Nursing homes prepare to allow limited outdoor visits

Starting this weekend, long-term care facilities can allow guests under strict conditions.

  • Do children spread coronavirus? What doctors say about going back to school
    NBC News

    Do children spread coronavirus? What doctors say about going back to school

    But this doesn't mean classrooms can be exempt from social distancing and other safety precautions, particularly if schools intend to welcome kids back on site in less than two months. "It really shouldn't be a debate of getting kids back to school, but getting kids back to school safely," said Dr. Jennifer Lighter, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at NYU Langone Health in New York. Having kids physically present in schools in the fall as much as possible would be an "ideal situation," Lighter said, but schools will need to implement policies that allow students to maintain some distance indoors and avoid close contact for prolonged periods of time.

  • Associated Press

    Pakistan says 4 troops, 4 militants killed in shootout in NW

    Pakistan's military on Sunday said four soldiers and four militants were killed during a shootout in the rugged northwestern region of North Waziristan, which borders Afghanistan. A statement from the military's public relations wing said the exchange of fire took place after the army personnel had surrounded the militant hideout early Sunday. The statement did not identify the militants, but Pakistan's military has been battling members of the Pakistani Taliban group, known as the Tehreek-e-Taliban (TTP) in that region for years.

  • Walt Disney World reopens in Florida amid Covid-19 surge
    BBC

    Walt Disney World reopens in Florida amid Covid-19 surge

    Walt Disney World Resort has begun to reopen in Florida despite a coronavirus surge across the US state. Epcot and Disney's Hollywood Studios are expected to follow from 15 July. More than a quarter of a million cases of Covid-19 have been reported in Florida, along with 4,197 deaths.

  • Pope 'very pained' by decision to turn Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into mosque
    Reuters

    Pope 'very pained' by decision to turn Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into mosque

    Pope Francis said on Sunday he was hurt by Turkey's decision to make Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum a mosque, the latest religious leader to condemn the move. Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan has said the first prayers would be held in Hagia Sophia on July 24, after declaring the ancient monument was once again a mosque following a court ruling revoking its status as a museum.

  • ‘We’re going to lose a lot of teachers.’ Coronavirus kills beloved Arizona educator
    Miami Herald

    ‘We’re going to lose a lot of teachers.’ Coronavirus kills beloved Arizona educator

    Kimberley Chavez Lopez Byrd loved teaching so much that the 61-year-old Arizona woman returned to work after retiring, according to The Arizona Republic. “She was a wonderful teacher, respected by everyone that she worked with,” said Jeff Gregorich, superintendent of the Hayden-Winkelman Unified School District, KSAZ reported. With kids stuck at home, Byrd shared a classroom with two other teachers for a virtual summer school program, CNN reported.

  • Couple who threatened Black Lives Matter protesters with guns once destroyed children's beehives
    Yahoo News Video

    Couple who threatened Black Lives Matter protesters with guns once destroyed children's beehives

    St. Louis couple Mark and Patricia McCloskey drew national attention in June when they flashed guns at Black Lives Matter protesters walking down their street.

  • Caribbean countries are selling citizenship for as low as $100,000 — here's how the ultra-wealthy are cashing in to avoid pandemic travel restrictions
    Business Insider

    Caribbean countries are selling citizenship for as low as $100,000 — here's how the ultra-wealthy are cashing in to avoid pandemic travel restrictions

    Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images Secondary passports are in high demand as the coronavirus pandemic causes travel restrictions around the world. In the Caribbean, some nations are offering steep discounts to bring in extra revenue amid a cash crunch. Passport buying has shifted from simple vacations to riding out the virus, experts say.

  • The White House Made a List of All the Times Fauci ‘Has Been Wrong’ on the Coronavirus
    The Daily Beast

    The White House Made a List of All the Times Fauci ‘Has Been Wrong’ on the Coronavirus

    The White House has undertaken behind-the-scenes efforts in recent months to undercut and sideline Dr. Anthony Fauci—even going so far as to compile a list of all the times he “has been wrong on things,” according to The Washington Post. After canceling some of his planned TV appearances and keeping him away from the Oval Office, White House officials and President Trump have taken to publicly expressing a loss of confidence in the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and face of the administration's coronavirus task force. The apparent attempts to undermine Fauci come as he continues to counter the president's overly optimistic narrative on the state of the pandemic.

  • Leading Hong Kong activists charged for Tiananmen vigil gathering
    AFP

    Leading Hong Kong activists charged for Tiananmen vigil gathering

    Thirteen prominent Hong Kong democracy activists appeared in court on Monday charged with holding an unauthorised gathering to mark the Tiananmen Square crackdown, the latest in a string of prosecutions against protest leaders in the restless financial hub. Last month tens of thousands of Hong Kongers defied a ban on rallies to mark the June 4 anniversary of Beijing's deadly 1989 crackdown against students pushing for democracy. The annual vigil has been held in Hong Kong for the last three decades and usually attracts huge crowds.

  • University professors fear returning to campus as coronavirus cases surge
    NBC News

    University professors fear returning to campus as coronavirus cases surge

    However, professors were initially required to return to campus to teach in person and there wasn't an option to work remotely. The university later put in place a policy where faculty could file a request to work remotely, but there wasn't a guarantee that the request would be accommodated. Boston University philosophy professors Daniel Star and Russell Powell wrote an open letter to the university urging it to allow professors to make their own decisions about returning to campus.

  • Coronavirus deaths take a long-expected turn for the worse
    Associated Press

    Coronavirus deaths take a long-expected turn for the worse

    A long-expected upturn in U.S. coronavirus deaths has begun, driven by fatalities in states in the South and West, according to data on the pandemic. The number of deaths per day from the virus had been falling for months, and even remained down as states like Florida and Texas saw explosions in cases and hospitalizations — and reported daily U.S. infections broke records several times in recent days. According to an Associated Press analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University, the seven-day rolling average for daily reported deaths in the U.S. has increased from 578 two weeks ago to 664 on July 10 — still well below the heights hit in April.

  • The murder of Vanessa Guillén has opened the floodgates on sexual assault in the US military as servicewomen rush to share their stories
    Business Insider

    The murder of Vanessa Guillén has opened the floodgates on sexual assault in the US military as servicewomen rush to share their stories

    US Army The murder of 20-year-old soldier Vanessa Guillén has sparked thousands of servicewomen to come forward to share their own stories of sexual assault in the US military. Guillén, who was bludgeoned to death with a hammer, told her family that she was being sexually harassed at the Fort Hood Army base in Texas months before she went missing, her mother and sisters have said. Two former servicewomen spoke to Insider about the sexual abuse they experienced while in the military and shared how their reports were mishandled by authorities.

  • Daniel Lewis Lee: First US federal execution in 17 years to go ahead
    BBC

    Daniel Lewis Lee: First US federal execution in 17 years to go ahead

    The first federal execution in the United States for more than 17 years is set to go ahead in Indiana on Monday following a ruling by an appeal court. Daniel Lewis Lee and an accomplice were convicted of killing three members of the same family in 1996. The appeal court overturned a decision by a lower court that put the execution of 47-year-old Lee on hold, saying no federal statute or regulation gave the victims the right to attend the execution.

  • India's Biocon secures approval to use drug on coronavirus patients
    Reuters

    India's Biocon secures approval to use drug on coronavirus patients

    India's Biocon Ltd has received regulatory approval for its drug Itolizumab to be used on coronavirus infected patients suffering from moderate to severe respiratory distress, the biopharmaceutical company said in a statement on Saturday. The drug, which is also used to cure the skin disease psoriasis, was cleared by the Drug Controller General of India (DCGI) for usage in India. "The randomised control trial indicated that all the patients treated with Itolizumab responded positively and recovered," said Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, the firm's executive chairperson.

  • South Africa's 9 million smokers were faced with cold turkey when the government banned cigarette sales in March as a coronavirus measure. Now Big Tobacco is fighting back.
    INSIDER

    South Africa's 9 million smokers were faced with cold turkey when the government banned cigarette sales in March as a coronavirus measure. Now Big Tobacco is fighting back.

    earlier in July. South Africa's government had also banned the sale of alcohol but has since eased that restriction, which according to an AP report, has led to an increase in "drunken brawls and traffic accidents, putting added strain on hospitals as they deal with the virus." Reuters FITA is also arguing that by banning the legal sale of cigarettes, the South African government is encouraging a black market trade, and putting thousands of jobs at risk.

  • Russia's journalists under increasing pressure from the secret services in wake of Putin's shaky referendum victory
    The Telegraph

    Russia's journalists under increasing pressure from the secret services in wake of Putin's shaky referendum victory

    Russia's intelligence services have 'stepped up' their war on free media, carrying out a series of operations designed to intimidate journalists in the wake of Vladimir Putin's controversial referendum victory last week. In an unprecedented case for post-Soviet Russia, prominent defence reporter Ivan Safronov was seized outside his home on Tuesday morning by secret service agents and arrested on suspicion of treason. Last week's overwhelming approval of constitutional amendments allowing Vladimir Putin to stay in office at least until 2036 was hailed by the Kremlin as a “triumph.”

  • Shooting of man by Baltimore police highlights 'total failure' of city's behavioral health response, agency says
    Baltimore Sun

    Shooting of man by Baltimore police highlights 'total failure' of city's behavioral health response, agency says

    After Baltimore police officers shot a man who pulled a firearm while undergoing a behavioral health crisis last week, the organization that oversees the city's behavioral health services called the current system “a total failure” that needs better integration of mental health professionals with the police. There is no indication that police dispatchers attempted to connect available behavioral health resources with officers on the scene before they shot Ricky Walker Jr. on July 1, said Adrienne Breidenstine, vice president of policy and communications for Behavioral Health System Baltimore. The city has two so-called crisis response teams that handle mental health issues, one inside the police department and another at the nonprofit Baltimore Crisis Response Inc. Breidenstine said the incident highlights how the city has created an unnecessarily complex system to deal with people in crisis.

  • United or Divided States of America? 6 ways to think about removing Confederate statues
    USA TODAY Opinion

    United or Divided States of America? 6 ways to think about removing Confederate statues

    While there is a lot of discussion these days about statues in the public square, it is important to note that taking down Confederate statues does not actually erase history. Their very presence in prominent public locations effectively dilutes the history of the North's victory over the South and the fight to save the United States of America. History is still to be found in books, archives and museums.

  • City mulls razing site where 1st Alaska flag flew
    Associated Press

    City mulls razing site where 1st Alaska flag flew

    The fate of one of Alaska's most historic yet neglected structures could be decided Monday as city officials in Seward weigh whether to demolish a former Methodist boarding school where the Alaska territorial flag was first flown almost a century ago and where its Alaska Native designer lived. Benny Benson was among the orphans and displaced children who lived at the Jesse Lee Home, many of whom were sent there after the Spanish flu devastated Alaska Native villages. Benson, a 13-year-old Aleut boy sent to the home after his mother died of the flu, won a territory-wide contest in 1927 to design the flag, which became the state flag after statehood was granted in 1959.

  • If He Loses, Trump Must Resign Immediately and Make Biden President. No, Really.
    The Daily Beast

    If He Loses, Trump Must Resign Immediately and Make Biden President. No, Really.

    If Trump does not resign before the election in November, there is little question he should resign the next day if he loses, especially if the election is not close, and turn the reins of power over to the president-elect. A landslide win by Biden will mean that the pandemic is not under control and probably that the economy remains in turmoil or perhaps ruins. This makes Trump's immediate removal from office all the more compelling because experts are warning that COVID-19 may build into another wave just as the regular flu season kicks into high gear starting in November.

  • A revival of ultrafast supersonic passenger jet travel is inching closer to reality – take a look at the prototype debuting in October
    Business Insider

    A revival of ultrafast supersonic passenger jet travel is inching closer to reality – take a look at the prototype debuting in October

    Boom Supersonic Aircraft start-up Boom Supersonic is one step closer to bringing back supersonic passenger travel with its flagship Overture jet. The Overture's prototype and demonstrator, the XB-1, will be unveiled in October and plans to take to the skies in 2021. If the XB-1 has a successful test flight program, the Overture could fly within the next 10 years, bringing back supersonic travel to the public.

  • 'Nobody knew': Officer-involved killings are often kept under the radar. He's shining a light.
    NBC News

    'Nobody knew': Officer-involved killings are often kept under the radar. He's shining a light.

    For nearly two months, protesters around the world filled city streets, marched on government buildings and demanded justice for George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Elijah McClain and Andres Guardado — all who died during encounters with law enforcement. D. Brian Burghart, a former reporter and editor, has dedicated eight years to doing what federal agencies have not done: meticulously track every known law enforcement officer-involved killing in the United States. The result is Fatal Encounters, a national database that shines a light into the darkest corners of policing in America.

  • U.S. warns citizens of heightened detention risks in China
    Reuters

    U.S. warns citizens of heightened detention risks in China

    The U.S. State Department warned American citizens on Saturday to "exercise increased caution" in China due to heightened risk of arbitrary law enforcement including detention and a ban from exiting the country. "U.S. citizens may be detained without access to U.S. consular services or information about their alleged crime," the State Department said in a security alert issued to its citizens in China, adding that U.S. citizens may face "prolonged interrogations and extended detention" for reasons related to state security. "Security personnel may detain and/or deport U.S. citizens for sending private electronic messages critical of the Chinese government," it added, without citing specific examples.

  • Hong Kong security law: Why we are taking our BNOs and leaving
    BBC

    Hong Kong security law: Why we are taking our BNOs and leaving

    Since China imposed a draconian national security law on Hong Kong, a lot of dinner party chatter in this protest-minded city has been about personal exit strategies. Michael and Serena have decided to leave Hong Kong for good and settle in the UK, a country they have never set foot in. The couple have British National (Overseas) - or BNO - passports, which were issued to Hong Kong residents that registered before the city was handed back to China on July 1997.

  • Victory to the Sioux: Proud tribe defeats major oil firm backed by Trump
    The Telegraph

    Victory to the Sioux: Proud tribe defeats major oil firm backed by Trump

    LaDonna Brave Bull Allard grins broadly as she contemplates the significance of the victory she and other members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe have just secured. The tribe began a bitter battle against an oil company and the federal government in 2016, when the Dakota Access pipeline was built on their doorstep, threatening their water supply. It is not often that a Native American tribe with scant resources defeats a major oil company, not least one that has the backing of the US president.