Oakley school board caught making controversial comments

"They want their babysitters back." There are growing calls for board members of the Oakley Union Elementary School District Board of Education to resign after they were caught making light of students still being at home.

Video Transcript

GREGORY HETRICK: I'll say I believe what I'm gonna share will answer a lot of that, then.

ERICA IPPOLITO: Yeah.

LISA BRIZENDINE: So nine is gonna go before seven.

GREGORY HETRICK: No, nine is how we comment on nonagendized items.

LISA BRIZENDINE: Oh, OK.

GREGORY HETRICK: And so we have zero public comment on nonagendized items.

ERICA IPPOLITO: Oh.

GREGORY HETRICK: All the public comment is related to agendized items.

ERICA IPPOLITO: Oh, I see it.

GREGORY HETRICK: So we just say--

ERICA IPPOLITO: So 12.

GREGORY HETRICK: At 6.0, we'll add public comment--

ERICA IPPOLITO: Oh, sorry, no.

GREGORY HETRICK: --on agendized items, and then you can just--

ERICA IPPOLITO: Yeah.

GREGORY HETRICK: --that these will be read aloud in the meeting, three minutes per individual. The board appreciates all public input. We don't have to restate that 3 o'clock and all that because it's already happened.

LISA BRIZENDINE: Do you want me to just say I'm moving 9.0 to-- in place of 6.0?

GREGORY HETRICK: And just--

LISA BRIZENDINE: [INAUDIBLE] or no?

GREGORY HETRICK: That's fine, and it's just-- but it's gonna be agendized items because the comments are for agendized items, not nonagendized items.

LISA BRIZENDINE: Do we need to consider nonagendized items, do I need to say it again?

GREGORY HETRICK: Say that one more time?

LISA BRIZENDINE: Do I need to read the public comment on nonagendized items again and say there's no comments on nonagendized items?

GREGORY HETRICK: No, you just-- 9.0, we have no public comment on nonagendized items. So then go to 10.0. And then an item that's vetted--

LISA BRIZENDINE: 6.0, I'm removing 6.0, administer the oath of office, and I'm making it 6.0, public comment on agendized items.

GREGORY HETRICK: Correct.

LISA BRIZENDINE: OK.

RICHIE MASADAS: Is that still a 20-minute time limit?

LISA BRIZENDINE: I'd better go to the bathroom. I'll be back.

RICHIE MASADAS: Or is it because it's an agendized item, there's no time limit?

GREGORY HETRICK: We generally haven't for things that are on the-- that would probably cause a storm that we don't want to deal with, so.

KIM BEEDE: Yeah, the other ones that we've done before, we did all of them. I think we've had more than this before.

GREGORY HETRICK: You know, I was talking to-- I was talking to one of my buddies. He's out in Benicia. And they just recently changed how they do public comment. And anyone that wants to put in a public comment has to call into their tech department, and they record their message.

And it only lets you go for three minutes. And it just lets them know that, hey, before you start, once you get three minutes, it's going to stop, and that's it. And you're done. And then it records them, and then they just hit play, play, play. And so they actually get played during the thing, and they don't have to be read.

KIM BEEDE: I think we should do that.

GREGORY HETRICK: So I'll-- that's what I wanted to ask. And with some direction, I'll get some--

KIM BEEDE: Yes.

GREGORY HETRICK: --more information on that and figure out-- he said he would have his tech guy walk us through that, so.

KIM BEEDE: I think that would be amazing. Well, Ms. President isn't here, but I'm sure that she would love that, too. Why didn't we do that when I was president?

RICHIE MASADAS: Will our tech department be able to handle that, Greg?

LISA BRIZENDINE: What'd I miss?

GREGORY HETRICK: Sorry, Lisa. So this is kind of right up your alley with--

LISA BRIZENDINE: Yeah.

GREGORY HETRICK: --the technology. I was talking to one of my buddies. He's the superintendent in Benicia, and we were talking about public comment. And they just recently switched, so their tech department set it up to where people that want to submit a public comment call in and have to leave a message. And the message will cut you off at three minutes.

So it's like, hi, my name is Greg Hetrick. I live at, you know, 2221 Delta Road, Knightsen, California. And I wish to speak on blah-blah-blah-blah-blah. And they say it, da-da-da-da-da. And if three minutes comes, it just cuts them off midsentence, and you're done. And then that gets saved, and they send it in.

LISA BRIZENDINE: I love that.

KIM BEEDE: Right? Like, I--

ERICA IPPOLITO: I think that's a good idea.

KIM BEEDE: --do that when I was president?

ERICA IPPOLITO: Right. We need that.

RICHIE MASADAS: I'm all for it. But the question is, will our IT department be able to break away from what [INAUDIBLE] doing?

GREGORY HETRICK: Yeah. We won't make any announcement that we're switching anything until we've worked it out and make sure that we can do it and all that. So, yeah. Kelly and I will work on that.

RICHIE MASADAS: Because that means you would literally have to pull someone from IT during that day, and they would have to just sit there and wait for the call to record.

GREGORY HETRICK: My understanding is it's set up like you would just leave a message, but it will only allow you to leave a three-minute message from start to finish.

RICHIE MASADAS: OK.

GREGORY HETRICK: And so it just goes and then it just, you know, it captures it, and then goes.

KIM BEEDE: Oh, boy.

RICHIE MASADAS: You know what? Hey, Kim, I was just thinking-- I was just thinking right now, just to encourage you.

KIM BEEDE: Yeah.

RICHIE MASADAS: People-- it's easy to hide behind their screen and put--

KIM BEEDE: Oh, yeah.

RICHIE MASADAS: --their phone's down. But when you're face to face with people, it's a whole different-- it's a little different ballgame.

KIM BEEDE: Well, what's funny is that she's friends with who I went-- went to [INAUDIBLE]. And it was posted-- wasn't my social media. Someone else posted it. It's like, whatever. I wasn't doing anything bad. I really-- I honestly don't care about that part. But you know what? Are we alone?

RICHIE MASADAS: Yeah.

KIM BEEDE: [BLEEP]. If you're gonna call me out, I'm gonna [BLEEP] you up.

[LAUGHTER]

Sorry, that's just me.

ERICA IPPOLITO: You know, they forget that there's real people on the other side of those letters that they're writing.

KIM BEEDE: Yes.

ERICA IPPOLITO: We're real community members. We have kids or have known kids that have gone to these schools.

KIM BEEDE: Right.

ERICA IPPOLITO: We have had a vested interest in this process and they don't know what we do--

KIM BEEDE: Right.

ERICA IPPOLITO: --behind the scenes. And it's really unfortunate--

KIM BEEDE: Exactly.

ERICA IPPOLITO: --that they want to pick on us because they want their babysitters back.

LISA BRIZENDINE: Right.

KIM BEEDE: Right.

ERICA IPPOLITO: Right.

KIM BEEDE: I agree, and it's fine. It's just-- they get [INAUDIBLE]

RICHIE MASADAS: I totally hear that because my brother had a delivery-- yeah, my brother had a delivery service for medical marijuana. The highest clientele were parents with their kids in school.

[LAUGHTER]

ERICA IPPOLITO: That's awesome.

RICHIE MASADAS: So when you got-- when you got your kids at home, no more [INAUDIBLE]. No more [BLEEP], yes, [INAUDIBLE].

ERICA IPPOLITO: I have all of his football pictures down.

RICHIE MASADAS: Yeah, your quarterback might be traded. He's not happy.

ERICA IPPOLITO: I heard. Frankie's not [INAUDIBLE].

KIM BEEDE: Like I said, right now, it sucks.

GREGORY HETRICK: Right. All three of our candidates are on and ready to go when we're ready to go.

LISA BRIZENDINE: OK.

KIM BEEDE: Uh-oh. Laurel [INAUDIBLE]-- just FYI, you guys have the meeting-- oh, we have the meeting open to the public right now.

LISA BRIZENDINE: Nuh-uh.

KIM BEEDE: That's what Laurie just said.

ERICA IPPOLITO: Great.