NRA sues NY attorney general, says she wants to destroy 'political enemy'

FILE PHOTO: Attendees sign up at the National Rifle Association booth at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Oxon Hill, Maryland
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Jonathan Stempel
·2 min read
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By Jonathan Stempel

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The National Rifle Association filed a countersuit against New York Attorney General Letitia James, saying she lacks authority to invoke state laws governing nonprofits in her zeal to destroy the gun rights group.

In a Tuesday night court filing, the NRA, which filed for bankruptcy last month, accused James of "weaponizing" her powers to pursuing a "blatant and malicious retaliation campaign" against it because she dislikes what it stands for.

James' office did not immediately respond on Wednesday to requests for comment.

The attorney general had sued the NRA and Chief Executive Wayne LaPierre last August, saying the nonprofit diverted millions of dollars to fund luxurious trips for officials, no-show contracts for associates, and other questionable expenses.

"James commenced her investigations and this action against the NRA with the sole purpose of seeking to dissolve a political enemy," the NRA said.

The NRA said the Democrat's "selective enforcement" of state not-for-profit laws violated its constitutional rights to free speech and equal protection, warranting the lawsuit's dismissal.

It also denied many of James' accusations, as did LaPierre, in court filings on Tuesday.

The lawsuit deepens the divide between the NRA and James, who is also seeking to dismiss the group's bankruptcy.

Noting that the NRA claims to be solvent, James has called its bankruptcy and plan to reincorporate in Texas after 150 years in New York a bad-faith effort to escape her lawsuit and oversight.

She has also proposed letting a court-appointed trustee take over the NRA's affairs if the bankruptcy proceeds. A hearing on her requests is scheduled for March 29 in the Dallas bankruptcy court.

Bankruptcy filings normally halt existing litigation, but James has said she deserves an exemption to enforce her "police and regulatory power."

The case is New York v. National Rifle Association et al, New York State Supreme Court, New York County, No. 451625/2020.

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; Additional reporting by Maria Chutchian; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and Jonathan Oatis)