaker Amy Smulders is travelling to Greece as part of an experiment - run by a tour operator and the Dutch government.

to see if safe holidays can be arranged for the Greek tourism industry, which has been hit badly in the last year.

"So we're at the airport right now, we did out PCR test for testing for COVID, and I think the result is going to be fine. I think we have to check in right now and then we're going to Greece!"

It's just one way that countries are hoping to lure back tourists this summer to fill their empty beaches and resorts.

1. GREECE

Smulders was one of 200 or so Dutch tourists that took part in the experiment.

The holiday is at a Greek beach resort - where guests can enjoy access to the hotel’s pool, restaurants, and other facilities.

The catch is, they can’t leave.

No long walks along the beach, no mingling with other guests closer than 5 ft, and at least five days of quarantine upon return.

It might sound stark but demand was high - around 25,000 people signed up in the hope of getting a ticket.

2. CROATIA

The picture-postcard Croatian resort of Porec is expecting a flood of tourists from mid-May

as travel restrictions are gradually eased around Europe,

and they are making sure they are well prepared.

PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER OF PLAVA LAGUNA HOTEL GROUP, EVA DE ZAN PRUSINA, SAYING:

"We have invested a lot in security in our facilities: from increased disinfection of the space, to the introduction of plexiglass at the reception and on our tables, we have hired more staff at buffet tables meaning that guests do not have to take their own food but that the food is served."

Down the Adriatic coast in Dubrovnik,

a multi-million-euro government campaign aims to get around 80,000 tourism workers vaccinated,

while offering guests subsidized tests.

3. THAILAND

Phuket was once one of the loudest tourist destinations in Southeast Asia.

It now feels like a quiet beach town.

Shops and bars re-shuttered and local residents and vendors are desperate for business to return.

Uga, who is deaf, tries to sell coconuts on an empty shoreline.

COCONUT AND DRINK VENDOR, UGA, SAYING:

"The people have become unemployed, they have no money, the situation is very bad. All the stores are closed, people are suffering."

Phuket aims to deliver shots to at least 460,000 people - most of its population – as it gears up for the July 1 opening,

when quarantine for vaccinated overseas visitors ends.

Phuket also has its own international airport,

meaning tourists can roam the island freely without posing a risk to the rest of Thailand's population.

Video Transcript

AMY SMULDERS: So it's Monday. And I'm ready to go to Rhodes.

- What would it take for you to go on holiday and feel safe? Dutch holidaymaker Amy Smulders is traveling to Greece as part of an experiment, run by a tour operator and the Dutch government, to see if safe holidays can be arranged for the Greek tourism industry, which has been badly hit in the last year.

AMY SMULDERS: So we're at the airport right now. We did our PCR test for testing for COVID. And I think the results are going to be fine. I think we have to check in right now. And then we're going to Greece.

- It's just one way that countries are hoping to lure back tourists this summer to fill their empty beaches and resorts. Smulders was one of 200 or so Dutch tourists that took part in the experiment. The holiday is at a Greek beach resort where guests can enjoy access to the hotel's pool, restaurants, and other facilities. The catch is they can't leave. No long walks on the beach. No mingling with other guests closer than five foot. And at least five days quarantine upon return. It might sound stark but demand was high. Around 25,000 people signed up in the hope of getting a ticket.

[NO SPEECH]

- The Croatian resort of Porec is expecting a flood of tourists from mid-May as travel restrictions are gradually eased around Europe. And they're making sure they're well prepared.

EVA DE ZAN PRUSINA: [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH]

- We've invested a lot in security in our facilities, from increased disinfection of the space, to the introduction of plexiglass at the reception and on our tables. We've hired more staff at buffet tables, meaning that guests do not have to take their own food. But the food is served.

[NO SPEECH]

- Phuket was one of the loudest tourist destinations in Southeast Asia. It now feels like a quiet beach town. Shops and bars re-shuttered, and local residents and vendors are desperate for business to return. Uga, who is deaf, tries to sell coconuts on an empty shoreline.

- The people have become unemployed. They have no money. The situation is very bad. All the stores are closed. People are suffering.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

- Phuket aims to deliver shots to at least 460,000 people, most of its population, as it gears up for the July the first opening, when quarantine for vaccinated overseas visitors ends. Phuket also has its own international airport, meaning tourists can roam the island freely, without posing a risk to the rest of Thailand's population.