Officials conducting first statewide survey to measure costs of damage caused by invasive species

The Governor’s Invasive Species Council is conducting the first statewide survey to determine the damage costs caused by invasive species in Pennsylvania.

The survey reportedly takes about 15 to 20 minutes to complete and was given to the council’s 21 member organizations.

“Invasive plants, insects and animals eat into the bottom line for agriculture and other businesses, government agencies, and non-profits,” Pennsylvania Secretary of Agriculture Russell C. Redding said. “But measuring what Pennsylvanians spend collectively on preventing and controlling that damage is a huge challenge. We have heard from more than 800 organizations and individuals and hope to get a comprehensive view of how extensive the impact is on our economy and daily work lives.”

The council is also looking for the costs that are tied to preventing and controlling invasive species.

Data collected from the survey will help inform a strategic, regional partnership approach to managing invasive species, a press release said.

The Governor’s Invasive Species Council works to identify invasive plant, insect and animal species that threaten or may threaten Pennsylvania’s natural and agricultural resources and the industries they support. According to a press release, you can learn more about the council, about the management plans it implements and about strategic recommendations — along with other efforts to protect and grow Pennsylvania’s $132.5 billion agriculture and food industry — at agriculture.pa.gov.

The survey can be found here and will be open until Nov. 18.

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